Nita

Nita as an English name originated as a shortened form of names ending in nita such as Anita (a diminutive of Ana/Anna meaning “favor, grace” which ultimately derives from a Proto-Semitic root word), Juanita (diminutive of Juana, the Spanish equivalent of Joanna, the feminine form of John “Yahweh is gracious”); or Bonita, a Spanish/Portuguese word meaning “pretty, beautiful” which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Nita is also an Indian female name meaning “modest, correct, well-behaved” and “led, guided”.

Nita is also a Choctaw word meaning ‘bear”

Origin: Proto-Semitic; Hebrew; Proto-Indo-European; Choctaw

Meaning: a nickname for Anita “grace, favor”, Juanita “Yahweh is gracious”, or Bonita “pretty, beautiful”; an Indian female name “modest, correct, well-behaved” and “led, guided”; a Choctaw word “bear”

Usage: English, Indian, Marathi, Choctaw

Variants:

  • Neeta (Indian, Marathi)
  • Nitha (Indian, Marathi)
  • Neetha (Indian, Marathi)

Ertuğrul

Ertuğrul is a Turkish male name, the name of the father of Osman I, founder of the Ottoman Empire. The name is composed of Turkish er (man) and tuğrul (referring to a mythical bird of prey, perhaps based on a falcon).

Ertuğrul is also a Turkish surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Turkic

Meaning: “man + bird of prey”, possibly in reference to a falcon”

Usage: Turkish

Pronunciation: in Turkish the ğ is a silent letter so Ertuğrul in Turkish is pronounced as er-tu-rel (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Tuğrul (Turkish)

Ertuğrul ارطغرل‎ (Arabic)

Rukia

Rukia will be familiar for many fans of the Bleach manga as the name of one of its main characters, Rukia Kuchiki. Although it’s written with the katakana ルキア, according to its author Tite Kubo he seems to have based it on Latin Lucia meaning “light” (*interesting fact for those who don’t know but in the Japanese language there isn’t an L sound, often being transliterated as an R sound).

However, Rukia can also be written with various kanji with various meanings such as:

ru

  • “flow, current”
  • “precious stone; gem; lapis lazuli”
  • “detain; fasten, halt”

ki

  • “hollyhock”
  • “rare, unusual”
  • “rare, uncommon; hope; beg, request”

a

  • “Asia; second, ranking next”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s るきあ.

Rukia could also be used as a variant spelling of Ruqayya, an Arabic female name meaning “spell, enchantment, charm” or “rise, ascent”.

Rukia is also the name of a genus of birds in the white-eye family. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find the meaning nor origin behind the name.

Origin: Japanese, Arabic

Meaning: a variety of meanings depending in the kanji used; also a variant transcription of Ruqqaya “spell, enchantment, charm” or “rise, ascent”; also the name of a genus of birds

Usage: Japanese, Arabic

Variants:

  • Ruqqaya (Arabic
  • Ruqqayah (Arabic)
  • Ruqaya (Arabic)
  • Ruqaiya (Arabic)
  • Ruqaiyyah (Arabic)
  • Roghayeh (Persian)
  • Rukiye (Turkish)
  • Rukiya (Arabic)- Rukiya is also a Japanese male name

Kanna

Kanna is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

kan

  • “bookmark”
  • “ring, circle, wheel”
  • “tolerant, lenient, generous”
  • “god, deity”
  • “citrus fruit”
  • “joy, delight, pleasure”
  • “daring, brave, bold”

na

  • “greens, vegetables”
  • “what”
  • “Nara; what”
  • “calm, lull” (na(gi)
  • “south”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s かんな while it can also be written in katakana as カンナ.

Kanna (寛和) is also the name of a Japanese era that lasted for two years (985-987). The kanji that make up the name can also be read as Hirokazu meaning “gentleness, harmony”, as well as the name of a type of Japanese plane, a wood-working tool.

