Ertuğrul

Ertuğrul is a Turkish male name, the name of the father of Osman I, founder of the Ottoman Empire. The name is composed of Turkish er (man) and tuğrul (referring to a mythical bird of prey, perhaps based on a falcon).

Ertuğrul is also a Turkish surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Turkic

Meaning: “man + bird of prey”, possibly in reference to a falcon”

Usage: Turkish

Pronunciation: in Turkish the ğ is a silent letter so Ertuğrul in Turkish is pronounced as er-tu-rel (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Tuğrul (Turkish)

Ertuğrul ارطغرل‎ (Arabic)

Rukia

Rukia will be familiar for many fans of the Bleach manga as the name of one of its main characters, Rukia Kuchiki. Although it’s written with the katakana ルキア, according to its author Tite Kubo he seems to have based it on Latin Lucia meaning “light” (*interesting fact for those who don’t know but in the Japanese language there isn’t an L sound, often being transliterated as an R sound).

However, Rukia can also be written with various kanji with various meanings such as:

ru

  • “flow, current”
  • “precious stone; gem; lapis lazuli”
  • “detain; fasten, halt”

ki

  • “hollyhock”
  • “rare, unusual”
  • “rare, uncommon; hope; beg, request”

a

  • “Asia; second, ranking next”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s るきあ.

Rukia could also be used as a variant spelling of Ruqayya, an Arabic female name meaning “spell, enchantment, charm” or “rise, ascent”.

Rukia is also the name of a genus of birds in the white-eye family. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find the meaning nor origin behind the name.

Origin: Japanese, Arabic

Meaning: a variety of meanings depending in the kanji used; also a variant transcription of Ruqqaya “spell, enchantment, charm” or “rise, ascent”; also the name of a genus of birds

Usage: Japanese, Arabic

Variants:

  • Ruqqaya (Arabic
  • Ruqqayah (Arabic)
  • Ruqaya (Arabic)
  • Ruqaiya (Arabic)
  • Ruqaiyyah (Arabic)
  • Roghayeh (Persian)
  • Rukiye (Turkish)
  • Rukiya (Arabic)- Rukiya is also a Japanese male name

Kanna

Kanna is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

kan

  • “bookmark”
  • “ring, circle, wheel”
  • “tolerant, lenient, generous”
  • “god, deity”
  • “citrus fruit”
  • “joy, delight, pleasure”
  • “daring, brave, bold”

na

  • “greens, vegetables”
  • “what”
  • “Nara; what”
  • “calm, lull” (na(gi)
  • “south”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s かんな while it can also be written in katakana as カンナ.

Kanna (寛和) is also the name of a Japanese era that lasted for two years (985-987). The kanji that make up the name can also be read as Hirokazu meaning “gentleness, harmony”, as well as the name of a type of Japanese plane, a wood-working tool.

Kanna (also spelled channa and canna) is also the name of a succulent plant in South Africa (also known as Sceletium tortuosum) that has been used for centuries as a mood enhancer, able to relieve stress and anxiety as well as induce feelings of euphoria; and can be either smoked, chewed, or brewed as a tea. The kanna plant is also known as Kougoed in Afrikaans meaning “something to chew” or “a thing to chew on”.

Kanna is also another name for Platysace cirrosa (also known as karna), a perennial herb found in Western Australia. Kanna is the Noongar name for the plant, the Noongar being Aboriginal Australians.

Kanna (also known as ganna) is also another name for Caroxylon aphyllum, a species of shrub found in the Karoo region of South Africa.

Kanna is also the name of a town in ancient Lycaonia (what is now modern-day Turkey) as well as the name of a village in southern Poland.

Kanna is also the Haitian Creole word for “duck”.

