Annette

Annette originated as a French diminutive of Anne < Anna meaning “favor, grace” via Hebrew root word hanan חנן (to be gracious, merciful, compassionate) which seems to be derived from a Proto-Semitic origin.

Origin: Proto-Semitic

Meaning: “favor, grace”

Usage: French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch

Variants:

Carl

Carl originated as the German form of Charles, the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Variants:

  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, English)
  • Carolus (Latinized Ancient Germanic)

Female forms:

  • Carla (German, Italian, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Croatian)

Meta

Meta is a Scandinavian, German, and Slovene short form of Margareta from English Margaret meaning “pearl” which comes from Ancient Greek margarítēs μαργᾰρῑ́της (pearl) which derives from an unknown origin, though it could be derived from an Indo-Iranian origin.

Meta (μετά) is also the name of a minor figure in Greek mythology, the first wife of Aegeus (the king of Athens and father of Theseus with a different woman). The name means “beyond” and derives from the same Greek prefix meaning “after” or “beyond” which derives from a PIE root word.

Meta is also a surname- first an Albanian surname whose meaning I couldn’t find, and it’s also a Japanese surname written with the kanji 米 (rice) + 田 “rice paddy, rice field” and written in hiragana as めた.

Origin: uncertain though possibly from an Indo-Iranian source; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: a shorted form of Margareta “pearl”; also a Greek prefix “after” or “beyond”

Usage: German, Danish, Swedish, Slovene, Ancient Greek

Björn

Björn is a Swedish and Icelandic male name meaning “bear” via Old Norse bjǫrn (bear) via Proto-Germanic *berô (bear) via a PIE root word.

Björn is also a Swedish surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “bear”

Usage: Swedish, Icelandic, German, Dutch)

Pronunciation: b-yorn; Forvo

Variants:

  • Bjoern (German)
  • Bjørn (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Bjǫrn (Old Norse, Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Bjarni (Icelandic, Faroese, Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Bjarne (Danish, Norwegian, Swedish)

Dagmar

Dagmar is a Scandinavian and German female name meaning “day maid” made up of Old Norse elements dagr (day) < Proto-Germanic *dagaz which derives from an uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to PIE root *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn); and mær (maid, girl; and, in a more poetic sense, daughter).

I’ve also seen Dagmar listed as being an Old Danish form of Slavic Dragomira, the feminine form of Dragomir meaning “dear, precious + peace; world”

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Proto-Slavic

Meaning: “day maid”; could also have originated from Slavic Dragomira “dear, precious + peace; world”

Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak

Variants:

  • Dagmær (Ancient Scandinavian, Old Norse)
  • Dagmara (Polish)
  • Dagna (Polish)
  • Dagnė (Lithuanian)

Sven

Sven is a Scandinavian male name via Old Norse Sveinn, originally a byname meaning “boy, servant” via Proto-Germanic *swainaz (relative; kinsman; young man) which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Sven is also a Swedish word meaning “squire” or “page”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “boy”

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Estonian

Variants:

  • Svein (Norwegian)
  • Svend (Danish)
  • Sveinn (Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic)
  • Soini (Finnish)

Female forms:

  • Svenja (German)

Rosalie

Rosalie is the French, German, and Dutch form of Latin Rosalia via rosa (rose) which comes via Ancient Greek rhodon (rose), a word which comes from an uncertain borrowing. It’s ultimately believed to be derived from Old Persian *vr̥da-(flower) though it may be derived from a Thracian source since the rose was native to Thrace.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: “rose”

Usage: French, German, Dutch, English

Variants:

  • Rosalee (English)
  • Rosaleigh (English)
  • Rosalia (Late Roman, Italian)
  • Rozalia (Polish, Romanian)
  • Rozálie (Czech)
  • Rozalie (Dutch)

Karolina

Karolina is the Scandinavian and Slavic form of Caroline, the French form of Carolus which is the Latin form of Charles,the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”, those who were not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, German

Variants:

  • Karolína (Czech, Slovak)
  • Karolīna (Latvian)
  • Carolina (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Swedish, English)