Kanna (also spelled channa and canna) is also the name of a succulent plant in South Africa (also known as Sceletium tortuosum) that has been used for centuries as a mood enhancer, able to relieve stress and anxiety as well as induce feelings of euphoria; and can be either smoked, chewed, or brewed as a tea. The kanna plant is also known as Kougoed in Afrikaans meaning “something to chew” or “a thing to chew on”.

Kanna is also another name for Platysace cirrosa (also known as karna), a perennial herb found in Western Australia. Kanna is the Noongar name for the plant, the Noongar being Aboriginal Australians.

Kanna (also known as ganna) is also another name for Caroxylon aphyllum, a species of shrub found in the Karoo region of South Africa.

Kanna is also the name of a town in ancient Lycaonia (what is now modern-day Turkey) as well as the name of a village in southern Poland.

Kanna is also the Haitian Creole word for “duck”.

Origin: Japanese

Meaning: a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used; also the name of a Japanese era and a Japanese plane (wood-working tool); the name of a succulent plant in S. Africa and a shrub, a perennial herb in W. Australia, as well as the name name of a town in Ancient Lycaonia and a village in Poland; also a Haitian Creole word “duck”

Usage: Japanese

Lyall

Lyall comes from a Scottish surname via an Old Norse name, Liulfr. The second element derives from Old Norse úlfr meaning “wolf” while the first element of the name remains uncertain.

It’s also possible that Lyall originated as a pet-form of Lionel or Lyon, both meaning “lion”; it derives from Latin leō < Ancient Greek léōn which derives from an uncertain origin; it’s possible it could have been adopted from a non Indo-European source, perhaps from Proto-Semitic *labiʾ-, *labuʾ.

Incidentally, Lyall is a homophone of Lyle (which has a totally different etymology and means “island”).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain, possibly from a Proto-Semitic origin

Meaning: a shortened form of an Old Norse name “wolf”; could also have originated as a pet-form of Lionel or Lyon “lion”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Lyell (English)

Galla

Galla is an Ancient Roman cognomen, the feminine form of Gallus which has a few possible meanings depending on its etymology:

  • the most popular is that it comes from the Latin word gallus meaning “rooster, cock” which ultimately derives from a PIE root word;
  • Gallus was also used to refer to someone who came from Gaul (Gallia in Latin), a region which now comprises France, Belgium, and parts of Germany and Italy; the name derives from Proto-Germanic *walhaz (foreigner) which may have originated from Latin Volcae, the name of a Celtic tribe which may possibly be derived from Proto-Celtic *wolkos (hawk), a word of uncertain origin (the Welsh word gwalch “hawk” derives from this) though perhaps related to Latin falco (falcon). It’s also been linked to Proto-Celtic *ulkʷos (wolf), seemingly because the Volcae fought with huge dogs, but that doesn’t seem as likely;
  • Incidentally, a gallus is also a eunuch priest of the Phrygian goddess Cybele and may be derived from a Phrygian origin;
  • Galla was also the name given to the Oromo people, an ethnic group in Ethiopia and Kenya, a word that the Oromo people consider derogatory;
  • Galla is also a Latin word meaning “oak-apple” (also known as an oak gall), derived from an uncertain origin;
  • Galla is also a surname, originating from the given name Gallus or as a nickname; it’s also an Indian surname, a variant of Kalla which seems to derive from a Telugu source.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain

Meaning: “rooster, cock”; originally referred to an inhabitant of Gaul “Gaul” or “Gallic”; also a Latin word “oak-apple”. Also the name of a eunuch priest dedicated to the goddess Cybele, as well as a derogatory word used to refer to the Oromo, an ethnic group in Ethiopia and Kenya

Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish

Variants:

  • Gala (Spanish)
  • Gal·la (Catalan)

Male forms:

  • Gallus (Ancient Roman)
  • Galo (Spanish)
  • Gallo (Italian)
  • Havel (Czech, Slovak)
  • Gál (Hungarian)
  • Gal (Slovene)
  • Gaweł (Polish)

Corby

Corby comes from an English surname with three possible meanings depending on its etymology:

