Bleuette

Bleuette is a French female name, a combination of the French word bleu “blue” combined with the diminutive suffix -ette, so the name would essentially mean “little blue”. Bleuette was the name of a doll produced in France from 1905 to 1960.

Spelled Bleuet, it’s the French word for “cornflower” and is also the Canadian French word for “blueberry”. In France, the bleuet de France is the national symbol of remembrance for veterans, victims of war, widows, and orphans.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “little blue (one)”; spelled Bleuet it means “cornflower” in French and is the Canadian French word for “blueberry”

Usage: French

Variants:

  • Bleuet (French)

Annette

Annette originated as a French diminutive of Anne < Anna meaning “favor, grace” via Hebrew root word hanan חנן (to be gracious, merciful, compassionate) which seems to be derived from a Proto-Semitic origin.

Origin: Proto-Semitic

Meaning: “favor, grace”

Usage: French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch

Variants:

Pascale

Pascale is a French female name, the feminine form of Pascal which comes from Late Latin Paschalis “relating to Easter”, itself a derivative of pascha “Passover” via Ancient Greek páskha (Passover) via Aramaic pasḥā פַּסְחָא via a Hebrew root word.

Pascale is also an Italian and French surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Hebrew

Meaning: “Easter”, “Passover”

Usage: French

Variants:

  • Pascaline (French diminutive of Pascale)
  • Pasqualina (Italian)
  • Pascuala (Spanish)
  • Pasqua (Italian)

Male forms:

  • Pascal (French, German, Dutch)
  • Paschal
  • Pasquale (Italian)
  • Pasqualino (Italian diminutive of Pasquale)
  • Pascual (Spanish)
  • Paskal (Bulgarian, Macedonian)
  • Pasco (Cornish)
  • Paškal (Croatian)
  • Paško (Croatian diminutive of Paškal)
  • Paschalis (Late Roman, Greek)

Rosalie

Rosalie is the French, German, and Dutch form of Latin Rosalia via rosa (rose) which comes via Ancient Greek rhodon (rose), a word which comes from an uncertain borrowing. It’s ultimately believed to be derived from Old Persian *vr̥da-(flower) though it may be derived from a Thracian source since the rose was native to Thrace.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: “rose”

Usage: French, German, Dutch, English

Variants:

  • Rosalee (English)
  • Rosaleigh (English)
  • Rosalia (Late Roman, Italian)
  • Rozalia (Polish, Romanian)
  • Rozálie (Czech)
  • Rozalie (Dutch)

Josette

Josette originated as a French diminutive of Joséphine, the French form of Josephine, the feminine form of Joseph which derives from Hebrew Yosef meaning “(God) will add” derived from a root word meaning “add, increase”. 

Origin: Hebrew

Meaning: “(God) will add”, essentially referring to prosperity and abundance

Usage: French, English

Variants:

  • Josetta (English, Italian)
  • Josiane (French diminutive of Joséphine)
  • Giosetta (Italian) 
  • Joséphine (French)
  • Josephine (French, English)
  • Josèphe (French)
  • Josée (French)

Male forms:

  • Joseph (English, French, German)
  • José (French, Spanish, Portuguese)

Charles

Charles comes from the Germanic name Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”, not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Charles is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: English, French

Nicknames: Charlie/Charley/Charlee

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Variants:

  • Charlot (French)
  • Carolus (Latin)
  • Karolos (Greek)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Carles (Catalan)
  • Karlo (Croatian)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Karel (Dutch, Czech, Slovene)
  • Karol (Polish, Slovak, Slovene)
  • Kaarle (Finnish)
  • Kaarlo (Finnish)
  • Kale (Hawaiian)
  • Károly (Hungarian)
  • Séarlas (Irish)
  • Sjarel (Limburgish)
  • Karolis (Lithuanian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carol (Romanian)
  • Siarl (Welsh)
  • Xarles (Basque)

Female forms:

