Annette

Annette originated as a French diminutive of Anne < Anna meaning “favor, grace” via Hebrew root word hanan חנן (to be gracious, merciful, compassionate) which seems to be derived from a Proto-Semitic origin.

Origin: Proto-Semitic

Meaning: “favor, grace”

Usage: French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch

Variants:

Björn

Björn is a Swedish and Icelandic male name meaning “bear” via Old Norse bjǫrn (bear) via Proto-Germanic *berô (bear) via a PIE root word.

Björn is also a Swedish surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “bear”

Usage: Swedish, Icelandic, German, Dutch)

Pronunciation: b-yorn; Forvo

Variants:

  • Bjoern (German)
  • Bjørn (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Bjǫrn (Old Norse, Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Bjarni (Icelandic, Faroese, Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Bjarne (Danish, Norwegian, Swedish)

Sven

Sven is a Scandinavian male name via Old Norse Sveinn, originally a byname meaning “boy, servant” via Proto-Germanic *swainaz (relative; kinsman; young man) which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Sven is also a Swedish word meaning “squire” or “page”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “boy”

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Estonian

Variants:

  • Svein (Norwegian)
  • Svend (Danish)
  • Sveinn (Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic)
  • Soini (Finnish)

Female forms:

  • Svenja (German)

Rosalie

Rosalie is the French, German, and Dutch form of Latin Rosalia via rosa (rose) which comes via Ancient Greek rhodon (rose), a word which comes from an uncertain borrowing. It’s ultimately believed to be derived from Old Persian *vr̥da-(flower) though it may be derived from a Thracian source since the rose was native to Thrace.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: “rose”

Usage: French, German, Dutch, English

Variants:

  • Rosalee (English)
  • Rosaleigh (English)
  • Rosalia (Late Roman, Italian)
  • Rozalia (Polish, Romanian)
  • Rozálie (Czech)
  • Rozalie (Dutch)

Charlotte

Charlotte is the French feminine form of Charlot, which is the French male diminutive of Charles which comes from Germanic Karl meaning “man” via Proto-Germanic *karilaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Nicknames: Charlie/Charlee, Lottie

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Variants:

  • Charlotta (Swedish)
  • Charlene (English)
  • Charline (English)
  • Charlena (English)
  • Carlotta (Italian)
  • Carlota (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carla (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Carline (English, French, Dutch, German)
  • Caroline (English, French, German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English Swedish)

Male forms:

  • Charlot (French)
  • Carolus (Latin)
  • Karolos (Greek)
  • Charles (English, French)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Carles (Catalan)
  • Karlo (Croatian)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Karel (Dutch, Czech, Slovene)
  • Karol (Polish, Slovak, Slovene)
  • Kaarle (Finnish)
  • Kaarlo (Finnish)
  • Kale (Hawaiian)
  • Károly (Hungarian)
  • Séarlas (Irish)
  • Sjarel (Limburgish)
  • Karolis (Lithuanian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carol (Romanian)
  • Siarl (Welsh)

Carla

Carla is the feminine form of Carlo (Italian), Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese), and Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English), all of which come from Charles, an English and French name derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch

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Variants:

  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, English)
  • Carly (English)
  • Carley (English)
  • Carlie (English)
  • Carli (English)
  • Karly (English)
  • Karlee (English)
  • Carlene (English)
  • Carline (English)
  • Karlene (English)
  • Carlita (Spanish & Portuguese diminutive of Carla)

Male forms:

  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)

Cato

Cato is an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning “wise” in Latin <catus (clever, intelligent; cunning) <Proto-Italic *katos (clever, shrewd) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word meaning “to sharpen”. 

Cato is also a Dutch female name, originating as diminutive of Catharina, the Dutch and Swedish form of KatherineKatherine is the English form of Greek Aikaterine though the etymology behind the name is not certain. It could be derived from another Greek name, Hekaterine via hekateros meaning “each of the two” or from Hecatethe name of the Greek goddess of witchcraft, the underworld, and crossroads. Though her name is of uncertain meaning it’s often been associated with Greek hekas meaning “far away” so the name would essentially mean “one who works from afar” or “the far-reaching one”. It’s also been linked to Ancient Greek hekṓn meaning “will” or “willing”. It might also be derived from Greek aikia “torture”.