Origin: Japanese

Meaning: a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used; also the name of a Japanese era and a Japanese plane (wood-working tool); the name of a succulent plant in S. Africa and a shrub, a perennial herb in W. Australia, as well as the name name of a town in Ancient Lycaonia and a village in Poland; also a Haitian Creole word “duck”

Usage: Japanese

Galla

Galla is an Ancient Roman cognomen, the feminine form of Gallus which has a few possible meanings depending on its etymology:

  • the most popular is that it comes from the Latin word gallus meaning “rooster, cock” which ultimately derives from a PIE root word;
  • Gallus was also used to refer to someone who came from Gaul (Gallia in Latin), a region which now comprises France, Belgium, and parts of Germany and Italy; the name derives from Proto-Germanic *walhaz (foreigner) which may have originated from Latin Volcae, the name of a Celtic tribe which may possibly be derived from Proto-Celtic *wolkos (hawk), a word of uncertain origin (the Welsh word gwalch “hawk” derives from this) though perhaps related to Latin falco (falcon). It’s also been linked to Proto-Celtic *ulkʷos (wolf), seemingly because the Volcae fought with huge dogs, but that doesn’t seem as likely;
  • Incidentally, a gallus is also a eunuch priest of the Phrygian goddess Cybele and may be derived from a Phrygian origin;
  • Galla was also the name given to the Oromo people, an ethnic group in Ethiopia and Kenya, a word that the Oromo people consider derogatory;
  • Galla is also a Latin word meaning “oak-apple” (also known as an oak gall), derived from an uncertain origin;
  • Galla is also a surname, originating from the given name Gallus or as a nickname; it’s also an Indian surname, a variant of Kalla which seems to derive from a Telugu source.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain

Meaning: “rooster, cock”; originally referred to an inhabitant of Gaul “Gaul” or “Gallic”; also a Latin word “oak-apple”. Also the name of a eunuch priest dedicated to the goddess Cybele, as well as a derogatory word used to refer to the Oromo, an ethnic group in Ethiopia and Kenya

Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish

Variants:

  • Gala (Spanish)
  • Gal·la (Catalan)

Male forms:

  • Gallus (Ancient Roman)
  • Galo (Spanish)
  • Gallo (Italian)
  • Havel (Czech, Slovak)
  • Gál (Hungarian)
  • Gal (Slovene)
  • Gaweł (Polish)

Corby

Corby comes from an English surname with three possible meanings depending on its etymology:

  • the first is that it comes from a locational origin, any of several places called Corby. It’s made up from Old Norse personal name Kori (which seems to be the Old Norse form of Irish cuire “troop, band, company”) combined with býr (settlement, farm) although the one in Cumbria has its first element derived from Old Irish personal name Corc;
  • it’s also possible Corby originated as a diminutive of French corb meaning “raven”;
  • it may also have originated as variant of Irish surname Corboy, the anglicized spelling of Gaelic Mac Corrbuidhe meaning “son of Corrbuidhe”, the latter a byname made up of Irish corr (crane) and buidhe (yellow)

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Proto-Celtic

Meaning: “Kori’s farm” or “Kori’s settlement”, or “Corc’s farm/settlement”; a diminutive of French corb “raven”; a variant of Irish surname Corboy “crane+ yellow”

Usage: English

Variants:

Osman

Osman is the Turkish and Kurdish form of Uthman, an Arabic male name meaning “baby bustard” (bustards are large terrestrial birds that live in dry grasslands and steppes). Osman I was the founder of the Ottoman Empire.

Osman is also a surname- a Turkish surname originating from the given name, but it’s also an English surname, a variant of Anglo-Saxon Osmær meaning “god + fame”, made up of Old English os (god) and maer (fame), though it may also be a variant of Osmond “god + protection”.

Origin: Arabic; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “baby bustard”; also an English surname “god + fame” or “god + protection”

Usage: Turkish, Kurdish, English

Variants:

  • Uthman (Arabic)
  • Othman (Arabic, Malay)
  • Usman (Urdu)
  • Ousmane (Western African)
  • Cismaan (Eastern African, Somali)
  • Cusmaan (Eastern African, Somali)
  • Osmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Osmond (Anglo-Saxon, English)

Arden

Arden comes from an English surname, a locational name for someone who came from Arden in Warwickshire or the one from North Yorkshire. The name seems to derive from a Celtic source, via Celtic *ardwo meaning “high”. Another possible meaning I’ve seen listed for Arden as a surname is “eagle valley”, made up of Old English elements earn (eagle) and dene (valley).

