Asiya

Asiya آسية is the name of the wife of the pharaoh during the time of Moses, his adoptive mother according to Islamic tradition. The name seems to be derived from Arabic root word a-s-y أسي “to be distressed, to be gloomy”.

Origin: Arabic

Meaning: “to be distressed, to be gloomy, grieved”

Usage: Arabic

Variants:

  • Assia (Maghrebi Arabic)
  • Asja (Bosnian)

Ridwan

Ridwan رضوان is an Arabic male name meaning “satisfaction” and “being pleased with; consent, approval”. It’s the name of an angel in Islam who guards the gates of heaven.

Origin: Arabic

Meaning: “satisfaction, contentment, approval”

Usage: Arabic, Indonesian

Variants:

  • Rizwan (Urdu, Arabic)
  • Rizvan (Azerbaijani)
  • Rıdvan (Turkish)
  • Rızvan (Turkish)

Female forms:

  • Ridwana (Arabic)
  • Rizwana (Urdu, Arabic)

Sahar

Sahar سحر is an Arabic female name meaning “dawn” and is also a word in Arabic, Persian, and Urdu meaning “magic, charm, enchantment”, both of which derive from Arabic root word s-ḥ-r (س ح ر), related to catching. Spelled Shahar שחר, it’s a Hebrew unisex name also meaning “dawn”, and both names seem to be a cognate of Shahar, the god of dawn in Ugarit mythology, so it’s likely the name originates from a Proto-Semitic origin.

Sáhar סהר is also a Hebrew word meaning “crescent” in reference to the moon.

Origin: Proto-Semitic; Arabic, Hebrew

Meaning: “dawn” in both Arabic and Hebrew; in Arabic it also refers to “magic, charm, enchantment”; also a Hebrew word “crescent (moon)”

Usage: Arabic, Persian, Urdu

Variants:

  • Seher (Turkish)

Lulu

Lulu لؤلؤة comes from the Arabic word meaning “pearl” and is often used a female given name. I’ve also come across the name as being used as a pet-name often given to slaves (male and female) in the ancient Middle East.

Lulu also originated as a diminutive of names beginning with the Lu/Lou sounds such as Louise/Louisa (“famous battle” or “famous in battle”), Lucy, Lucia (“light”), Luanne (a combination of Louise + Anne “favor, grace”), etc.

Lulu is also a Chinese female name, often used as a double name such as lù lù 露露 meaning “dew” or lù lù 璐璐 “beautiful jade”. There are likely other meanings depending on the characters used.

Origin: Arabic; Chinese

Meaning: “pearl” in Arabic; often used as a short form of names such as Louise “famous battle” or “famous in battle”, Lucy “light”, Luanne; a Chinese female name with varying meanings depending on the characters used “dew” or “beautiful jade”

Usage: Arabic, English, Chinese

Rukia

Rukia will be familiar for many fans of the Bleach manga as the name of one of its main characters, Rukia Kuchiki. Although it’s written with the katakana ルキア, according to its author Tite Kubo he seems to have based it on Latin Lucia meaning “light” (*interesting fact for those who don’t know but in the Japanese language there isn’t an L sound, often being transliterated as an R sound).

However, Rukia can also be written with various kanji with various meanings such as:

ru

  • “flow, current”
  • “precious stone; gem; lapis lazuli”
  • “detain; fasten, halt”

ki

  • “hollyhock”
  • “rare, unusual”
  • “rare, uncommon; hope; beg, request”

a

  • “Asia; second, ranking next”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s るきあ.

Rukia could also be used as a variant spelling of Ruqayya, an Arabic female name meaning “spell, enchantment, charm” or “rise, ascent”.

Rukia is also the name of a genus of birds in the white-eye family. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find the meaning nor origin behind the name.

Origin: Japanese, Arabic

Meaning: a variety of meanings depending in the kanji used; also a variant transcription of Ruqqaya “spell, enchantment, charm” or “rise, ascent”; also the name of a genus of birds

Usage: Japanese, Arabic

Variants:

  • Ruqqaya (Arabic
  • Ruqqayah (Arabic)
  • Ruqaya (Arabic)
  • Ruqaiya (Arabic)
  • Ruqaiyyah (Arabic)
  • Roghayeh (Persian)
  • Rukiye (Turkish)
  • Rukiya (Arabic)- Rukiya is also a Japanese male name

Alaia

Alaia is a Basque female name meaning “joyful, happy” from Basque alai (joyous, happy) which either derives from Latin alacer (lively, brisk; glad, happy, cheerful) via an uncertain origin; or it cold have been borrowed from Spanish alhaja “jewel; gem” which ultimately derives from an Arabic origin.