Katherine could also be from a Coptic name meaning “my consecration of your name”. The spelling of the name was later changed to be associated with Greek katharos “pure”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain

Meaning: an Ancient Roman cognomen “wise”; could also be derived from Katherinea name of uncertain etymology though possible “each of the two”, or derived from the name of Greek goddess Hecate “one who works from afar” or “the far-reaching one”; “will, willing”, “torture”; possibly from Coptic “my consecration of your name”, the spelling later changed to associate it with Greek katharos “pure”

Usage: Ancient Roman, Dutch, English

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Variants:

  • Kato (English)- also an Eastern African name with a different meaning/etymology as well as a Japanese surname

Victor

Victor comes from a Late Latin name via Latin victor meaning “conqueror; victor” as a noun and “victorious, triumphant, conquering” as an adjective, from Latin vincere (to win) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word.

The English word victor refers to the winner of a fight which derives from the Latin word. 

Victor is also a French and English surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “conqueror; victor”

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman

Nicknames: Vic

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Variants:

  • Viktor (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Vitya (Russian diminutive of Viktor)
  • Vicktor (English, Swedish)
  • Victorius (Late Roman)
  • Bittor (Basque)
  • Viktar (Belarusian)
  • Víctor (Catalan, Spanish)
  • Vítor (Galician, Portuguese)
  • Vihtori (Finnish)
  • Vittorio (Italian form of Victorius)
  • Vittore (Italian)
  • Viktors (Latvian)
  • Viktoras (Lithuanian)
  • Wiktor (Polish)
  • Gwythyr (Welsh)

Female forms:

  • Victoria (English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman)
  • Viktoria (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian)
  • Viktoriya (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Viktoriia (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Viktoryia (Belarusian)
  • Victòria (Catalan)
  • Vitória (Portuguese)
  • Viktorija (Lithuanian, Latvian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Wiktorija (Polish)
  • Victoire (French)
  • Viktorie (Czech)
  • Wikolia (Hawaiian)
  • Viktória (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Vittoria (Italian)
  • Latoya (African-American)

Philip

Philip comes from Ancient Greek Philippos, the name of several kings of Macedonia which may have popularized the name, and was popular among European royalty. Philip is also found in the New Testament, the name of one of the 12 Apostles as well as theme of one of the Seven deacons. The name comes from Ancient Greek Philippos meaning “lover of horses”, composed of Ancient Greek elements philos φῐ́λος (love, like) and hippos ῐ̔́ππος (horse), both derived from a PIE origin.

Philip is also an English surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “lover of horses”

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Nicknames: Phil, Pip, Flip (Dutch diminutive of Filip)

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Variants:

  • Philippos (Ancient Greek)
  • Philippus (Latinized Ancient Greek)
  • Filippos (Modern Greek)
  • Phillip (English)
  • Filip (Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Polish, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Romanian, Finnish)
  • Filippus (Dutch)
  • Vilppu (Finnish)
  • Felip (Catalan)
  • Felipe (Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese)
  • Filipe (Portuguese)
  • Filippu (Corsican)
  • Philippe (French)
  • Philipp (German)
  • Fülöp (Hungarian)
  • Pilib (Irish)
  • Filib (Scottish)
  • Filippo (Italian)
  • Filips (Latvian)
  • Pilypas (Lithuanian)
  • Piripi (Maori)
  • Filipp (Russian)
  • Pylyp (Ukrainian)

Female forms:

  • Philippa (English)
  • Philipa (English)
  • Pippa (English diminutive of Philippa)
  • Phillippa (English, German)
  • Philippina (German)
  • Philippine (French)
  • Filippa (Modern Greek, Swedish, Italian)
  • Filipa (Portuguese)
  • Filipina (Polish)
  • Felipa (Spanish)

Roland

Roland is the the name of a Frankish paladin who served under Charlemagne the Great, King of the Franks and Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, in the 8th century; according to legend, he is also depicted as Charlemagne‘s nephew. Roland was a popular figure in medieval Europe and there was even an epic poem (or chanson de gets in Old French) written about him, The Song of Roland (La Chanson de Roland) which depicts Roland’s final battle and death.

