Nita

Nita as an English name originated as a shortened form of names ending in nita such as Anita (a diminutive of Ana/Anna meaning “favor, grace” which ultimately derives from a Proto-Semitic root word), Juanita (diminutive of Juana, the Spanish equivalent of Joanna, the feminine form of John “Yahweh is gracious”); or Bonita, a Spanish/Portuguese word meaning “pretty, beautiful” which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Nita is also an Indian female name meaning “modest, correct, well-behaved” and “led, guided”.

Nita is also a Choctaw word meaning ‘bear”

Origin: Proto-Semitic; Hebrew; Proto-Indo-European; Choctaw

Meaning: a nickname for Anita “grace, favor”, Juanita “Yahweh is gracious”, or Bonita “pretty, beautiful”; an Indian female name “modest, correct, well-behaved” and “led, guided”; a Choctaw word “bear”

Usage: English, Indian, Marathi, Choctaw

Variants:

  • Neeta (Indian, Marathi)
  • Nitha (Indian, Marathi)
  • Neetha (Indian, Marathi)

Ertuğrul

Ertuğrul is a Turkish male name, the name of the father of Osman I, founder of the Ottoman Empire. The name is composed of Turkish er (man) and tuğrul (referring to a mythical bird of prey, perhaps based on a falcon).

Ertuğrul is also a Turkish surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Turkic

Meaning: “man + bird of prey”, possibly in reference to a falcon”

Usage: Turkish

Pronunciation: in Turkish the ğ is a silent letter so Ertuğrul in Turkish is pronounced as er-tu-rel (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Tuğrul (Turkish)

Ertuğrul ارطغرل‎ (Arabic)

Kazeo

Kazeo is a Japanese male name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

kaze

“wind”

o

  • “male”
  • “cord; thong; string”
  • “tail; foot of a mountain”

There are likely other meaning depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s かぜお.

Origin: Japanese

Meaning: various depending on the kanji used

Usage: Japanese

Tanvi

Tanvi is an Indian female name meaning “slender, thin” or “delicate” which comes from Sanskrit tanu तनु (thin, slender) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “slender, thin” or “delicate”

Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi

Variants:

  • Tanu (Indian, Hindi)

Marian

Marian is probably a name many will associate with Maid Marian, a heroine in English folklore and the love interest of Robin Hood. Marian is an English female name, a variant of Marion, itself a medieval French diminutive of Marie, which ultimately derives from Hebrew Miriam,  a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

It’s also possible that Marian could be considered as a combination of the names Mary and Ann (“favor, grace”)

Marian is also a Polish, Czech, and Romanian male given name, in this case derived from Marianus, a derivative of Marius, a Roman family name on uncertain etymology and meaning. It’s been linked to Mars, the Roman god of war, but also as a masculine form of Maria (the Latinate form of Miriam) or from Latin mare “sea”, maria being its plural form. It’s also been linked to Latin mas “man, male”, but ultimately Marius may have originated from a Sabine origin.

Marian is also a Romanian, English, and French surname originating from the given name.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: a diminutive of Mary, meaning uncertain though various meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, “wished for child”, “beloved” or “love”; a combination of Mary + Ann “favor, grace”; possibly from Latin “sea” or “man, manly”; may also be related to the Roman god of war, Mars

Usage: English (female only), Polish, Czech, Romanian, German (male)

Variants:

  • Marion (French, English)
  • Marianne (French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Marielle (French)
  • Mariette (French)
  • Marise (French)
  • Maryse (French)
  • Manon (French, Dutch)
  • Mariana (Ancient Roman, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Bulgarian)

Male forms:

  • Marián (Czech, Slovak, Hungarian)
  • Marion (English)
  • Marianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Marius (Ancient Roman, German, Romanian, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French, Lithuanian, English)
  • Mariano (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Mario (Italian, Spanish, German, Croatian)

Kendra

Kendra seems to be a feminine form of Kenneth, itself an anglicized form of two Scottish Gaelic names:

  • the first is Coinneach meaning “handsome, fair, beautiful” via Gaelic caoin (handsome);
  • the second is Cináed, a name of uncertain etymology though the second element seems to be derived from Old Irish áed “fire” < Proto-Celtic *aidus which ultimately derives from a PIE root word. The first element may be derived from Irish cion (love, affection; regard, esteem), so the name would essentially mean “beloved of Aodh”, Aodh being the god of the underworld;
  • Cináed may also possibly be related to Ciniod, a Pictish name with a very different origin. Though the first element is uncertain, the second element seems to be related to Proto-Brythonic *jʉð (lord, judge).

Kendra could also be a feminine form of Kendrick which in this case comes from an English, Welsh, and Scottish surname with a few possible meanings such as (respectively) “royal power”, “chief hero” or “great champion”, or “son of Henry“.