Charlotte

Charlotte is the French feminine form of Charlot, which is the French male diminutive of Charles which comes from Germanic Karl meaning “man” via Proto-Germanic *karilaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Nicknames: Charlie/Charlee, Lottie

69947073a4ded01d32631d63d01f6360
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Charlotta (Swedish)
  • Charlene (English)
  • Charline (English)
  • Charlena (English)
  • Carlotta (Italian)
  • Carlota (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carla (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Carline (English, French, Dutch, German)
  • Caroline (English, French, German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English Swedish)

Male forms:

  • Charlot (French)
  • Carolus (Latin)
  • Karolos (Greek)
  • Charles (English, French)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Carles (Catalan)
  • Karlo (Croatian)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Karel (Dutch, Czech, Slovene)
  • Karol (Polish, Slovak, Slovene)
  • Kaarle (Finnish)
  • Kaarlo (Finnish)
  • Kale (Hawaiian)
  • Károly (Hungarian)
  • Séarlas (Irish)
  • Sjarel (Limburgish)
  • Karolis (Lithuanian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carol (Romanian)
  • Siarl (Welsh)

Carla

Carla is the feminine form of Carlo (Italian), Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese), and Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English), all of which come from Charles, an English and French name derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch

cade5ab16c69d2929c21aca302fc4e88
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, English)
  • Carly (English)
  • Carley (English)
  • Carlie (English)
  • Carli (English)
  • Karly (English)
  • Karlee (English)
  • Carlene (English)
  • Carline (English)
  • Karlene (English)
  • Carlita (Spanish & Portuguese diminutive of Carla)

Male forms:

  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)

Walburga

Walburga is a German female name, most famously associated with an 8th century English saint who did missionary work in Germany. Walpurgis night is a celebration that takes place on April 30th, celebrated in Northern Europe and Scandinavia, often associated with witches and bonfires. The festival long preceded the arrival of Christianity and Saint Walburga but became associated with Saint Walburga in an effort to distance it from its pagan roots.

The name is composed of Proto-Germanic elements *waldaną (to rule) and burg (stronghold, fortress; castle, city) essentially meaning “ruler of the fortress”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “ruler of the fortress”

Usage: German

ab497c59d64331fd1135d0d4446e8a68
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Waldeburg (Ancient Germanic)
  • Walpurga (German, Latin)
  • Wealdburg (Old English)
  • Valpurga (Latin)
  • Walpurgis (German, Latin)
  • Walburgis (German)
  • Valborg (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Faroese)
  • Valpuri (Finnish)
  • Vappu (Finnish diminutive of Valpuri)

Viola

Viola comes from the Latin word viola meaning “violet (flower)”, related to Ancient Greek íon (violet) which seems to be derived from a pre-Indo-European Mediterranean source. In Italian, viola is the Italian word for violet.

Viola is also the name of a musical instrument though in this case the word comes from Italian viola< Old Occitan viola< Medieval Latin vitula (stringed instrument) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word.

Viola is the name of the heroine in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night (1601-02), the twin sister of Sebastian, who dresses up as a man and becomes entangled in a somewhat humorous love triangle that all works out in the end.

Viola is also the name of a genus of flowering plants that includes violets and pansies.

Viola is also an Italian and Catalan surname; in the case of the former it derives from the female given name; the latter is likely an occupational name for a viol player.

Origin: uncertain, perhaps from a Mediterranean source; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “violet (flower”); also the name of a musical instrument as well as the color violet

Usage: Latin, Italian, English, Swedish, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak

Pronunciation: vye-o-lah or vee-o-lah.

b3a8828d5938a2be83ffa6bcf80f7e3b
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Violet (English)
  • Violette (French)
  • Violetta (Italian, Russian)
  • Violeta (Bulgarian, Romanian, Spanish, Macedonian, Serbian, Lithuanian)
  • Wioletta (Polish)
  • Wioleta (Polish)
  • Wiola (Polish)
  • Viorela (Romanian)
  • Viorica (Romanian)

Male forms

  • Viorel (Romanian)