Contessa

Contessa is the Italian word for “countess”, the feminine equivalent of a count (or conte in Italian). The word derives from Latin come, comitem (companion, comrade; attendant), made up of Latin prefix com- (with) and (to go).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “countess”

Usage: English, Italian (word, although I’m not sure if this is used as a given name in Italy)

Variants:

  • Contessina (Italian diminutive of Contessa)

Clarion

Clarion was the name of a medieval trumpet used in the Middle Ages that was loud and shrill. A clarion call is an idiom referring to a call to action. The word comes from Old French claron< Latin clario (trumpet)< Latin clārus meaning “clear, bright, shining; renowned, famous” derived from PIE *kelh₁- (to call, shout), which is the same root word as the name Claire derives from.

Clarion is also a French surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: name of a medieval trumpet that was loud and shrill

Usage: English

Cleo

Cleo is an English unisex name which originated as a shortened form of names such as Cleopatra (an Ancient Greek female name meaning “glory of the father”) or Cleopas (a contracted form of Cleopatros, the masculine form of Cleopatra). It derives from the Ancient Greek element kleos κλέος (glory, fame).

Cleo could also have originated as a variant spelling of Clio which derives from the same source above; in Greek mythology, Clio is one of the nine Muses, the muse of history and heroic poetry.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “glory”

Usage: English

Female forms:

  • Clio (Latinized Ancient Greek)
  • Klio (Ancient Greek)
  • Clea (English, German, French)
  • Klea (English)
  • Clia (English)
  • Klia (English)

Male forms:

  • Cleon (Latinized Ancient Greek)
  • Kleon (Ancient Greek)

Carly

Carly is a female given name, the feminine form of Carl which comes from Proto-Germanic *karilaz “free man”, of uncertain etymology. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”, someone who was not tied down to a master or land. 

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Karly (English)
  • Carlie (English)
  • Karlie (English)
  • Carlee (English)
  • Karlee (English)
  • Carley (English)
  • Carleigh (English)
  • Karleigh (English)
  • Carli (English)
  • Karli (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)

Charlotte

Charlotte is the French feminine form of Charlot, which is the French male diminutive of Charles which comes from Germanic Karl meaning “man” via Proto-Germanic *karilaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Nicknames: Charlie/Charlee, Lottie

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Variants:

  • Charlotta (Swedish)
  • Charlene (English)
  • Charline (English)
  • Charlena (English)
  • Carlotta (Italian)
  • Carlota (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carla (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Carline (English, French, Dutch, German)
  • Caroline (English, French, German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English Swedish)

Male forms:

  • Charlot (French)
  • Carolus (Latin)
  • Karolos (Greek)
  • Charles (English, French)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Carles (Catalan)
  • Karlo (Croatian)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Karel (Dutch, Czech, Slovene)
  • Karol (Polish, Slovak, Slovene)
  • Kaarle (Finnish)
  • Kaarlo (Finnish)
  • Kale (Hawaiian)
  • Károly (Hungarian)
  • Séarlas (Irish)
  • Sjarel (Limburgish)
  • Karolis (Lithuanian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carol (Romanian)
  • Siarl (Welsh)

Carla

Carla is the feminine form of Carlo (Italian), Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese), and Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English), all of which come from Charles, an English and French name derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch

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Variants:

  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, English)
  • Carly (English)
  • Carley (English)
  • Carlie (English)
  • Carli (English)
  • Karly (English)
  • Karlee (English)
  • Carlene (English)
  • Carline (English)
  • Karlene (English)
  • Carlita (Spanish & Portuguese diminutive of Carla)

Male forms:

  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)

Celia

Celia is a female given name, the English form of Latin Caelia, the feminine form of Roman family name (or nomen) Caelius which derives from Latin caelum meaning “heaven” of uncertain origin; though it could be derived from a PIE origin.

It was used by William Shakespeare for one of his characters in As You Like It (1623), as well as also being used by English poet Edmund Spenser (1552/53-1599) in his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590, 1596).

Celia could also be used as a nickname for Cecilia, another name derived from a Roman family name, though in this case it derives from Latin caecus meaning “blind” via PIE *káykos (one-eyed, blind).