It’s also likely that Kendra could have been inspired as a smoosh of Ken/Kenneth and Sandra, a shortened form of Alexandra or Alessandra meaning “defending men” or “defender of men”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain

Meaning: “handsome, fair, beautiful”; possibly “beloved of Aodh”; may also be related to a Pictish name, the second element possibly meaning “lord”; “royal power”, “chief hero” or “great champion”, or “son of Henry”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Kenna (Scottish)
  • Kenina (Scottish)

Male forms:

  • Kenneth (Scottish, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)
  • Kennith (English)
  • Kennet (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)
  • Coinneach (Scottish)
  • Cináed (Scottish, Irish)

Carl

Carl originated as the German form of Charles, the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Variants:

  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, English)
  • Carolus (Latinized Ancient Germanic)

Female forms:

  • Carla (German, Italian, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Croatian)

Alanis

Alanis is a feminine form of Alan, a name of uncertain etymology and meaning. It comes from an old Breton name, brought to England by the Normans. It could have originated from the name of a Celtic god, Alaunus, a god of healing and prophecy. The name may possibly be derived from Proto-Celtic *aleti (to grow, nourish) via PIE root word *h₂el- (to grow, nourish).

Another possible meaning behind the name is “little rock” via Old Irish ail (rock, boulder) combined with the diminutive suffix -an; or possibly meaning “handsome” via Old Irish álaind (beautiful; lovely, fine, splendid).

Incidentally, the Alans (Alani in Latin) is the name of an Iranian nomadic tribe in the north area of the Caucasus. In this case, the name seems to have originated as a dialectal form of Old Iranian *aryana <aryan, used to refer to the Indo-Iranian people, which derives from the root word arya (noble), which ultimately derives from a Proto-Indo-Iranian source. It could be possible the name Alan is based from this.

Alanis is also a Spanish and Portuguese surname (spelled Alanís), a locational name for someone who came from Alanís, Seville. It seems the name derives from an Arabic origin but I could not find an exact meaning behind the name.

Origin: uncertain; Proto-Indo-Iranian; Arabic

Meaning: uncertain though it could be related to the name of a Celtic deity “to grow, nourish”; possibly “little rock” or “handsome”; “noble”; also a Spanish and Portuguese surname

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Alannis (English)
  • Alanna (English)
  • Alana (English)
  • Allana (English)
  • Alaina (English)
  • Alayna (English)
  • Allyn (English)
  • Alyn (English)
  • Allynne (English)
  • Alauda (Celtic goddess)

Male forms:

  • Alan (English, Scottish, Breton, French)
  • Allan (English, Scottish, Danish)
  • Allen (English, Scottish)
  • Allyn (English)
  • Alyn (English)
  • Alain (French)
  • Alen (Croatian, Slovene)
  • Ailín (Irish)
  • Alun (Welsh)
  • Alaunus (Celtic god)

Dagmar

Dagmar is a Scandinavian and German female name meaning “day maid” made up of Old Norse elements dagr (day) < Proto-Germanic *dagaz which derives from an uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to PIE root *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn); and mær (maid, girl; and, in a more poetic sense, daughter).

I’ve also seen Dagmar listed as being an Old Danish form of Slavic Dragomira, the feminine form of Dragomir meaning “dear, precious + peace; world”

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Proto-Slavic

Meaning: “day maid”; could also have originated from Slavic Dragomira “dear, precious + peace; world”

Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak

Variants:

  • Dagmær (Ancient Scandinavian, Old Norse)
  • Dagmara (Polish)
  • Dagna (Polish)
  • Dagnė (Lithuanian)

Sven

Sven is a Scandinavian male name via Old Norse Sveinn, originally a byname meaning “boy, servant” via Proto-Germanic *swainaz (relative; kinsman; young man) which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Sven is also a Swedish word meaning “squire” or “page”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “boy”

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Estonian

Variants:

  • Svein (Norwegian)
  • Svend (Danish)
  • Sveinn (Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic)
  • Soini (Finnish)

Female forms:

  • Svenja (German)

Nicander

Nicander is the Latinized form of Ancient Greek Nikandros meaning “victory of man”, made up of Ancient Greek elements nike νῑ́κη (victory) which seems to derive from a pre-Greek origin; and andros ἀνδρός (man), the genitive singular of aner ᾰ̓νήρ.

Origin: Pre-Greek, Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “victory of man”

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Variants:

  • Nikandros (Ancient Greek)
  • Nikander (Latinized Ancient Greek)
  • Nicandre (French)
  • Nikandr (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Nikanor (Ancient Greek, Russian)
  • Nicanor (Latinized Ancient Greek, Spanish)
  • Nicanore (Italian)
  • Nicandro (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

Female variants:

  • Nicandra (Italian)
  • Nicanora (Italian, Spanish, Galician)

Indira

Indira is a Hindu female name meaning “beauty” and is another name for Lakshmi, the Hindu goddess of luck, prosperity, wealth and joy.

Origin: Sanskrit

Meaning: “beauty”

Usage: Hindu, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam, Marathi, Hindi, Odia

Variants:

  • Intira (Thai)