Dagmar

Dagmar is a Scandinavian and German female name meaning “day maid” made up of Old Norse elements dagr (day) < Proto-Germanic *dagaz which derives from an uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to PIE root *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn); and mær (maid, girl; and, in a more poetic sense, daughter).

I’ve also seen Dagmar listed as being an Old Danish form of Slavic Dragomira, the feminine form of Dragomir meaning “dear, precious + peace; world”

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Proto-Slavic

Meaning: “day maid”; could also have originated from Slavic Dragomira “dear, precious + peace; world”

Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak

Variants:

  • Dagmær (Ancient Scandinavian, Old Norse)
  • Dagmara (Polish)
  • Dagna (Polish)
  • Dagnė (Lithuanian)

Mylo

Mylo is a variant spelling of Milo, an Old Germanic form of Miles. Although the meaning and etymology behind the name is unclear, it’s been linked to Slavic name element milu meaning “gracious, dear”; Miles has also been linked to Latin word mīles meaning “soldier; knight”, a word that derives from an unknown origin, possibly Etruscan, but that seems to be more of a folk etymology than actual fact.

Milo is also the Latinized form of Milon, an Ancient Greek male name meaning “yew”; Milo (Milon) of Croton was a famous wrestler in Ancient Greece in the 6th century, who had won several victories in the Olympic and Pythian Games, and his name became associated with extraordinary strength.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: uncertain though it’s been linked to a Slavic element “gracious, dear”, and has also been associated through folk etymology with Latin mīles “soldier; knight”; also a Latinized form of Ancient Greek Milon “yew”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Milo (English, Ancient Germanic)
  • Miles (English)
  • Myles (English)