Kanna

Kanna is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

kan

  • “bookmark”
  • “ring, circle, wheel”
  • “tolerant, lenient, generous”
  • “god, deity”
  • “citrus fruit”
  • “joy, delight, pleasure”
  • “daring, brave, bold”

na

  • “greens, vegetables”
  • “what”
  • “Nara; what”
  • “calm, lull” (na(gi)
  • “south”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s かんな while it can also be written in katakana as カンナ.

Kanna (寛和) is also the name of a Japanese era that lasted for two years (985-987). The kanji that make up the name can also be read as Hirokazu meaning “gentleness, harmony”, as well as the name of a type of Japanese plane, a wood-working tool.

Kanna (also spelled channa and canna) is also the name of a succulent plant in South Africa (also known as Sceletium tortuosum) that has been used for centuries as a mood enhancer, able to relieve stress and anxiety as well as induce feelings of euphoria; and can be either smoked, chewed, or brewed as a tea. The kanna plant is also known as Kougoed in Afrikaans meaning “something to chew” or “a thing to chew on”.

Kanna is also another name for Platysace cirrosa (also known as karna), a perennial herb found in Western Australia. Kanna is the Noongar name for the plant, the Noongar being Aboriginal Australians.

Kanna (also known as ganna) is also another name for Caroxylon aphyllum, a species of shrub found in the Karoo region of South Africa.

Kanna is also the name of a town in ancient Lycaonia (what is now modern-day Turkey) as well as the name of a village in southern Poland.

Kanna is also the Haitian Creole word for “duck”.

Origin: Japanese

Meaning: a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used; also the name of a Japanese era and a Japanese plane (wood-working tool); the name of a succulent plant in S. Africa and a shrub, a perennial herb in W. Australia, as well as the name name of a town in Ancient Lycaonia and a village in Poland; also a Haitian Creole word “duck”

Usage: Japanese

Bleuette

Bleuette is a French female name, a combination of the French word bleu “blue” combined with the diminutive suffix -ette, so the name would essentially mean “little blue”. Bleuette was the name of a doll produced in France from 1905 to 1960.

Spelled Bleuet, it’s the French word for “cornflower” and is also the Canadian French word for “blueberry”. In France, the bleuet de France is the national symbol of remembrance for veterans, victims of war, widows, and orphans.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “little blue (one)”; spelled Bleuet it means “cornflower” in French and is the Canadian French word for “blueberry”

Usage: French

Variants:

  • Bleuet (French)

Hazel

Hazel is the name of a tree in the genus Corylus which bears the hazelnut tree. Hazel is also the name of a light-brown greenish color, often used to refer to eye color.

Hazel is also an English surname, a topographical name for someone who lived near a hazelnut tree; it could also have originated as a locational name for someone who came from Amy of several places called Heazile.

The origin of the name comes from Old English hæsl (hazel) < Proto-Germanic *haslaz which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “hazel” referring to both the tree and the color

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Hazelle (English)
  • Hayzel (English)

Melissa

Melissa is the name of a nymph in Greek mythology who helped nurse the infant Zeus along with Amalthea, when he was hidden from his father Cronus. She fed him honey and was also credited with the art of bee-keeping.

Melissa is also the name of a 3rd century BC Pythagorean philosopher and mathematician although very little is known of her life- actually, nothing at all.

Melissa is also the name of a good sorceress in the Italian epic poem Orlando Furioso and features in the Matter of France (a body of medieval literature and legendary material associated with France, especially involving Charlemagne). 

Melissa is the name of a genus of plants which also includes the lemon balm.

The name means “bee” or “honeybee” via Ancient Greek mélissa μέλισσᾰ (bee; honey) which derives from PIE *mélit (honey) and *leyǵʰ- (to lick).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “bee, honeybee”

Usage: Ancient Greek, English, French

Nicknames:Mel, Lissa, Lissy, Melly/Melli, Missy

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Variants:

  • Melyssa (English)
  • Melisa (English, Spanish, Bosnian, Turkish)
  • Melitta (Ancient Attic Greek)
  • Melita (Latinized Ancient Greek)
  • Melite (Ancient Greek)
  • Melisa (Turkish)
  • Melis (Turkish)
  • Melika (Hawaiian)
  • Mélissa (French)
  • Melissza (Hungarian)

Male forms:

  • Melissos (Ancient Greek)
  • Melissus (Ancient Greek)
  • Melisseus (Ancient Greek)

Serena

Serena is a Late Roman given name, the feminine form of Serenus which derives from Latin serenus meaning “clear, tranquil, serene”, originally used  to refer to clear, calm weather, and, figuratively, “cheerful, glad, joyous”. Though the origin of the word is uncertain it has been linked to PIE root word *ksero- (dry).

Serena is also an Italian and Catalan surname originating from the given name.

Serena could also be used as a Japanese female name (also spelled Serina) with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

  • seri  “parsley” + rei  “wise” + na  “greens; vegetables” (芹怜菜);
  • sei  “eventide; tide; salt water” + rei  “wise” + na  “greens; vegetables” (汐玲菜);
  • se  “world, society; generation” + rei  “manners, etiquette; bow, salute” + na  “Nara, what?” (世礼奈);
  • se  “rapids, current” + rei  “order, command, decree” + na  “Nara, what?” (瀬令奈);
  • se  “rapids, current” + ren  “attach; love; romance” + na  “Nara, what?” (瀬恋奈)

Written in hiragana it’s せれな. Serena is also written as セレナ in katakana.

Origin: uncertain, possibly Proto-Indo-European; Japanese

Meaning: from a Late Roman name “clear, tranquil, calm”; as a Japanese name, it has a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used in Japanese

Usage: English, Late Roman, French, Spanish, Italian, Catalan

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Variants:

  • Serina (English, Japanese)
  • Sarina (English, Dutch)
  • Serrena (English)
  • Serene (English)
  • Séréna (French)

Male forms:

  • Serenus (Late Roman)
  • Sereno (Italian)
  • Serene (English)