Arden is also a Spanish word, the third person plural or arder meaning “to burn”, derived from Latin ardere

Arden is the name of several places in England, including the Forest of Arden located in Warwickshire; the Forest of Arden is the main setting used in William Shakespeare’s play As You Like It (1599), which may have been based on the Ardennes, a heavily forested, hilly region spread out among France, Germany, Luxembourg, and Belgium, which may derive from the same Celtic root word as above. 

Origin: uncertain, either from a Celtic or a Proto-Indo-European source

Meaning: as an English surname it seems to derive from a Celtic source “high”, though it may also mean “eagle valley”; also a Spanish word “they burn”

Usage: English

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Penny

Penny is often used as nickname for Penelope, the name of the faithful wife of Odysseus in Greek mythology. Her name is of uncertain origin though it’s been linked to Ancient Greek penelops πηνέλοψ, referring to a type of duck. It’s also been linked to Ancient Greek pene πήνη (thread, weft) and ops ὄψ (eye, face), which is a more fitting meaning for the character in Greek mythology: Penelope, the wife of Odysseus, who was apparently faithful to him for the twenty years he was gone despite the many persistant suitors who attempt to woo her with marriage. In an attempt to ward off their persistance, Penelope tells them that she will choose a suitor when she has finished weaving a burial shroud for Odysseus, though every night she undoes some of it to give her more time. This goes on for 3 years before her trick is discovered.

Penelope (or Penelopeia) is also the name of a dryad, the daughter of Dryops and portrayed as the mother of Pan, the god of shepherds and hunters.

Penny is the name of the one-cent coin in the U.S., derived from an Old English word, penning, pennig (penny) via Proto-Germanic *panningaz which derives from an unknown origin.

Penny is also an English surname originating as a nickname for someone who had some wealth (since coins weren’t very common when they were first introduced in England).

Origin: unknown, possibly from a pre-Greek origin; unknown

Meaning: a nickname for Penelope either referring to a type of bird or from Ancient Greek “thread, weft + face, eye”; penny is also the name of a one-cent coin

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Pennie (English)
  • Penni (English)
  • Penelope (Greek)
  • Pinelopi (Modern Greek)
  • Pénélope (French)
  • Penélope (Spanish, Portuguese)

Martin

Martin is a shortened form of Ancient Roman Martinus, a derivative of Mars, the Roman god of war (and the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology. It’s been linked to Latin mas meaning “man, male” of unknown origin though perhaps derived from a PIE root word meaning young man. However, it’s possible that Mars may be related to an older source, perhaps adopted from the Etruscan god Maris (the god of agriculture and fertility); this might be possible since Mars was also associated with agriculture and fertility.

Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers. Etruscan seems to be a pre-Indo-European language of which very little is known about; the Etruscan civilization was conquered and than assimilated by the Ancient Romans, and the Etruscan language eventually died out with very little of it left behind. The origin of both names is unknown, but Mavors could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”. Mars could also be derived from the same PIE root as Sanskrit marici “ray of light”, ultimately derived from PIE *mer- meaning “to die; to disappear”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, but the links are tenuous at best.

Martin is also the name of a type of bird related to the swallow- something about the bird migrating during the time of Martinmas (a festival celebrating St. Martin of Tours, a former Roman soldier who left and became the bishop of Tours). However, as an English surname it may have originated as a topographical name either meaning “settlement by the boundary” via Old English elements mǣre (boundary, border) and tūn (settlement) or “settlement by the lake” with the first element via Old English mere (sea, ocean; lake).