  • the first is that it comes from a locational origin, any of several places called Corby. It’s made up from Old Norse personal name Kori (which seems to be the Old Norse form of Irish cuire “troop, band, company”) combined with býr (settlement, farm) although the one in Cumbria has its first element derived from Old Irish personal name Corc;
  • it’s also possible Corby originated as a diminutive of French corb meaning “raven”;
  • it may also have originated as variant of Irish surname Corboy, the anglicized spelling of Gaelic Mac Corrbuidhe meaning “son of Corrbuidhe”, the latter a byname made up of Irish corr (crane) and buidhe (yellow)

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Proto-Celtic

Meaning: “Kori’s farm” or “Kori’s settlement”, or “Corc’s farm/settlement”; a diminutive of French corb “raven”; a variant of Irish surname Corboy “crane+ yellow”

Usage: English

Variants:

Osman

Osman is the Turkish and Kurdish form of Uthman, an Arabic male name meaning “baby bustard” (bustards are large terrestrial birds that live in dry grasslands and steppes). Osman I was the founder of the Ottoman Empire.

Osman is also a surname- a Turkish surname originating from the given name, but it’s also an English surname, a variant of Anglo-Saxon Osmær meaning “god + fame”, made up of Old English os (god) and maer (fame), though it may also be a variant of Osmond “god + protection”.

Origin: Arabic; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “baby bustard”; also an English surname “god + fame” or “god + protection”

Usage: Turkish, Kurdish, English

Variants:

  • Uthman (Arabic)
  • Othman (Arabic, Malay)
  • Usman (Urdu)
  • Ousmane (Western African)
  • Cismaan (Eastern African, Somali)
  • Cusmaan (Eastern African, Somali)
  • Osmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Osmond (Anglo-Saxon, English)

Zimri

Zimri is the name of several figures in the Bible, including a king of Israel who only ruled for seven days before being succeeded by Omri. The names comes from Hebrew zamar זמר “to sing” or “song, music” which ultimately derives from Proto-Semitic *zamar– (to make music). I’ve also seen quite a few sources list it as meaning “praiseworthy” and I’m not sure which meaning is the right one, or if they both are.

Zimri is also the name of a Pashtun tribe in Afghanistan which may be derived from Pashto zmaráy زمری‎ meaning “lion”, which is also the name of the fifth month of the Afghan calendar.

Origin: Proto-Semitic; Pashto

Meaning: from Hebrew related to “music, song” though I’ve also seen it meaning “praiseworthy”; also the name of a Pashtun tribe likely meaning “lion”

Usage: Hebrew, Pashto

Variants:

  • Zmarai (Pashto)
  • Zmaray (Pashto)
  • Zmarak (Pashto)

Female forms:

  • Zemirah (Hebrew)
  • Zemira (Hebrew)

Björn

Björn is a Swedish and Icelandic male name meaning “bear” via Old Norse bjǫrn (bear) via Proto-Germanic *berô (bear) via a PIE root word.

Björn is also a Swedish surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “bear”

Usage: Swedish, Icelandic, German, Dutch)

Pronunciation: b-yorn; Forvo

Variants:

  • Bjoern (German)
  • Bjørn (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Bjǫrn (Old Norse, Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Bjarni (Icelandic, Faroese, Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Bjarne (Danish, Norwegian, Swedish)

Berengaria

Berengaria is the Latinized feminine form of Berengar, an Ancient Germanic name made up of Proto-Germanic berô (bear) and Proto-Germanic *gaizaz (spear), both of which derive from a PIE source.

Berengaria seems to have been a popular name among Spanish royalty, the name of several queen consorts and daughters of Castilian kings and queens.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “bear + spear”

Usage: Spanish, Italian

Variants:

  • Bérengère (French)

Male forms:

  • Bérenger (French)
  • Berengar (Ancient Germanic)
  • Berenguer (Catalan)
  • Berengario (Italian)
  • Berengier (Occitan)
  • Berenguier (Occitan)