Roland is composed of Germanic elements hrod (fame) and land (land) essentially meaning “famous land”. I’ve also seen a few sites claim the second element deriving from nand meaning “brave”, but land seems more likely, essentially referring to someone who was famous throughout the land.

Roland is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “famous land” or it could be stretched out to mean “famous throughout the land”

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Polish, Medieval French

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Variants:

  • Rolland (English)
  • Rowland (English)
  • Rolin (French, English)
  • Roeland (Dutch)
  • Loránd (Hungarian)
  • Lóránt (Hungarian)
  • Hrodland (Ancient Germanic)
  • Orlando (Italian)
  • Rolando (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian)
  • Roldán (Spanish)
  • Roldão (Portuguese)
  • Rolan (Russian)

Feminine forms:

  • Rolande (French)
  • Rolanda (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Orlanda (Italian)

Leo

Leo comes from the Latin word meaning “lion” via Ancient Greek leon which derives from an uncertain origin; it’s possible it could have been adopted from a non Indo-European source, perhaps from Proto-Semitic *labiʾ-, *labuʾ- (lion). The name might have originated as a nickname for someone who was courageous and brave.

Leo is the name of a constellation representing to the Ancient Greeks the Nemean lion killed by the Greek hero Herakles as part of his twelve labors. Leo is also a Zodiac sign belonging to those born between July 22nd to August 23rd; apparently those born under this sign are stubborn, loyal and trustworthy, assured, confident and ambitious, but prone to arrogance, jealousy, and bossiness.

Leo could also be used as a nickname for names such as Leonidas (an Ancient Greek name meaning “son of the lion” or “son of a lion”), Leopold (a Germanic name meaning “bold people”), and Leonard (meaning “brave lion”), or any name beginning with Leo.

Origin: uncertain, possibly from a Proto-Semitic source

Meaning: “lion”

Usage: Late Roman, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Croatian

Variants:

  • Leon (Greek, Ancient Greek, English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch)
  • Leontios (Ancient Greek)
  • Leontius (Ancient Greek, Latin)
  • Levon (Armenian)
  • Leoš (Czech)
  • Léo (French)
  • Léon (French)
  • Léonce (French form of Leontios)
  • Lionel (French diminutive of Léon; English)
  • Levan (Georgian)
  • Leone (Italian)
  • Leonzio (Italian form of Leontios)
  • Leonas (Lithuanian)
  • Lef (Polish cognate of Lev)
  • Lev (Russian)
  • Leonti (Russian)
  • Leontiy (Russian)
  • Leonty (Russian)
  • Lyov (Russian)
  • León (Spanish)
  • Leoncio (Spanish)
  • Leonius (Late Roman)

Female forms:

  • Leona (English, German, Czech)
  • Leola (English)
  • Leone (French, English)
  • Leontina (Italian, Late Roman)
  • Leonia (Late Roman)
  • Leonie (French, German, Dutch, English)
  • Léonie (French)
  • Léontine (French)
  • Léone (French)
  • Leontýna (Czech)
  • Leontyne (English)

Emma

Emma originated as a short form of names beginning with Germanic element ermin meaning “whole” or “universal”, derived from a Proto-Germanic origin of unknown etymology.

Emma is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Germanic, of unknown origin

Meaning: “whole, universal”

Usage: English, German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Ema (Spanish, Portuguese, Slovene, Slovak, Czech, Croatian)
  • Ima (Dutch, Ancient Germanic)
  • Irma (German, English, Dutch, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Lithuanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic)
  • Erma (English)
  • Emmalyn (English)
  • Emmalynne (English)
  • Emalyn (English)
  • Emmy (English)
  • Emmie (English)
  • Emmi (English, Finnish)

Male forms:

  • Emmett (English)
  • Emmott (English)
  • Emmet (English)