  • Charlotte (French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Charlotta (Swedish)
  • Charlene (English)
  • Charline (English)
  • Charlena (English)
  • Carlotta (Italian)
  • Carlota (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carla (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Carline (English, French, Dutch, German)
  • Caroline (English, French, German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English Swedish)

Charlotte

Charlotte is the French feminine form of Charlot, which is the French male diminutive of Charles which comes from Germanic Karl meaning “man” via Proto-Germanic *karilaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Nicknames: Charlie/Charlee, Lottie

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Variants:

  • Charlotta (Swedish)
  • Charlene (English)
  • Charline (English)
  • Charlena (English)
  • Carlotta (Italian)
  • Carlota (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carla (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Carline (English, French, Dutch, German)
  • Caroline (English, French, German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English Swedish)

Male forms:

  • Charlot (French)
  • Carolus (Latin)
  • Karolos (Greek)
  • Charles (English, French)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Carles (Catalan)
  • Karlo (Croatian)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Karel (Dutch, Czech, Slovene)
  • Karol (Polish, Slovak, Slovene)
  • Kaarle (Finnish)
  • Kaarlo (Finnish)
  • Kale (Hawaiian)
  • Károly (Hungarian)
  • Séarlas (Irish)
  • Sjarel (Limburgish)
  • Karolis (Lithuanian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carol (Romanian)
  • Siarl (Welsh)

Melissa

Melissa is the name of a nymph in Greek mythology who helped nurse the infant Zeus along with Amalthea, when he was hidden from his father Cronus. She fed him honey and was also credited with the art of bee-keeping.

Melissa is also the name of a 3rd century BC Pythagorean philosopher and mathematician although very little is known of her life- actually, nothing at all.

Melissa is also the name of a good sorceress in the Italian epic poem Orlando Furioso and features in the Matter of France (a body of medieval literature and legendary material associated with France, especially involving Charlemagne). 

Melissa is the name of a genus of plants which also includes the lemon balm.

The name means “bee” or “honeybee” via Ancient Greek mélissa μέλισσᾰ (bee; honey) which derives from PIE *mélit (honey) and *leyǵʰ- (to lick).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “bee, honeybee”

Usage: Ancient Greek, English, French

Nicknames:Mel, Lissa, Lissy, Melly/Melli, Missy

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Variants:

  • Melyssa (English)
  • Melisa (English, Spanish, Bosnian, Turkish)
  • Melitta (Ancient Attic Greek)
  • Melita (Latinized Ancient Greek)
  • Melite (Ancient Greek)
  • Melisa (Turkish)
  • Melis (Turkish)
  • Melika (Hawaiian)
  • Mélissa (French)
  • Melissza (Hungarian)

Male forms:

  • Melissos (Ancient Greek)
  • Melissus (Ancient Greek)
  • Melisseus (Ancient Greek)

Victor

Victor comes from a Late Latin name via Latin victor meaning “conqueror; victor” as a noun and “victorious, triumphant, conquering” as an adjective, from Latin vincere (to win) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word.

The English word victor refers to the winner of a fight which derives from the Latin word. 

Victor is also a French and English surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “conqueror; victor”

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman

Nicknames: Vic

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Variants:

  • Viktor (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Vitya (Russian diminutive of Viktor)
  • Vicktor (English, Swedish)
  • Victorius (Late Roman)
  • Bittor (Basque)
  • Viktar (Belarusian)
  • Víctor (Catalan, Spanish)
  • Vítor (Galician, Portuguese)
  • Vihtori (Finnish)
  • Vittorio (Italian form of Victorius)
  • Vittore (Italian)
  • Viktors (Latvian)
  • Viktoras (Lithuanian)
  • Wiktor (Polish)
  • Gwythyr (Welsh)

Female forms:

  • Victoria (English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman)
  • Viktoria (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian)
  • Viktoriya (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Viktoriia (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Viktoryia (Belarusian)
  • Victòria (Catalan)
  • Vitória (Portuguese)
  • Viktorija (Lithuanian, Latvian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Wiktorija (Polish)
  • Victoire (French)
  • Viktorie (Czech)
  • Wikolia (Hawaiian)
  • Viktória (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Vittoria (Italian)
  • Latoya (African-American)

Daniel

Daniel is the name of several figures in the Bible, including the prophet Daniel, who features in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. It comes from a Hebrew name meaning “God is my judge” or “judge of God”, made up of Hebrew dan דָּן (to judge) and el אֵל (god).

