Desideria

Desideria is the feminine form of Desiderio, the Italian and Spanish form of Late Latin Desiderius meaning “longing, desire” via desidero (to desire, want, wish for) which seems to have originated from the phrase de sidere (‘from the stars’ or ‘of the stars’), made up of Latin prefix de- (of, from) and sidus(star, constellation).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “desire, longing”

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman

Variants:

  • Désirée (French)
  • Desiree (French, English)
  • Desirae (English)
  • Deziree (English)
  • Desirée (German, Swedish)
  • Desiderata (Late Roman)
  • Desidéria (Portuguese)
  • Desire (English)

Male forms:

  • Désiré (French)
  • Desire (French, English)
  • Desideratus (Late Roman)
  • Desiderio (Spanish, Italian)
  • Desidério (Portuguese)
  • Didier (French)
  • Dezső (Hungarian)

Victor

Victor comes from a Late Latin name via Latin victor meaning “conqueror; victor” as a noun and “victorious, triumphant, conquering” as an adjective, from Latin vincere (to win) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word.

The English word victor refers to the winner of a fight which derives from the Latin word. 

Victor is also a French and English surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “conqueror; victor”

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman

Nicknames: Vic

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Variants:

  • Viktor (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Vitya (Russian diminutive of Viktor)
  • Vicktor (English, Swedish)
  • Victorius (Late Roman)
  • Bittor (Basque)
  • Viktar (Belarusian)
  • Víctor (Catalan, Spanish)
  • Vítor (Galician, Portuguese)
  • Vihtori (Finnish)
  • Vittorio (Italian form of Victorius)
  • Vittore (Italian)
  • Viktors (Latvian)
  • Viktoras (Lithuanian)
  • Wiktor (Polish)
  • Gwythyr (Welsh)

Female forms:

  • Victoria (English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman)
  • Viktoria (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian)
  • Viktoriya (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Viktoriia (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Viktoryia (Belarusian)
  • Victòria (Catalan)
  • Vitória (Portuguese)
  • Viktorija (Lithuanian, Latvian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Wiktorija (Polish)
  • Victoire (French)
  • Viktorie (Czech)
  • Wikolia (Hawaiian)
  • Viktória (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Vittoria (Italian)
  • Latoya (African-American)

Leo

Leo comes from the Latin word meaning “lion” via Ancient Greek leon which derives from an uncertain origin; it’s possible it could have been adopted from a non Indo-European source, perhaps from Proto-Semitic *labiʾ-, *labuʾ- (lion). The name might have originated as a nickname for someone who was courageous and brave.

Leo is the name of a constellation representing to the Ancient Greeks the Nemean lion killed by the Greek hero Herakles as part of his twelve labors. Leo is also a Zodiac sign belonging to those born between July 22nd to August 23rd; apparently those born under this sign are stubborn, loyal and trustworthy, assured, confident and ambitious, but prone to arrogance, jealousy, and bossiness.

Leo could also be used as a nickname for names such as Leonidas (an Ancient Greek name meaning “son of the lion” or “son of a lion”), Leopold (a Germanic name meaning “bold people”), and Leonard (meaning “brave lion”), or any name beginning with Leo.

Origin: uncertain, possibly from a Proto-Semitic source

Meaning: “lion”

Usage: Late Roman, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Croatian

Variants:

  • Leon (Greek, Ancient Greek, English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch)
  • Leontios (Ancient Greek)
  • Leontius (Ancient Greek, Latin)
  • Levon (Armenian)
  • Leoš (Czech)
  • Léo (French)
  • Léon (French)
  • Léonce (French form of Leontios)
  • Lionel (French diminutive of Léon; English)
  • Levan (Georgian)
  • Leone (Italian)
  • Leonzio (Italian form of Leontios)
  • Leonas (Lithuanian)
  • Lef (Polish cognate of Lev)
  • Lev (Russian)
  • Leonti (Russian)
  • Leontiy (Russian)
  • Leonty (Russian)
  • Lyov (Russian)
  • León (Spanish)
  • Leoncio (Spanish)
  • Leonius (Late Roman)

Female forms:

  • Leona (English, German, Czech)
  • Leola (English)
  • Leone (French, English)
  • Leontina (Italian, Late Roman)
  • Leonia (Late Roman)
  • Leonie (French, German, Dutch, English)
  • Léonie (French)
  • Léontine (French)
  • Léone (French)
  • Leontýna (Czech)
  • Leontyne (English)

Serena

Serena is a Late Roman given name, the feminine form of Serenus which derives from Latin serenus meaning “clear, tranquil, serene”, originally used  to refer to clear, calm weather, and, figuratively, “cheerful, glad, joyous”. Though the origin of the word is uncertain it has been linked to PIE root word *ksero- (dry).

Serena is also an Italian and Catalan surname originating from the given name.

Serena could also be used as a Japanese female name (also spelled Serina) with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

  • seri  “parsley” + rei  “wise” + na  “greens; vegetables” (芹怜菜);
  • sei  “eventide; tide; salt water” + rei  “wise” + na  “greens; vegetables” (汐玲菜);
  • se  “world, society; generation” + rei  “manners, etiquette; bow, salute” + na  “Nara, what?” (世礼奈);
  • se  “rapids, current” + rei  “order, command, decree” + na  “Nara, what?” (瀬令奈);
  • se  “rapids, current” + ren  “attach; love; romance” + na  “Nara, what?” (瀬恋奈)

Written in hiragana it’s せれな. Serena is also written as セレナ in katakana.

Origin: uncertain, possibly Proto-Indo-European; Japanese

Meaning: from a Late Roman name “clear, tranquil, calm”; as a Japanese name, it has a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used in Japanese

Usage: English, Late Roman, French, Spanish, Italian, Catalan

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Variants:

  • Serina (English, Japanese)
  • Sarina (English, Dutch)
  • Serrena (English)
  • Serene (English)
  • Séréna (French)

Male forms:

  • Serenus (Late Roman)
  • Sereno (Italian)
  • Serene (English)

Veronica

Veronica is the Latin transliteration of Berenice, itself the Latinized form of Berenike, the Ancient Macedonian form of Ancient Greek Pherenike meaning “bringing victory”, “bearer of victory”, or “bringer of victory”, made up of Ancient Greek elements phero (to bring, carry, bear) and nike (victory). While phero derives from a PIE root word, nike is a word of uncertain etymology, perhaps derived from a pre-Greek word.

However, Veronica later became associated with the Latin phrase vera icon meaning “true image”, in reference to Saint Veronica, a woman who wiped the face of Jesus Christ on her veil; his face apparently became imprinted on the veil which later became known as The Veil of Veronica.

Veronica is also the name of a genus of flowers which seems to have been named after Saint Veronica.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain etymology

Meaning: “bringing victory”, “bearer of victory” or “bringer of victory”

Usage: Late Roman, Italian, Romanian, Spanish, English

Nicknames: Ronnie/Ronny, Vero, Vera, Nica/Nika

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Variants:

  • Veronika (Russian, Czech, Slovak, German, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Lithuanian, Latvian)
  • Véronique (French)
  • Weronika (Polish, Sorbian)
  • Verônika (Portuguese)
  • Verónica (Spanish)
  • Bérénice (French)
  • Berenice (English, Italian, Ancient Greek)
  • Berenike (Ancient Macedonian)
  • Pherenike (Ancient Greek)
  • Bernice (English)
  • Berniece (English)
  • Bernike (Greek)