Carl

Carl originated as the German form of Charles, the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Variants:

  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, English)
  • Carolus (Latinized Ancient Germanic)

Female forms:

  • Carla (German, Italian, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Croatian)

Karolina

Karolina is the Scandinavian and Slavic form of Caroline, the French form of Carolus which is the Latin form of Charles,the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”, those who were not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, German

Variants:

  • Karolína (Czech, Slovak)
  • Karolīna (Latvian)
  • Carolina (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Swedish, English)

Carly

Carly is a female given name, the feminine form of Carl which comes from Proto-Germanic *karilaz “free man”, of uncertain etymology. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”, someone who was not tied down to a master or land. 

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Karly (English)
  • Carlie (English)
  • Karlie (English)
  • Carlee (English)
  • Karlee (English)
  • Carley (English)
  • Carleigh (English)
  • Karleigh (English)
  • Carli (English)
  • Karli (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)

Carlos

Carlos is the Spanish and Portuguese form of Charles, which comes from Germanic Karl meaning “man” via Proto-Germanic *karilaz (free man, itself of uncertain etymology. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land.

Carlos is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

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Variants:

  • Charles (English, French)
  • Charlot (French)
  • Carolus (Latin)
  • Karolos (Greek)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Carles (Catalan)
  • Karlo (Croatian)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Karel (Dutch, Czech, Slovene)
  • Karol (Polish, Slovak, Slovene)
  • Kaarle (Finnish)
  • Kaarlo (Finnish)
  • Kale (Hawaiian)
  • Károly (Hungarian)
  • Séarlas (Irish)
  • Sjarel (Limburgish)
  • Karolis (Lithuanian)
  • Carol (Romanian)
  • Siarl (Welsh)
  • Xarles (Basque)

Female forms:

  • Carla (Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Italian, German, Dutch, English)
  • Karla (German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Charlotte (French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Charlotta (Swedish)
  • Charlene (English)
  • Charline (English)
  • Charlena (English)
  • Carlotta (Italian)
  • Carlota (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carline (English, French, Dutch, German)
  • Caroline (English, French, German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English Swedish)
  • Carly (English)

Charles

Charles comes from the Germanic name Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”, not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Charles is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: English, French

Nicknames: Charlie/Charley/Charlee

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Variants:

  • Charlot (French)
  • Carolus (Latin)
  • Karolos (Greek)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Carles (Catalan)
  • Karlo (Croatian)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Karel (Dutch, Czech, Slovene)
  • Karol (Polish, Slovak, Slovene)
  • Kaarle (Finnish)
  • Kaarlo (Finnish)
  • Kale (Hawaiian)
  • Károly (Hungarian)
  • Séarlas (Irish)
  • Sjarel (Limburgish)
  • Karolis (Lithuanian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carol (Romanian)
  • Siarl (Welsh)
  • Xarles (Basque)

Female forms:

  • Charlotte (French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Charlotta (Swedish)
  • Charlene (English)
  • Charline (English)
  • Charlena (English)
  • Carlotta (Italian)
  • Carlota (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carla (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Carline (English, French, Dutch, German)
  • Caroline (English, French, German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English Swedish)

Charlotte

Charlotte is the French feminine form of Charlot, which is the French male diminutive of Charles which comes from Germanic Karl meaning “man” via Proto-Germanic *karilaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Nicknames: Charlie/Charlee, Lottie

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Variants:

  • Charlotta (Swedish)
  • Charlene (English)
  • Charline (English)
  • Charlena (English)
  • Carlotta (Italian)
  • Carlota (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carla (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Carline (English, French, Dutch, German)
  • Caroline (English, French, German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English Swedish)

Male forms:

  • Charlot (French)
  • Carolus (Latin)
  • Karolos (Greek)
  • Charles (English, French)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Carles (Catalan)
  • Karlo (Croatian)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Karel (Dutch, Czech, Slovene)
  • Karol (Polish, Slovak, Slovene)
  • Kaarle (Finnish)
  • Kaarlo (Finnish)
  • Kale (Hawaiian)
  • Károly (Hungarian)
  • Séarlas (Irish)
  • Sjarel (Limburgish)
  • Karolis (Lithuanian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carol (Romanian)
  • Siarl (Welsh)

Carlton

Carlton comes from an English surname, originating as a locational name for someone who came from any of several places called Carlton, meaning “settlement of free peasants” or “settlement of free men”, composed of Old English ceorl (man; peasant) which was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants, and thus were not tied down to a lord or to the land; and tun (settlement, farm, enclosure) 

Origin: Proto-Germanic; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “settlement of free peasants” or “settlement of free men”

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Karlton (English)
  • Charlton (English)
  • Carleton (English)

Carla

Carla is the feminine form of Carlo (Italian), Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese), and Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English), all of which come from Charles, an English and French name derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch

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Variants:

  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, English)
  • Carly (English)
  • Carley (English)
  • Carlie (English)
  • Carli (English)
  • Karly (English)
  • Karlee (English)
  • Carlene (English)
  • Carline (English)
  • Karlene (English)
  • Carlita (Spanish & Portuguese diminutive of Carla)

Male forms:

  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)

Carlotta

Carlotta is the Italian form of Charlotte, itself the French feminine form of Charles which ultimately comes from Karl, a Germanic masculine name meaning “man”, used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, not tied down to the land or master and thus able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Italian

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Variants:

  • Carla (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Dutch, English)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Charlotte (French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Charlotta (Swedish)

Male forms:

  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish)
  • Charles (French, English)
  • Carlitos (Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Carlito (Spanish, Portuguese)

Harper

Harper is an English surname, an occupational name for someone who either made harps or played one for a living. The name comes from Old English hearpere (harper, harpist) via Old English hearpe (harp) via Proto-Germanic *harpǭ (harp) which derives from an uncertain origin.

Origin: Proto-Germanic via an uncertain origin

Meaning: “harpist”, in reference to one who plays the harp

Usage: English

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Charlie

Charlie is often used as a nickname for Charles and its feminine forms Charlotte and CharleneCharles is the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Charley (English)
  • Charlee (English)
  • Charleigh (English)

Carolyn

Carolyn is an English female name, a variant of Caroline, the French form of Carolus which is the Latin form of Charles, the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”.

However, since Carolyn is the feminine form of the name would that make its meaning “woman” instead? I’m not sure.

Carolyn could also be a combination of Carol (which is not only a shortened form of Caroline but is also an English word meaning “joyful song or ballad” borrowed from Ancient Greek khoraules “one who accompanies a chorus on a flute” from Greek khoros “dance, choir”, of uncertain origin; and aulos “flute”) combined with Lyn, a variant of Welsh llyn meaning “lake” via a Proto-Celtic origin.

Origin: Proto-Germanic; Proto-Celtic

Meaning: “free man”; a combination of Carol and Lyn “joyful song + lake”

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Carolynn (English)
  • Carolynne (English)
  • Caroline (French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish)
  • Karolyn (English)
  • Karolynne (English)
  • Karoline (Danish, German, Norwegian)
  • Karolina (Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, German)
  • Carola (Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish)
  • Carla (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch)
  • Carol (English, Romanian)