Daniel is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Semitic

Meaning: “God is my judge” or “judge of God”

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian

Nicknames: Dan, Danny/Dannie

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Variants:

  • Danilo (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian)
  • Daniele (Italian)
  • Danijel (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Danyal (Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Turkish)
  • Taniel (Armenian)
  • Danel (Basque)
  • Deniel (Breton)
  • Danail (Bulgarian)
  • Daniël (Dutch)
  • Dániel (Hungarian, Faroese)
  • Dánjal (Faroese)
  • Taneli (Finnish)
  • Daníel (Icelandic)
  • Daniels (Latvian)
  • Danielius (Lithuanian)
  • Daniil (Russian)
  • Deiniol (Welsh)

Feminine forms:

  • Danielle (French, English)
  • Danièle (French)
  • Daniela (Bulgarian, Italian, German, Czech, Slovak, Romanian, Portuguese, Spanish, Macedonian, English)
  • Daniella (English)
  • Dana (Romanian, Czech, Slovak, German, Hebrew)
  • Danijela (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Daniëlle (Dutch)

Sonia

Sonia is a variant spelling of Sonya, a Russian diminutive of Sofiya, the Russian, Ukrainian, and Bulgarian form of Sophia which comes from Ancient Greek sophía σοφῐ́ᾱ meaning “wisdom”, originally connoting the meaning of skill or cleverness, especially in regards to a craft or someone who was wise and learned; it derives from Ancient Greek sophos which originates from an unknown origin.

Sonia is also a popular Indian female name though in this case it seems to be derived from Sanskrit sonā सोना meaning “gold” via suvárna (meaning “gold” as a noun, and “gold, golden color; bright, brilliant hue; good color” as an adjective), which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Origin: unknown; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: ultimately from Sophia meaning “wisdom”; is also an Indian female name meaning “gold”

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, French, Greek, Russian, Indian, Hindi

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Variants:

  • Sonya (Russian, English)
  • Sonja (German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Sonje (German)
  • Sofya (Russian)
  • Sophia (Ancient Greek, Greek, English, German)
  • Sofia (Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Italian, Greek, Finnish Estonian, Slovak, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian)
  • Sophie (French, English, German, Dutch)
  • Sophy (English)
  • Sofija (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, Latvian)
  • Sofie (German, Danish, Dutch, Czech)
  • Žofie (Czech)
  • Soňa (Czech, Slovak)
  • Sohvi (Finnish)
  • Sopio (Georgian)
  • Szofi (Hungarian)
  • Zsófia (Hungarian)
  • Szófia (Hungarian)
  • Szonja (Hungarian)
  • Soffía (Icelandic)
  • Zofia (Polish)
  • Žofia (Slovak)

Male forms:

  • Soni (Indian, Hindi)

Claire

Claire is the French form of Clara, the feminine form of Late Latin Clarus via Latin clārus meaning “clear, bright, shining; renowned, famous” derived from PIE *kelh₁- (to call, shout).

Claire is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “clear, bright; famous”

Usage: French, English

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Variants:

  • Clara (Italian, English, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman)
  • Klara (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian)
  • Klára (Hungarian, Czech, Slovak)
  • Klāra (Latvian)
  • Chiara (Italian)
  • Chiarina (Italian diminutive of Chiara)
  • Claretta (Italian diminutive of Clara)
  • Clare (English)
  • Clarice (English)
  • Clarissa (English, Italian)

Male forms:

  • Clair (French)
  • Clarus (Late Roman)