Duvessa

Duvessa is the anglicized form of Dubh Essa meaning “black waterfall”, made up of Irish dubh (black; black-haired) and eas (waterfall, cascade, rapid). Dubh Essa (also spelled Dubhessa) was a fairy common given name in medieval Ireland, in the 13th/14th century.

Duvessa was used in Irish playwright M.J. Molloy’s play The Wooing of Duvessa (1964).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “black waterfall”

Usage: medieval Irish

Variants:

  • Dubh Essa (medieval Irish)
  • Dubhessa (medieval Irish(

Lulu

Lulu لؤلؤة comes from the Arabic word meaning “pearl” and is often used a female given name. I’ve also come across the name as being used as a pet-name often given to slaves (male and female) in the ancient Middle East.

Lulu also originated as a diminutive of names beginning with the Lu/Lou sounds such as Louise/Louisa (“famous battle” or “famous in battle”), Lucy, Lucia (“light”), Luanne (a combination of Louise + Anne “favor, grace”), etc.

Lulu is also a Chinese female name, often used as a double name such as lù lù 露露 meaning “dew” or lù lù 璐璐 “beautiful jade”. There are likely other meanings depending on the characters used.

Origin: Arabic; Chinese

Meaning: “pearl” in Arabic; often used as a short form of names such as Louise “famous battle” or “famous in battle”, Lucy “light”, Luanne; a Chinese female name with varying meanings depending on the characters used “dew” or “beautiful jade”

Usage: Arabic, English, Chinese

Rukia

Rukia will be familiar for many fans of the Bleach manga as the name of one of its main characters, Rukia Kuchiki. Although it’s written with the katakana ルキア, according to its author Tite Kubo he seems to have based it on Latin Lucia meaning “light” (*interesting fact for those who don’t know but in the Japanese language there isn’t an L sound, often being transliterated as an R sound).

However, Rukia can also be written with various kanji with various meanings such as:

ru

  • “flow, current”
  • “precious stone; gem; lapis lazuli”
  • “detain; fasten, halt”

ki

  • “hollyhock”
  • “rare, unusual”
  • “rare, uncommon; hope; beg, request”

a

  • “Asia; second, ranking next”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s るきあ.

Rukia could also be used as a variant spelling of Ruqayya, an Arabic female name meaning “spell, enchantment, charm” or “rise, ascent”.

Rukia is also the name of a genus of birds in the white-eye family. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find the meaning nor origin behind the name.

Origin: Japanese, Arabic

Meaning: a variety of meanings depending in the kanji used; also a variant transcription of Ruqqaya “spell, enchantment, charm” or “rise, ascent”; also the name of a genus of birds

Usage: Japanese, Arabic

Variants:

  • Ruqqaya (Arabic
  • Ruqqayah (Arabic)
  • Ruqaya (Arabic)
  • Ruqaiya (Arabic)
  • Ruqaiyyah (Arabic)
  • Roghayeh (Persian)
  • Rukiye (Turkish)
  • Rukiya (Arabic)- Rukiya is also a Japanese male name

Marian

Marian is probably a name many will associate with Maid Marian, a heroine in English folklore and the love interest of Robin Hood. Marian is an English female name, a variant of Marion, itself a medieval French diminutive of Marie, which ultimately derives from Hebrew Miriam,  a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

It’s also possible that Marian could be considered as a combination of the names Mary and Ann (“favor, grace”)

Marian is also a Polish, Czech, and Romanian male given name, in this case derived from Marianus, a derivative of Marius, a Roman family name on uncertain etymology and meaning. It’s been linked to Mars, the Roman god of war, but also as a masculine form of Maria (the Latinate form of Miriam) or from Latin mare “sea”, maria being its plural form. It’s also been linked to Latin mas “man, male”, but ultimately Marius may have originated from a Sabine origin.

Marian is also a Romanian, English, and French surname originating from the given name.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: a diminutive of Mary, meaning uncertain though various meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, “wished for child”, “beloved” or “love”; a combination of Mary + Ann “favor, grace”; possibly from Latin “sea” or “man, manly”; may also be related to the Roman god of war, Mars

Usage: English (female only), Polish, Czech, Romanian, German (male)

Variants:

  • Marion (French, English)
  • Marianne (French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Marielle (French)
  • Mariette (French)
  • Marise (French)
  • Maryse (French)
  • Manon (French, Dutch)
  • Mariana (Ancient Roman, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Bulgarian)

Male forms:

  • Marián (Czech, Slovak, Hungarian)
  • Marion (English)
  • Marianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Marius (Ancient Roman, German, Romanian, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French, Lithuanian, English)
  • Mariano (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Mario (Italian, Spanish, German, Croatian)

Rafer

Rafer is a male given name originating as a pet-form of either Rafferty, an Irish surname meaning “flood tide” or “abundance, prosperity”; or Raphael/Rafael meaning “God has healed” or “God heals”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Hebrew

Meaning: originally a pet-form of either Rafferty “flood tide” or “abundance, prosperity” or Raphael/Rafael “God has healed”, “God heals”

Usage: English

Pronunciation: not sure. It could be either ray-fer or raffer

Meta

Meta is a Scandinavian, German, and Slovene short form of Margareta from English Margaret meaning “pearl” which comes from Ancient Greek margarítēs μαργᾰρῑ́της (pearl) which derives from an unknown origin, though it could be derived from an Indo-Iranian origin.

