Asiya

Asiya آسية is the name of the wife of the pharaoh during the time of Moses, his adoptive mother according to Islamic tradition. The name seems to be derived from Arabic root word a-s-y أسي “to be distressed, to be gloomy”.

Origin: Arabic

Meaning: “to be distressed, to be gloomy, grieved”

Usage: Arabic

Variants:

  • Assia (Maghrebi Arabic)
  • Asja (Bosnian)

Kanna

Kanna is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

kan

  • “bookmark”
  • “ring, circle, wheel”
  • “tolerant, lenient, generous”
  • “god, deity”
  • “citrus fruit”
  • “joy, delight, pleasure”
  • “daring, brave, bold”

na

  • “greens, vegetables”
  • “what”
  • “Nara; what”
  • “calm, lull” (na(gi)
  • “south”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s かんな while it can also be written in katakana as カンナ.

Kanna (寛和) is also the name of a Japanese era that lasted for two years (985-987). The kanji that make up the name can also be read as Hirokazu meaning “gentleness, harmony”, as well as the name of a type of Japanese plane, a wood-working tool.

Kanna (also spelled channa and canna) is also the name of a succulent plant in South Africa (also known as Sceletium tortuosum) that has been used for centuries as a mood enhancer, able to relieve stress and anxiety as well as induce feelings of euphoria; and can be either smoked, chewed, or brewed as a tea. The kanna plant is also known as Kougoed in Afrikaans meaning “something to chew” or “a thing to chew on”.

Kanna is also another name for Platysace cirrosa (also known as karna), a perennial herb found in Western Australia. Kanna is the Noongar name for the plant, the Noongar being Aboriginal Australians.

Kanna (also known as ganna) is also another name for Caroxylon aphyllum, a species of shrub found in the Karoo region of South Africa.

Kanna is also the name of a town in ancient Lycaonia (what is now modern-day Turkey) as well as the name of a village in southern Poland.

Kanna is also the Haitian Creole word for “duck”.

Origin: Japanese

Meaning: a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used; also the name of a Japanese era and a Japanese plane (wood-working tool); the name of a succulent plant in S. Africa and a shrub, a perennial herb in W. Australia, as well as the name name of a town in Ancient Lycaonia and a village in Poland; also a Haitian Creole word “duck”

Usage: Japanese

Alaia

Alaia is a Basque female name meaning “joyful, happy” from Basque alai (joyous, happy) which either derives from Latin alacer (lively, brisk; glad, happy, cheerful) via an uncertain origin; or it cold have been borrowed from Spanish alhaja “jewel; gem” which ultimately derives from an Arabic origin.

Spelled Alaïa it’s a French surname, the French form of Alia (an Arabic female name “exalted, loft, high, sublime”), and Alaia is also an Italian surname though I’m not sure if it also derives from Arabic or a different source entirely.

Alaia is also a variant spelling of Alia/Aliyah, an Arabic female name, the feminine form of Ali meaning “high, exalted, lofty, sublime”. 

Origin: uncertain; Arabic

Meaning: from Basque “joyful, happy”; “high, exalted, lofty, sublime”

Usage: Basque, English (as a variant spelling of Alia)

Variants:

  • Alia (Arabic)
  • Alaya (English)
  • Aaliyah (English)

Marian

Marian is probably a name many will associate with Maid Marian, a heroine in English folklore and the love interest of Robin Hood. Marian is an English female name, a variant of Marion, itself a medieval French diminutive of Marie, which ultimately derives from Hebrew Miriam,  a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

It’s also possible that Marian could be considered as a combination of the names Mary and Ann (“favor, grace”)

Marian is also a Polish, Czech, and Romanian male given name, in this case derived from Marianus, a derivative of Marius, a Roman family name on uncertain etymology and meaning. It’s been linked to Mars, the Roman god of war, but also as a masculine form of Maria (the Latinate form of Miriam) or from Latin mare “sea”, maria being its plural form. It’s also been linked to Latin mas “man, male”, but ultimately Marius may have originated from a Sabine origin.