Spelled Alaïa it’s a French surname, the French form of Alia (an Arabic female name “exalted, loft, high, sublime”), and Alaia is also an Italian surname though I’m not sure if it also derives from Arabic or a different source entirely.

Alaia is also a variant spelling of Alia/Aliyah, an Arabic female name, the feminine form of Ali meaning “high, exalted, lofty, sublime”. 

Origin: uncertain; Arabic

Meaning: from Basque “joyful, happy”; “high, exalted, lofty, sublime”

Usage: Basque, English (as a variant spelling of Alia)

Variants:

  • Alia (Arabic)
  • Alaya (English)
  • Aaliyah (English)

Osman

Osman is the Turkish and Kurdish form of Uthman, an Arabic male name meaning “baby bustard” (bustards are large terrestrial birds that live in dry grasslands and steppes). Osman I was the founder of the Ottoman Empire.

Osman is also a surname- a Turkish surname originating from the given name, but it’s also an English surname, a variant of Anglo-Saxon Osmær meaning “god + fame”, made up of Old English os (god) and maer (fame), though it may also be a variant of Osmond “god + protection”.

Origin: Arabic; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “baby bustard”; also an English surname “god + fame” or “god + protection”

Usage: Turkish, Kurdish, English

Variants:

  • Uthman (Arabic)
  • Othman (Arabic, Malay)
  • Usman (Urdu)
  • Ousmane (Western African)
  • Cismaan (Eastern African, Somali)
  • Cusmaan (Eastern African, Somali)
  • Osmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Osmond (Anglo-Saxon, English)

Mohammed

Mohammed محمّد is an Arabic male name, a variant transcription of Muhammed meaning “praised, commendable” via hammada حَمَّدَ (to praise, commend, laud) derived from a root word related to praising. It was the name of prophet Muhammad who introduced Islam to the Arabian peninsula which is likely why it’s such a popular boy’s name among Muslims.

Mohammed is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Arabic

Meaning: “praised, commendable”

Usage: Arabic, Bengali

Variants:

  • Muhammad (Arabic, Urdu, Punjabi, Pashto, Bengali, Tajik, Uzbek, Indonesian, Malay, Avar)
  • Mohammad (Arabic, Urdu, Punjabi, Pashto, Bengali, Tatar, Persian)
  • Muhammed (Arabic, Turkish)
  • Mohamed (Egyptian Arabic, Maghrebi Arabic, Dhivehi)
  • Mohamad (Arabic, Malay, Indonesian, Filipino, Maguindanao, Maranao)
  • Mahometus (Latinized Arabic form of the name)
  • Mahomet (anglicized form of Mahometus, an obsolete spelling)
  • Mehmet (Turkish)
  • Mehmed (Ottoman Turkish, Bosnian)
  • Muhammet (Turkish)
  • Mamadou (Western African)
  • Muhammadu (Western African, Hausa, Fula)
  • Mahamadou (Western African
  • Mamadu (Western African)
  • Mochamad (Indonesian)
  • Mochammad (Indonesian)
  • Muhamad (Indonesian, Malay, Avar)
  • Muhamed (Bosnian)
  • Muhamet (Albanian)
  • Məhəmməd (Azerbaijani)
  • Məmməd (Azerbaijani)
  • Mahammad (Azerbaijani)
  • Mokhmad (Chechen)
  • Magomed (Chechen, Avar)
  • Magomet (Chechen, Avar, Ossetian)
  • Mukhamed (Kazakh)
  • Mukhammed (Kazakh)
  • Mihemed (Kurdish)
  • Makhamat (Ossetian)
  • Maxamed (Somali, Eastern African)
  • Muhemmet (Uyghur)

Alanis

Alanis is a feminine form of Alan, a name of uncertain etymology and meaning. It comes from an old Breton name, brought to England by the Normans. It could have originated from the name of a Celtic god, Alaunus, a god of healing and prophecy. The name may possibly be derived from Proto-Celtic *aleti (to grow, nourish) via PIE root word *h₂el- (to grow, nourish).