Origin: unknown, possibly Etruscan; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: from Ancient Roman Martinus “belonging to Mars”, a name of uncertain origin and meaning though various possible meanings attributed to it are “man, male”, “turner of the battle”, perhaps from PIE root word *mer- (to die), or related to Latin marceo “to (cause to) wither” or “to (make) shrivel”, or Latin marcus “hammer”- though all of them are tenuous; Martin is also an English surname, a locational name “settlement by the boundary” or “settlement by the lake”

Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Romanian, Russian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish, Spanish

Nicknames: Marty/Martie, Mart (Dutch), Tine (Slovene), Tinek (Slovene), Tin (Croatian), Matxin (Basque)

Variants:

  • Martinus (Ancient Roman, Dutch)
  • Maarten (Dutch)
  • Marten (Dutch)
  • Martijn (Dutch)
  • Merten (German)
  • Mårten (Swedish)
  • Morten (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Márton (Hungarian)
  • Martti (Finnish)
  • Mattin (Basque)
  • Martí (Catalan)
  • Máirtín (Irish)
  • Martino (Italian)
  • Martynas (Lithuanian)
  • Marcin (Polish)
  • Martim (Portuguese)
  • Martinho (Portuguese)
  • Martín (Spanish)
  • Martyn (Welsh, Ukrainian)

Female forms:

  • Martine (French, Dutch, Norwegian, English)
  • Martina (German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, Swedish, Ancient Roman)
  • Martyna (Polish)

Linda

Linda is a female given name which originated as a short form of Germanic names containing Germanic element lind, linde meaning “soft, tender” via Proto-Germanic *linþaz (bendsome, flexible; pliable; weak, soft, mild) derived from a PIE root word. I’ve also seen lind, linde associated with the linden tree or, more poetically, “dragon, serpent, snake”.

Linda is also a Spanish and Portuguese word meaning “pretty, beautiful”, the feminine singular form of lindo which derives from an uncertain etymology. It seems to come from an Old Spanish word which has been linked to Latin legitimus (lawful, proper) and limpidus (clear, bright), but it’s not certain.

Linda could also be used as a nickname for names ending in -linda such as Belinda, Delinda, Celinda, Melindaetc.

In the Kalevipoeg (1861), an Estonian national epic poem written by Estonian writer Friedrich Reinhold Kreutzwald (based on Estonian mythology and various folk legends of Estonia) Linda is the mother of the hero Kalevipoeg; in this case her name comes from the Estonian word lind meaning “bird” via Proto-Finnic *lintu (bird) from Proto-Uralic *lunta (bird; goose).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Proto-Uralic; uncertain etymology

Meaning:  various depending on its usage- as an English name it comes from a shortened form of Germanic element lind, linde “soft, tender”, has also been associated with the lime/linden tree and, more poetically, “dragon, serpent, snake”; is also used as a nickname for names ending in -linda; also a Spanish and Portuguese word “pretty, beautiful”; also means “bird” in Estonian

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Estonian

Nicknames: Lin, Lindy/Lindi/Lindie

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Variants

  • Lynda (English)
  • Lindy (English)
  • Lindi (English)
  • Lyndi (English)
  • Lindie (English)
  • Lind (English)
  • Linde (Dutch)
  • Linza (Ancient Germanic)

Vega

Vega is the name of the brightest star in the constellation Lyra and the fifth brightest star in the night sky. The name derives from the Arabic phrase an-nasr al-wāqi النَّسْر الوَاقِع‎ meaning “the falling eagle”; nasr is the Arabic word for vulture (and eagle) which derives from a Proto-Semitic origin. Because Vega comes from the wāqi part, the name would actually mean “falling (eagle)”.

Vega is also a Spanish surname meaning “meadow” which seems to derive from a Basque origin; it originated as a locational name for someone who lived near a meadow or a fertile lowland. However, it’s also a Spanish female name which may have arisen from the Spanish title Nuestra Señora de la Vega (“Our Lady of the Meadow”)- Marian titles seem to be very popular among Spanish families.

Vēga (वेग) is also an Indian female name which comes from the word meaning “speed, velocity, momentum” derived from Sanskrit.

Origin: Arabic, Proto-Semitic; Basque; Sanskrit

Meaning: “the falling (eagle)” or “the falling (vulture)”; “meadow”; “speed, velocity, momentum”

Usage: Spanish, English, Indian, Hindi, Marathi

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