Marian is also a Romanian, English, and French surname originating from the given name.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: a diminutive of Mary, meaning uncertain though various meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, “wished for child”, “beloved” or “love”; a combination of Mary + Ann “favor, grace”; possibly from Latin “sea” or “man, manly”; may also be related to the Roman god of war, Mars

Usage: English (female only), Polish, Czech, Romanian, German (male)

Variants:

  • Marion (French, English)
  • Marianne (French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Marielle (French)
  • Mariette (French)
  • Marise (French)
  • Maryse (French)
  • Manon (French, Dutch)
  • Mariana (Ancient Roman, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Bulgarian)

Male forms:

  • Marián (Czech, Slovak, Hungarian)
  • Marion (English)
  • Marianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Marius (Ancient Roman, German, Romanian, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French, Lithuanian, English)
  • Mariano (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Mario (Italian, Spanish, German, Croatian)

Kendra

Kendra seems to be a feminine form of Kenneth, itself an anglicized form of two Scottish Gaelic names:

  • the first is Coinneach meaning “handsome, fair, beautiful” via Gaelic caoin (handsome);
  • the second is Cináed, a name of uncertain etymology though the second element seems to be derived from Old Irish áed “fire” < Proto-Celtic *aidus which ultimately derives from a PIE root word. The first element may be derived from Irish cion (love, affection; regard, esteem), so the name would essentially mean “beloved of Aodh”, Aodh being the god of the underworld;
  • Cináed may also possibly be related to Ciniod, a Pictish name with a very different origin. Though the first element is uncertain, the second element seems to be related to Proto-Brythonic *jʉð (lord, judge).

Kendra could also be a feminine form of Kendrick which in this case comes from an English, Welsh, and Scottish surname with a few possible meanings such as (respectively) “royal power”, “chief hero” or “great champion”, or “son of Henry“.

It’s also likely that Kendra could have been inspired as a smoosh of Ken/Kenneth and Sandra, a shortened form of Alexandra or Alessandra meaning “defending men” or “defender of men”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain

Meaning: “handsome, fair, beautiful”; possibly “beloved of Aodh”; may also be related to a Pictish name, the second element possibly meaning “lord”; “royal power”, “chief hero” or “great champion”, or “son of Henry”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Kenna (Scottish)
  • Kenina (Scottish)

Male forms:

  • Kenneth (Scottish, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)
  • Kennith (English)
  • Kennet (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)
  • Coinneach (Scottish)
  • Cináed (Scottish, Irish)

Amias

Amias is a variant spelling of Amyas which derives from Latin amicus meaning “friend, friendly; amicable” via root word amō (to love) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word, and from which the word amicable comes from.

Amias is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “friend, friendly; amicable”

Usage: English

Pronunciation: a-mye-es (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Amyas (English)
  • Amis (Medieval English, Medieval French)
  • Ames (English)
  • Amys (Old English)
  • Amicus (Ancient Roman

Female forms:

  • Amice (Medieval English)
  • Amica (Ancient Roman)
  • Amity (English)

Illarion

Illarion is a Russian male name, the Russian form of Ancient Roman Hilarius meaning “cheerful happy” via Ancient Greek hilaros ἱλᾰρός (cheerful, merry, glad)< hilaos (gracious; kind) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “cheerful, glad”

Usage: Russian

Nicknames: Larya (Russian)

Variants:

  • Ilariy (Russian)
  • Ilarion (Macedonian, Bulgarian)
  • Hilarius (Ancient Roman)
  • Hilarion (Ancient Greek)
  • Ilari (Finnish)
  • Hillar (Estonian)
  • Hilaire (French)
  • Ilario (Italian)
  • Ealair (Scottish Gaelic)
  • Ellar (Scottish, anglicized form of Ealair)
  • Hilario (Spanish)
  • Ilar (Welsh)
  • Hilary (English)
  • Ellery (English)

Female forms:

  • Hilaria (Ancient Roman, Spanish)
  • Ilaria (Italian)
  • Ilary (Italian)
  • Hilary (English)
  • Hillary (English)
  • Ellery (English)

Furio

Furio is the Italian form of Furius, an Ancient Roman nomen derived from Latin furia meaning “fury, rage, madness” (and from which the words furious and fury derive from) which derives from an uncertain origin though it’s possible it may have originated from an Etruscan origin.

Furio is also an Italian surname originating from the given name.

Origin: unknown

Meaning: “fury, rage, madness”

Usage: Italian

Variants:

  • Furius (Ancient Roman)

Female forms:

  • Furia (Ancient Roman)

Mariel

Mariel is a diminutive of Mary, (seemingly influenced by Muriel) the English form of Hebrew Miriam, a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: uncertain though various meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, “wished for child”, “beloved” or “love”

Usage: English, Filipino

Variants:

  • Marielle (French diminutive of Marie)

Myra

Myra was first coined as a given name by English poet Fulke Greville (1554-1628) for his verse poem Caelica sonnet XXV (25). He may have based it from Latin myrrh, the the name of a natural gum or resin extracted from certain plants that was extremely valuable in the ancient world, used for perfume, incense, and medicine. The origin of the word derives from a Semitic root word meaning “bitter”.

