Braulio

Braulio is a Spanish and Galician male name whose most significant namesake was Braulio of Zaragoza who was a Bishop of Zaragoza who lived in the Kingdom of the Visigoths. The origin of the name is uncertain- it could have derived from Proto-Germanic *brandaz (fire; firebrand; sword).

It’s also possible that Braulio may be related to Spanish brillar “to shine, glow, to sparkle” via Italian brillare (to shine, sparkle) < Latin beryllus, berillus (beryl) < Ancient Greek berullos which ultimately seems to be derived from a Dravidian origin.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: uncertain though it’s been linked to Proto-Germanic “fire; firebrand; sword” or “to shine”, “shining”

Usage: Spanish, Galician

Variants:

  • Bráulio (Portuguese)

Kendra

Kendra seems to be a feminine form of Kenneth, itself an anglicized form of two Scottish Gaelic names:

  • the first is Coinneach meaning “handsome, fair, beautiful” via Gaelic caoin (handsome);
  • the second is Cináed, a name of uncertain etymology though the second element seems to be derived from Old Irish áed “fire” < Proto-Celtic *aidus which ultimately derives from a PIE root word. The first element may be derived from Irish cion (love, affection; regard, esteem), so the name would essentially mean “beloved of Aodh”, Aodh being the god of the underworld;
  • Cináed may also possibly be related to Ciniod, a Pictish name with a very different origin. Though the first element is uncertain, the second element seems to be related to Proto-Brythonic *jʉð (lord, judge).

Kendra could also be a feminine form of Kendrick which in this case comes from an English, Welsh, and Scottish surname with a few possible meanings such as (respectively) “royal power”, “chief hero” or “great champion”, or “son of Henry“.

It’s also likely that Kendra could have been inspired as a smoosh of Ken/Kenneth and Sandra, a shortened form of Alexandra or Alessandra meaning “defending men” or “defender of men”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain

Meaning: “handsome, fair, beautiful”; possibly “beloved of Aodh”; may also be related to a Pictish name, the second element possibly meaning “lord”; “royal power”, “chief hero” or “great champion”, or “son of Henry”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Kenna (Scottish)
  • Kenina (Scottish)

Male forms:

  • Kenneth (Scottish, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)
  • Kennith (English)
  • Kennet (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)
  • Coinneach (Scottish)
  • Cináed (Scottish, Irish)

Arden

Arden comes from an English surname, a locational name for someone who came from Arden in Warwickshire or the one from North Yorkshire. The name seems to derive from a Celtic source, via Celtic *ardwo meaning “high”. Another possible meaning I’ve seen listed for Arden as a surname is “eagle valley”, made up of Old English elements earn (eagle) and dene (valley).

Arden is also a Spanish word, the third person plural or arder meaning “to burn”, derived from Latin ardere

Arden is the name of several places in England, including the Forest of Arden located in Warwickshire; the Forest of Arden is the main setting used in William Shakespeare’s play As You Like It (1599), which may have been based on the Ardennes, a heavily forested, hilly region spread out among France, Germany, Luxembourg, and Belgium, which may derive from the same Celtic root word as above. 

Origin: uncertain, either from a Celtic or a Proto-Indo-European source

Meaning: as an English surname it seems to derive from a Celtic source “high”, though it may also mean “eagle valley”; also a Spanish word “they burn”

Usage: English

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Brandon

Brandon comes from an English surname, a locational name for any of several places called Brandon. The name is composed of Old English elements brōm (broom) and dūn (hill), essentially meaning “hill covered with broom”, likely in reference to a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs. However, the town of Brandon in Lincolnshire seems to have gotten its name from Old English brant (tall, high, steep) which seems to be in reference to the steep banks of a river nearby.

However, Brandon is also a French surname which in this case comes from Old French brandon meaning “firebrand”, referring to a piece of burning wood or other burning material; it can also be used to refer to someone who causes trouble, a troublemaker or agitator. It derives from Frankish *brand (fire, flame) as well as also being a poetic word for “sword”; via Proto-Germanic *brandaz (fire; firebrand; torch; sword) ultimately derived from a PIE root word.

In some cases, Brandon could also be used as an anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Breandáin meaning “son of Breandán”, the latter a variant of Irish name Brendan meaning “prince, king” via Proto-Celtic *brigantīnos, a diminutive of *brigantī (high, exalted) which derives from a PIE root word.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: a surname with a few possible origins: “broom hill” or essentially “hill covered with broom”; “steep hill”; a French surname “firebrand”; also an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Breandáin “son of Breandán”, Breandán meaning “prince, king”

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Branden (English)
  • Brendan (Irish, English, Breton)

Aidan

Aidan is an Irish male name, the anglicized form of Aodhán meaning “little fire” or “little fiery one”, made up of Aodh via Old Irish Áed (fire) and the diminutive suffix -án.

In Irish mythology Aodh (pr. ae like hay) is one of the sons of King Lir and the brother of Fionnuala, Conn, and Fiachra; he and his siblings were turned into swans by their jealous stepmother Aoife for 900 years.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “little fire” or “little fiery one”

Usage: Irish, Scottish, English

Variants:

  • Aiden (English)
  • Aden (English)
  • Aydan (English)
  • Ayden (English)
  • Aedan (Irish, English)
  • Edan (Irish, Scottish)
  • Áed (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedán (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedh (Ancient Irish)
  • Aodh (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhagán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Iagan (Scottish)