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: “heaven”; could also be a nickname for Cecilia “blind”

Usage: English, Spanish

Variants:

  • Caelia (Ancient Roman)
  • Célia (French, Portuguese)
  • Célie (French)
  • Cèlia (Catalan)
  • Ĉiela (Esperanto)
  • Silke (Dutch diminutive of Celia or Cecilia)
  • Selia (English)
  • Seelia (English)

Carlotta

Carlotta is the Italian form of Charlotte, itself the French feminine form of Charles which ultimately comes from Karl, a Germanic masculine name meaning “man”, used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, not tied down to the land or master and thus able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Italian

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Variants:

  • Carla (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Dutch, English)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Charlotte (French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Charlotta (Swedish)

Male forms:

  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish)
  • Charles (French, English)
  • Carlitos (Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Carlito (Spanish, Portuguese)

Cato

Cato is an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning “wise” in Latin <catus (clever, intelligent; cunning) <Proto-Italic *katos (clever, shrewd) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word meaning “to sharpen”. 

Cato is also a Dutch female name, originating as diminutive of Catharina, the Dutch and Swedish form of KatherineKatherine is the English form of Greek Aikaterine though the etymology behind the name is not certain. It could be derived from another Greek name, Hekaterine via hekateros meaning “each of the two” or from Hecatethe name of the Greek goddess of witchcraft, the underworld, and crossroads. Though her name is of uncertain meaning it’s often been associated with Greek hekas meaning “far away” so the name would essentially mean “one who works from afar” or “the far-reaching one”. It’s also been linked to Ancient Greek hekṓn meaning “will” or “willing”. It might also be derived from Greek aikia “torture”.

Katherine could also be from a Coptic name meaning “my consecration of your name”. The spelling of the name was later changed to be associated with Greek katharos “pure”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain

Meaning: an Ancient Roman cognomen “wise”; could also be derived from Katherinea name of uncertain etymology though possible “each of the two”, or derived from the name of Greek goddess Hecate “one who works from afar” or “the far-reaching one”; “will, willing”, “torture”; possibly from Coptic “my consecration of your name”, the spelling later changed to associate it with Greek katharos “pure”

Usage: Ancient Roman, Dutch, English

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Variants:

  • Kato (English)- also an Eastern African name with a different meaning/etymology as well as a Japanese surname

Charlie

Charlie is often used as a nickname for Charles and its feminine forms Charlotte and CharleneCharles is the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Charley (English)
  • Charlee (English)
  • Charleigh (English)

Carolyn

Carolyn is an English female name, a variant of Caroline, the French form of Carolus which is the Latin form of Charles, the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”.

However, since Carolyn is the feminine form of the name would that make its meaning “woman” instead? I’m not sure.

Carolyn could also be a combination of Carol (which is not only a shortened form of Caroline but is also an English word meaning “joyful song or ballad” borrowed from Ancient Greek khoraules “one who accompanies a chorus on a flute” from Greek khoros “dance, choir”, of uncertain origin; and aulos “flute”) combined with Lyn, a variant of Welsh llyn meaning “lake” via a Proto-Celtic origin.

Origin: Proto-Germanic; Proto-Celtic

Meaning: “free man”; a combination of Carol and Lyn “joyful song + lake”

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Carolynn (English)
  • Carolynne (English)
  • Caroline (French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish)
  • Karolyn (English)
  • Karolynne (English)
  • Karoline (Danish, German, Norwegian)
  • Karolina (Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, German)
  • Carola (Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish)
  • Carla (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch)
  • Carol (English, Romanian)

Claire

Claire is the French form of Clara, the feminine form of Late Latin Clarus via Latin clārus meaning “clear, bright, shining; renowned, famous” derived from PIE *kelh₁- (to call, shout).

Claire is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “clear, bright; famous”

Usage: French, English

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Variants:

  • Clara (Italian, English, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman)
  • Klara (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian)
  • Klára (Hungarian, Czech, Slovak)
  • Klāra (Latvian)
  • Chiara (Italian)
  • Chiarina (Italian diminutive of Chiara)
  • Claretta (Italian diminutive of Clara)
  • Clare (English)
  • Clarice (English)
  • Clarissa (English, Italian)

Male forms:

  • Clair (French)
  • Clarus (Late Roman)