Another possible meaning behind the name is “little rock” via Old Irish ail (rock, boulder) combined with the diminutive suffix -an; or possibly meaning “handsome” via Old Irish álaind (beautiful; lovely, fine, splendid).

Incidentally, the Alans (Alani in Latin) is the name of an Iranian nomadic tribe in the north area of the Caucasus. In this case, the name seems to have originated as a dialectal form of Old Iranian *aryana <aryan, used to refer to the Indo-Iranian people, which derives from the root word arya (noble), which ultimately derives from a Proto-Indo-Iranian source. It could be possible the name Alan is based from this.

Alanis is also a Spanish and Portuguese surname (spelled Alanís), a locational name for someone who came from Alanís, Seville. It seems the name derives from an Arabic origin but I could not find an exact meaning behind the name.

Origin: uncertain; Proto-Indo-Iranian; Arabic

Meaning: uncertain though it could be related to the name of a Celtic deity “to grow, nourish”; possibly “little rock” or “handsome”; “noble”; also a Spanish and Portuguese surname

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Alannis (English)
  • Alanna (English)
  • Alana (English)
  • Allana (English)
  • Alaina (English)
  • Alayna (English)
  • Allyn (English)
  • Alyn (English)
  • Allynne (English)
  • Alauda (Celtic goddess)

Male forms:

  • Alan (English, Scottish, Breton, French)
  • Allan (English, Scottish, Danish)
  • Allen (English, Scottish)
  • Allyn (English)
  • Alyn (English)
  • Alain (French)
  • Alen (Croatian, Slovene)
  • Ailín (Irish)
  • Alun (Welsh)
  • Alaunus (Celtic god)

Ghazi

Ghazi غَازِي is an Arabic male name meaning “warrior, champion, hero” and derives from a word referring to a Muslim warrior who fights against non-Muslims; ghazi is the active particle of ḡazā غَزَا (to raid, to attack, to wage war against; to overwhelm, overcome) derived from a root word related to intending to taking over. This was later adopted by several Ottoman Sultans as a title.

Ghazi is also an Arabic surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Arabic

Meaning: “warrior, champion, hero”

Usage: Arabic

Variants:

  • Gazi (Arabic, Ottoman Turkish)
  • Ghazy (Egyptian Arabic)

Asim

Asim عاسم is an Arabic male name meaning “protector”, as well as also being an Arabic surname originating from the given name.

Asim असीम is also an Indian male name meaning “boundless, limitless, endless” which derives from Sanskrit, made up of negative prefix a-(अ-) and sima सीम (limit, border).

Origin: Arabic; Sanskrit

Meaning: “protector” in Arabic; “boundless, limitless, endless” in Sanskrit

Usage: Arabic, Indian, Hindi, Bengali

Variants:

  • Assem (Arabic)
  • Aseem (Indian, Hindi)

Female forms:

  • Asima (Indian, Hindi, Arabic)

Gad

In the Old Testament Gad is the name of the first son of Jacob and Zilpah (his wife Leah’s handmaid) and his seventh son overall, and is the founder of one of the Israelite tribes named after him. The name comes from Hebrew gad (גָּד) meaning “luck” which seems to derive from an unknown origin. Gad could also be used as a nickname for Gadiel meaning “luck of God” or God is my luck”. 

Gad is also the name of a pan-Semitic god of fortune and seems to be related to the given name; perhaps the Gad in the Bible was named after this deity. Gad is also the name of a prophet or seer of King David

Gad also seems to be another Hebrew word for coriander

Gad (جاد) is also an Arabic male name, the Egyptian form of Jad meaning “earnest, serious”.

Gad is also a Navajo word meaning “juniper (tree)”.

Origin: Hebrew via an uncertain etymology; Arabic; Navajo

Meaning: a Hebrew male name “luck”; an Arabic male name “serious, earnest”; also a Navajo word “juniper” 

Usage: Hebrew, Arabic (Egyptian)

Pronunciation: gad or jad

Variants:

  • Gadiel (Hebrew)
  • Jad (Arabic)

Links:

Farooq

Farooq (فاروق) is a variant transcription of Faruq, an Arabic male name meaning “one who distinguishes right from wrong” and is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Arabic

Meaning: “one who distinguishes right from wrong”

Usage: Arabic, Indian, Urdu

Pronunciation: fa-rook (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Faruq (Arabic)
  • Farouk (Arabic)
  • Faruk (Arabic, Turkish)