Kanna

Kanna is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

kan

  • “bookmark”
  • “ring, circle, wheel”
  • “tolerant, lenient, generous”
  • “god, deity”
  • “citrus fruit”
  • “joy, delight, pleasure”
  • “daring, brave, bold”

na

  • “greens, vegetables”
  • “what”
  • “Nara; what”
  • “calm, lull” (na(gi)
  • “south”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s かんな while it can also be written in katakana as カンナ.

Kanna (寛和) is also the name of a Japanese era that lasted for two years (985-987). The kanji that make up the name can also be read as Hirokazu meaning “gentleness, harmony”, as well as the name of a type of Japanese plane, a wood-working tool.

Kanna (also spelled channa and canna) is also the name of a succulent plant in South Africa (also known as Sceletium tortuosum) that has been used for centuries as a mood enhancer, able to relieve stress and anxiety as well as induce feelings of euphoria; and can be either smoked, chewed, or brewed as a tea. The kanna plant is also known as Kougoed in Afrikaans meaning “something to chew” or “a thing to chew on”.

Kanna is also another name for Platysace cirrosa (also known as karna), a perennial herb found in Western Australia. Kanna is the Noongar name for the plant, the Noongar being Aboriginal Australians.

Kanna (also known as ganna) is also another name for Caroxylon aphyllum, a species of shrub found in the Karoo region of South Africa.

Kanna is also the name of a town in ancient Lycaonia (what is now modern-day Turkey) as well as the name of a village in southern Poland.

Kanna is also the Haitian Creole word for “duck”.

Origin: Japanese

Meaning: a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used; also the name of a Japanese era and a Japanese plane (wood-working tool); the name of a succulent plant in S. Africa and a shrub, a perennial herb in W. Australia, as well as the name name of a town in Ancient Lycaonia and a village in Poland; also a Haitian Creole word “duck”

Usage: Japanese

Kendra

Kendra seems to be a feminine form of Kenneth, itself an anglicized form of two Scottish Gaelic names:

  • the first is Coinneach meaning “handsome, fair, beautiful” via Gaelic caoin (handsome);
  • the second is Cináed, a name of uncertain etymology though the second element seems to be derived from Old Irish áed “fire” < Proto-Celtic *aidus which ultimately derives from a PIE root word. The first element may be derived from Irish cion (love, affection; regard, esteem), so the name would essentially mean “beloved of Aodh”, Aodh being the god of the underworld;
  • Cináed may also possibly be related to Ciniod, a Pictish name with a very different origin. Though the first element is uncertain, the second element seems to be related to Proto-Brythonic *jʉð (lord, judge).

Kendra could also be a feminine form of Kendrick which in this case comes from an English, Welsh, and Scottish surname with a few possible meanings such as (respectively) “royal power”, “chief hero” or “great champion”, or “son of Henry“.

It’s also likely that Kendra could have been inspired as a smoosh of Ken/Kenneth and Sandra, a shortened form of Alexandra or Alessandra meaning “defending men” or “defender of men”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain

Meaning: “handsome, fair, beautiful”; possibly “beloved of Aodh”; may also be related to a Pictish name, the second element possibly meaning “lord”; “royal power”, “chief hero” or “great champion”, or “son of Henry”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Kenna (Scottish)
  • Kenina (Scottish)

Male forms:

  • Kenneth (Scottish, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)
  • Kennith (English)
  • Kennet (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)
  • Coinneach (Scottish)
  • Cináed (Scottish, Irish)

Kinvara

Kinvara is the name of a village located in the southwest County Galway, Ireland as well as the name of a town in west County Galway. The name comes from Irish Cinn Mhara meaning “head of the sea”, composed of Irish ceann (head) and mara, an inflection of muir (sea), both of which ultimately derive from a PIE origin.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “head of the sea”

Usage: English (British)

Karolina

Karolina is the Scandinavian and Slavic form of Caroline, the French form of Carolus which is the Latin form of Charles,the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”, those who were not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, German

Variants:

  • Karolína (Czech, Slovak)
  • Karolīna (Latvian)
  • Carolina (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Swedish, English)

Kokoro

Kokoro is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

  • kokoro “heart, mind, soul”
  • kokoro “love, affection”
  • kokoro 愛心 “love, affection” +heart, mind, soul”
  • kokoro “idea; mind; heart; desire”
  • kokoro “tenderness, gentleness; kind, good”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s こころ.

Origin: Japanese

Meaning: several depending on the kanji used

Usage: Japanese

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Kayla

Kayla is a female given name which likely originated as a shortened form of Michaela, the feminine form of Michael meaning “who is like god?”, a rhetorical question implying there is no one like God.

Kayla may also have originated as a combination of Kay (a name with several possible meanings and origins, though often used as a nickname for Katherine) combined with the suffix -la.

It’s also possible that Kayla might have originated as a variant transcription of Kaila, the Yiddish form of Hebrew Kelila meaning “crown of laurel”. Kayla is also the name of a dialect spoken by members of the Agaw people of Ethiopia, possibly meaning “artisan” or “one who has not crossed”, in reference to the fact that Jews had to avoid certain activities during the Shabbat.

Kayla may also have been inspired by Caelan or names such as Keelin or Keeley derived from Scottish Gaelic caol meaning “slender, thin”.

Origin: Proto-Semitic; Proto-Celtic

Meaning: a shortened form of Michaela “who is like god?”; possibly an elaborated form of Kay, often used as a nickname for Katherine; possibly a variant of Kaila, Kelila “crown of laurel”; possibly “artisan” or “one who has not crossed”; or possibly inspired by Gaelic “slender, thin”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Kaila (English, Yiddish)
  • Cayla (English)
  • Caila (English)