Glynis

Glynis is a Welsh female name, either a variant of Glenys derived from the Welsh word glân meaning “clean, clear, holy” via Proto-Celtic *glanos (clean; clear), or it’s an elaborated form of Welsh glyn “valley”.

Origin: Proto-Celtic

Meaning: “clean, clear, holy” or “valley”

Usage: Welsh

Variants:

  • Glenys (Welsh)
  • Glennis (anglicized spelling of Glynis/Glenys)
  • Glenice (anglicized spelling of Glynis/Glenys)

Galla

Galla is an Ancient Roman cognomen, the feminine form of Gallus which has a few possible meanings depending on its etymology:

  • the most popular is that it comes from the Latin word gallus meaning “rooster, cock” which ultimately derives from a PIE root word;
  • Gallus was also used to refer to someone who came from Gaul (Gallia in Latin), a region which now comprises France, Belgium, and parts of Germany and Italy; the name derives from Proto-Germanic *walhaz (foreigner) which may have originated from Latin Volcae, the name of a Celtic tribe which may possibly be derived from Proto-Celtic *wolkos (hawk), a word of uncertain origin (the Welsh word gwalch “hawk” derives from this) though perhaps related to Latin falco (falcon). It’s also been linked to Proto-Celtic *ulkʷos (wolf), seemingly because the Volcae fought with huge dogs, but that doesn’t seem as likely;
  • Incidentally, a gallus is also a eunuch priest of the Phrygian goddess Cybele and may be derived from a Phrygian origin;
  • Galla was also the name given to the Oromo people, an ethnic group in Ethiopia and Kenya, a word that the Oromo people consider derogatory;
  • Galla is also a Latin word meaning “oak-apple” (also known as an oak gall), derived from an uncertain origin;
  • Galla is also a surname, originating from the given name Gallus or as a nickname; it’s also an Indian surname, a variant of Kalla which seems to derive from a Telugu source.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain

Meaning: “rooster, cock”; originally referred to an inhabitant of Gaul “Gaul” or “Gallic”; also a Latin word “oak-apple”. Also the name of a eunuch priest dedicated to the goddess Cybele, as well as a derogatory word used to refer to the Oromo, an ethnic group in Ethiopia and Kenya

Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish

Variants:

  • Gala (Spanish)
  • Gal·la (Catalan)

Male forms:

  • Gallus (Ancient Roman)
  • Galo (Spanish)
  • Gallo (Italian)
  • Havel (Czech, Slovak)
  • Gál (Hungarian)
  • Gal (Slovene)
  • Gaweł (Polish)

Ghazi

Ghazi غَازِي is an Arabic male name meaning “warrior, champion, hero” and derives from a word referring to a Muslim warrior who fights against non-Muslims; ghazi is the active particle of ḡazā غَزَا (to raid, to attack, to wage war against; to overwhelm, overcome) derived from a root word related to intending to taking over. This was later adopted by several Ottoman Sultans as a title.

Ghazi is also an Arabic surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Arabic

Meaning: “warrior, champion, hero”

Usage: Arabic

Variants:

  • Gazi (Arabic, Ottoman Turkish)
  • Ghazy (Egyptian Arabic)

Gad

In the Old Testament Gad is the name of the first son of Jacob and Zilpah (his wife Leah’s handmaid) and his seventh son overall, and is the founder of one of the Israelite tribes named after him. The name comes from Hebrew gad (גָּד) meaning “luck” which seems to derive from an unknown origin. Gad could also be used as a nickname for Gadiel meaning “luck of God” or God is my luck”. 

Gad is also the name of a pan-Semitic god of fortune and seems to be related to the given name; perhaps the Gad in the Bible was named after this deity. Gad is also the name of a prophet or seer of King David

Gad also seems to be another Hebrew word for coriander

Gad (جاد) is also an Arabic male name, the Egyptian form of Jad meaning “earnest, serious”.

Gad is also a Navajo word meaning “juniper (tree)”.

Origin: Hebrew via an uncertain etymology; Arabic; Navajo

Meaning: a Hebrew male name “luck”; an Arabic male name “serious, earnest”; also a Navajo word “juniper” 

Usage: Hebrew, Arabic (Egyptian)

Pronunciation: gad or jad

Variants:

  • Gadiel (Hebrew)
  • Jad (Arabic)

Links:

Gita

Gita is an Indian female name meaning “song” which derives from Sanskrit gīta गीता which ultimately derives from a PIE origin. The Bhagavad Gita (the divine song) is the name of a Hindu epic poem in which the god Krishna and the prince Arjuna have a philosophical debate about the righteousness of battle against friends and family.

Gita is also a Czech and Latvian female name, originating as a nickname for Brigita (a form of Irish Bridget meaning “exalted one”) or Margita (from Latin Margarita meaning “pearl”).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: means “song” as an Indian and Hindi female name; also a Czech and Latvian female name originating as a shortened form of Brigita “exalted one” or Margita “pearl”

Usage: Indian, Hindi, Latvian, Czech

Pronunciation: pronounced with a hard g, like Gilbert or glass; geeta

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Variants:

  • Geeta (Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali, Telugu)
  • Geetha (a Southern Indian transcription of Gita)

Gloria

Gloria is a female given name which comes from the Latin word glōria meaning “glory, renown, fame”, used in praise, exaltation, or great honor of someone or something by common consent. It’s background is of obscure/uncertain origin; it may be related to Old Latin *gnōria (knowledge, fame) via PIE root word *ǵneh₃- (to know).

Gloria is also used in a religious sense, the name of several Christian liturgical hymns in praise of God, so it also connotes a sense of “divine glory”.

Gloria is also a Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian surname which originated either a matronymic name or as an occupational name for a singer, in reference to the hymn Gloria in excelsis Deo (“Glory to God in the highest”).

Origin: uncertain, likely from a Proto-Indo-European source

Meaning: “glory, renown, praise, fame”

Usage: English, Latin, Italian, Spanish, German

Nicknames: Glory, Ria, Lori

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Variants:

  • Glória (Portuguese)
  • Glòria (Catalan)
  • Gloría (Icelandic)
  • Gloriana (an elaborated form of Gloria created by English poet Edmund Spenser in 1590 for his poem The Faerie Queen)
  • Gloriela (Spanish, Swedish)
  • Glorina (English)