Chadwick

Chadwick comes from an English surname, a locational name derived from any of several places called Chadwick. The name means “Chad’s settlement” or “village belonging to Chad”- Chad is the modern form of Old English Ceadda, a name of unknown meaning though it’s been linked to Welsh cad meaning “battle, army” via Proto-Celtic *katus (battle) deriving from a PIE root word; combined with Old English wīc (village).

Origin: uncertain; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “Chad’s settlement” or “village belonging to Chad”

Usage: English

Nicknames: Chad

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Harry

Harry is the medieval English form of Henry, which comes from Germanic Heimrich meaning “home ruler” , made up of Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (power, ruler), both deriving from a PIE origin. Harry could also be used as a nickname for Harold meaning “army ruler” or “army power”.

Harry is also an English surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “home ruler”; could also be used as a nickname for Harold “army ruler” or “army power”

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Henry (English)
  • Harold (English)
  • Hank
  • Hal

Harold

Harold comes from Old English Hereweald meaning “army ruler” or “army power”, made up of Old English elements here (army) and weald (ruler; might, power; authority) both derived from a PIE origin.

Harold is also an English surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “army ruler”

Usage: English

Nicknames: Harry, Rold, Hal

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Variants:

  • Hereweald (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Haraldr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Harald (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German)
  • Haraldur (Icelandic)
  • Hariwald (Ancient Germanic)
  • Chariovalda (Ancient Germanic)
  • Aroldo (Italian)