Meta (μετά) is also the name of a minor figure in Greek mythology, the first wife of Aegeus (the king of Athens and father of Theseus with a different woman). The name means “beyond” and derives from the same Greek prefix meaning “after” or “beyond” which derives from a PIE root word.

Meta is also a surname- first an Albanian surname whose meaning I couldn’t find, and it’s also a Japanese surname written with the kanji 米 (rice) + 田 “rice paddy, rice field” and written in hiragana as めた.

Origin: uncertain though possibly from an Indo-Iranian source; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: a shorted form of Margareta “pearl”; also a Greek prefix “after” or “beyond”

Usage: German, Danish, Swedish, Slovene, Ancient Greek

Homa

Homa هما is a Persian female name which comes from the name of a mythical bird in Persian mythology. The Homa (also spelled Huma) is said to fly eternally, never landing on earth. It’s said that if its shadow fell upon a person it was considered good luck, signaling a blessed and happy fortune for that person. It has some similarities to the phoenix, thought to live a long life before dying in flames and rising anew from the ashes.

Although the exact meaning behind the name is uncertain, it has popularly been given that the first part of the name, hu, represents “spirit” while the second part comes from Arabic ma مَاء “water”.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: the name of a mythical bird in Persian mythology, the meaning behind the name is unknown though it’s been linked to hu “spirit” + ma “water”

Usage: Persian

Variants:

  • Huma (Persian)

Rocío

Rocío is a Spanish female name (and word) meaning “dew”, which comes from the Marian title Marîa del Rocío (Mary of the dew) which ultimately derives from Latin rōs (dew) via a PIE root word.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “dew”

Usage: Spanish

Pronunciation: ro-thee-o (European Spanish); ro-see-o (Latin American Spanish

Variants:

  • Rocio (anglicized spelling of Rocío)

Kinvara

Kinvara is the name of a village located in the southwest County Galway, Ireland as well as the name of a town in west County Galway. The name comes from Irish Cinn Mhara meaning “head of the sea”, composed of Irish ceann (head) and mara, an inflection of muir (sea), both of which ultimately derive from a PIE origin.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “head of the sea”

Usage: English (British)

Mariel

Mariel is a diminutive of Mary, (seemingly influenced by Muriel) the English form of Hebrew Miriam, a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: uncertain though various meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, “wished for child”, “beloved” or “love”

Usage: English, Filipino

Variants:

  • Marielle (French diminutive of Marie)

Myra

Myra was first coined as a given name by English poet Fulke Greville (1554-1628) for his verse poem Caelica sonnet XXV (25). He may have based it from Latin myrrh, the the name of a natural gum or resin extracted from certain plants that was extremely valuable in the ancient world, used for perfume, incense, and medicine. The origin of the word derives from a Semitic root word meaning “bitter”.

Another possible source for the name is possibly an anagram of Mary, a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

Incidentally, Myra was also the name of an Ancient Greek town located in what is now a part of Turkey.

Origin: Semitic; uncertain/unknown etymology

Meaning: uncertain though it could possibly be based from Latin “myrrh”; also possibly an anagram of Mary, of uncertain etymology and meaning though possible meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, or “wished for child”, or “beloved”, “love”

Usage: English

Pronunciation: mie-ra (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Mayra (Spanish, Hispanic)

Gita

Gita is an Indian female name meaning “song” which derives from Sanskrit gīta गीता which ultimately derives from a PIE origin. The Bhagavad Gita (the divine song) is the name of a Hindu epic poem in which the god Krishna and the prince Arjuna have a philosophical debate about the righteousness of battle against friends and family.

Gita is also a Czech and Latvian female name, originating as a nickname for Brigita (a form of Irish Bridget meaning “exalted one”) or Margita (from Latin Margarita meaning “pearl”).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: means “song” as an Indian and Hindi female name; also a Czech and Latvian female name originating as a shortened form of Brigita “exalted one” or Margita “pearl”

Usage: Indian, Hindi, Latvian, Czech

Pronunciation: pronounced with a hard g, like Gilbert or glass; geeta

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Variants:

  • Geeta (Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali, Telugu)
  • Geetha (a Southern Indian transcription of Gita)