Another possible source for the name is possibly an anagram of Mary, a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

Incidentally, Myra was also the name of an Ancient Greek town located in what is now a part of Turkey.

Origin: Semitic; uncertain/unknown etymology

Meaning: uncertain though it could possibly be based from Latin “myrrh”; also possibly an anagram of Mary, of uncertain etymology and meaning though possible meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, or “wished for child”, or “beloved”, “love”

Usage: English

Pronunciation: mie-ra (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Mayra (Spanish, Hispanic)

Jabez

Jabez is the name of a character in the Old Testament who is blessed by God. The name comes from Hebrew meaning “sorrow” or “pain”, so named because his birth caused his mother great pain.

Jabez is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Hebrew

Meaning: “sorrow” or “pain”

Usage: Hebrew, English

Pronunciation: jay-bez (Forvo)

Rona

Rona is the name of two islands in Scotland- North Rona, a small, uninhabited island in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, and South Rona, a small, inhabited island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland.  The name seems to derive from Old Norse meaning “rough island”.

Rona is also the name of a figure in Maori mythology. She had gone to the river one night when the moon was hidden behind some clouds. When she was returning home, Rona stepped on a root or rock and was so upset, began to curse at the moon. The moon god heard her and, angered, grabbed her. The woman was so frightened she grabbed onto a ngaio tree but was still pulled up into the sky. I couldn’t find a specific meaning behind the name in Maori.

Rona is also the feminine form of Ron, a Hebrew male name meaning “song, joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Maori; Hebrew

Meaning: the name of two islands in around Scotland “rough island”; the name of a figure in Maori mythology, meaning unknown; feminine form of Hebrew Ron “song, joy”

Usage: Scottish, English, Hebrew

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Variants:

  • Rhona (Scottish)
  • Ronna (English)

Male forms:

  • Ron (Hebrew)

Pippa

Pippa originated as a diminutive of Philippa, the feminine form of Philip meaning “lover of horses”, composed of Ancient Greek elements philos φῐ́λος (love, like) and hippos ῐ̔́ππος (horse), both derived from a PIE origin.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “lover of horses”

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Philippa (English)
  • Phillippa (English)
  • Philippina (German)

Male forms:

  • Philip (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Phillip (English)
  • Philippos (Ancient Greek)
  • Philippus (Latinized Ancient Greek)

Philip

Philip comes from Ancient Greek Philippos, the name of several kings of Macedonia which may have popularized the name, and was popular among European royalty. Philip is also found in the New Testament, the name of one of the 12 Apostles as well as the name of one of the Seven deacons. The name comes from Ancient Greek Philippos meaning “lover of horses”, composed of Ancient Greek elements philos φῐ́λος (love, like) and hippos ῐ̔́ππος (horse), both derived from a PIE origin.

Philip is also an English surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “lover of horses”

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Nicknames: Phil, Pip, Flip (Dutch diminutive of Filip)

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Variants:

  • Philippos (Ancient Greek)
  • Philippus (Latinized Ancient Greek)
  • Filippos (Modern Greek)
  • Phillip (English)
  • Filip (Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Polish, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Romanian, Finnish)
  • Filippus (Dutch)
  • Vilppu (Finnish)
  • Felip (Catalan)
  • Felipe (Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese)
  • Filipe (Portuguese)
  • Filippu (Corsican)
  • Philippe (French)
  • Philipp (German)
  • Fülöp (Hungarian)
  • Pilib (Irish)
  • Filib (Scottish)
  • Filippo (Italian)
  • Filips (Latvian)
  • Pilypas (Lithuanian)
  • Piripi (Maori)
  • Filipp (Russian)
  • Pylyp (Ukrainian)

Female forms:

  • Philippa (English)
  • Philipa (English)
  • Pippa (English diminutive of Philippa)
  • Phillippa (English, German)
  • Philippina (German)
  • Philippine (French)
  • Filippa (Modern Greek, Swedish, Italian)
  • Filipa (Portuguese)
  • Filipina (Polish)
  • Felipa (Spanish)