Sforza

Sforza comes from an Italian surname, famously associated with a ruling family in Renaissance Italy, in Milan, a powerful family from 1450 to 1535. The name comes from Italian sforzare meaning “to force; to strain”, from Vulgar Latin *exfortiare via ex- (out, away) and fortiare< fortiō< fortis (strong, powerful).

The name was occasionally used as a given name in Renaissance Italy.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “to force; to strain”

Usage: Medieval Italian

Maynard

Maynard comes from an English surname of Norman origin which derived from Germanic personal name Mainard, Meinard meaning “strength + hardy”, composed of Germanic elements magin (strength) and hard (brave, hardy).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “strength + brave, hardy”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Maynerd (English)
  • Mainard (English, French)
  • Meinard (Dutch)
  • Meindert (Dutch)
  • Meinhard (German)
  • Meginhard (German)

Ertuğrul

Ertuğrul is a Turkish male name, the name of the father of Osman I, founder of the Ottoman Empire. The name is composed of Turkish er (man) and tuğrul (referring to a mythical bird of prey, perhaps based on a falcon).

Ertuğrul is also a Turkish surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Turkic

Meaning: “man + bird of prey”, possibly in reference to a falcon”

Usage: Turkish

Pronunciation: in Turkish the ğ is a silent letter so Ertuğrul in Turkish is pronounced as er-tu-rel (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Tuğrul (Turkish)

Ertuğrul ارطغرل‎ (Arabic)

Clinton

Clinton comes from an English surname, a locational name referring to someone who came from a town called Glimpton in Oxfordshire meaning “settlement by the Glym river”, the name meaning “bright stream” in Brittonic; or it could be derived from Glinton, made up of Low Middle German glinde “enclosure”, “fence” + tun “enclosure, settlement”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-Europea

Meaning: “settlement by the Glym river” or “enclosure”, “fence” + “settlement, enclosure”

Usage: English

Nicknames: Clint

Yermolay

Yermolay is a Russian male name, the Russian form of Ancient Greek Hermolaos meaning “people of Hermes”, Hermes being the Greek god of commerce and trade, protector of thieves, and the messenger of the gods (ultimately the name derives from an uncertain origin) combined with laos “people”.

Origin: uncertain; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “people of Hermes”

Usage: Russian

Variants:

  • Yermolai (Russian)
  • Ermolai (Russian)
  • Hermolaos (Ancient Greek)

Kazeo

Kazeo is a Japanese male name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

kaze

“wind”

o

  • “male”
  • “cord; thong; string”
  • “tail; foot of a mountain”

There are likely other meaning depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s かぜお.

Origin: Japanese

Meaning: various depending on the kanji used

Usage: Japanese

Osamu

Osamu is a Japanese male name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

  • “discipline; study; conduct oneself well”
  • “reign; govern, administer”
  • “logic, reason”
  • “income; obtain; reap; pay”
  • “relationship; control; rule”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s おさむ and オサム in katakana.

Origin: Japanese

Meaning: a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used

Usage: Japanese

Lyall

Lyall comes from a Scottish surname via an Old Norse name, Liulfr. The second element derives from Old Norse úlfr meaning “wolf” while the first element of the name remains uncertain.

It’s also possible that Lyall originated as a pet-form of Lionel or Lyon, both meaning “lion”; it derives from Latin leō < Ancient Greek léōn which derives from an uncertain origin; it’s possible it could have been adopted from a non Indo-European source, perhaps from Proto-Semitic *labiʾ-, *labuʾ.

Incidentally, Lyall is a homophone of Lyle (which has a totally different etymology and means “island”).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain, possibly from a Proto-Semitic origin

Meaning: a shortened form of an Old Norse name “wolf”; could also have originated as a pet-form of Lionel or Lyon “lion”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Lyell (English)

Marian

Marian is probably a name many will associate with Maid Marian, a heroine in English folklore and the love interest of Robin Hood. Marian is an English female name, a variant of Marion, itself a medieval French diminutive of Marie, which ultimately derives from Hebrew Miriam,  a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

It’s also possible that Marian could be considered as a combination of the names Mary and Ann (“favor, grace”)

Marian is also a Polish, Czech, and Romanian male given name, in this case derived from Marianus, a derivative of Marius, a Roman family name on uncertain etymology and meaning. It’s been linked to Mars, the Roman god of war, but also as a masculine form of Maria (the Latinate form of Miriam) or from Latin mare “sea”, maria being its plural form. It’s also been linked to Latin mas “man, male”, but ultimately Marius may have originated from a Sabine origin.

Marian is also a Romanian, English, and French surname originating from the given name.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: a diminutive of Mary, meaning uncertain though various meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, “wished for child”, “beloved” or “love”; a combination of Mary + Ann “favor, grace”; possibly from Latin “sea” or “man, manly”; may also be related to the Roman god of war, Mars

Usage: English (female only), Polish, Czech, Romanian, German (male)

Variants:

  • Marion (French, English)
  • Marianne (French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Marielle (French)
  • Mariette (French)
  • Marise (French)
  • Maryse (French)
  • Manon (French, Dutch)
  • Mariana (Ancient Roman, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Bulgarian)

Male forms:

  • Marián (Czech, Slovak, Hungarian)
  • Marion (English)
  • Marianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Marius (Ancient Roman, German, Romanian, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French, Lithuanian, English)
  • Mariano (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Mario (Italian, Spanish, German, Croatian)

Rafer

Rafer is a male given name originating as a pet-form of either Rafferty, an Irish surname meaning “flood tide” or “abundance, prosperity”; or Raphael/Rafael meaning “God has healed” or “God heals”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Hebrew

Meaning: originally a pet-form of either Rafferty “flood tide” or “abundance, prosperity” or Raphael/Rafael “God has healed”, “God heals”

Usage: English

Pronunciation: not sure. It could be either ray-fer or raffer