Melissa

Melissa is the name of a nymph in Greek mythology who helped nurse the infant Zeus along with Amalthea, when he was hidden from his father Cronus. She fed him honey and was also credited with the art of bee-keeping.

Melissa is also the name of a 3rd century BC Pythagorean philosopher and mathematician although very little is known of her life- actually, nothing at all.

Melissa is also the name of a good sorceress in the Italian epic poem Orlando Furioso and features in the Matter of France (a body of medieval literature and legendary material associated with France, especially involving Charlemagne). 

Melissa is the name of a genus of plants which also includes the lemon balm.

The name means “bee” or “honeybee” via Ancient Greek mélissa μέλισσᾰ (bee; honey) which derives from PIE *mélit (honey) and *leyǵʰ- (to lick).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “bee, honeybee”

Usage: Ancient Greek, English, French

Nicknames:Mel, Lissa, Lissy, Melly/Melli, Missy

37e3a1aaf24ae846ac71b2b064411f02
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Melyssa (English)
  • Melisa (English, Spanish, Bosnian, Turkish)
  • Melitta (Ancient Attic Greek)
  • Melita (Latinized Ancient Greek)
  • Melite (Ancient Greek)
  • Melisa (Turkish)
  • Melis (Turkish)
  • Melika (Hawaiian)
  • Mélissa (French)
  • Melissza (Hungarian)

Male forms:

  • Melissos (Ancient Greek)
  • Melissus (Ancient Greek)
  • Melisseus (Ancient Greek)

Roland

Roland is the the name of a Frankish paladin who served under Charlemagne the Great, King of the Franks and Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, in the 8th century; according to legend, he is also depicted as Charlemagne‘s nephew. Roland was a popular figure in medieval Europe and there was even an epic poem (or chanson de gets in Old French) written about him, The Song of Roland (La Chanson de Roland) which depicts Roland’s final battle and death.

Roland is composed of Germanic elements hrod (fame) and land (land) essentially meaning “famous land”. I’ve also seen a few sites claim the second element deriving from nand meaning “brave”, but land seems more likely, essentially referring to someone who was famous throughout the land.

Roland is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “famous land” or it could be stretched out to mean “famous throughout the land”

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Polish, Medieval French

dc4034fca147601e212763733edfd20c
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Rolland (English)
  • Rowland (English)
  • Rolin (French, English)
  • Roeland (Dutch)
  • Loránd (Hungarian)
  • Lóránt (Hungarian)
  • Hrodland (Ancient Germanic)
  • Orlando (Italian)
  • Rolando (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian)
  • Roldán (Spanish)
  • Roldão (Portuguese)
  • Rolan (Russian)

Feminine forms:

  • Rolande (French)
  • Rolanda (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Orlanda (Italian)