Placido

Placido is the Italian and Spanish form of Late Latin Placidus meaning “quiet, calm, placid, gentle” (technically Plácido is the Spanish form of Placidus).

Placido is also an Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “quiet, calm, placid, gentle”

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese

Variants:

  • Placidus (Late Roman)
  • Plácido (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Placide (French)
  • Placid (English)

Female forms:

  • Placida (Late Roman, Italian)
  • Plácida (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Placide (French)
  • Placid (English)

Adrielle

Adrielle is the feminine form of Adriel, a Hebrew male name meaning “flock of God” or “my help is God”; in the Old Testament, Adriel marries one of Saul’s daughters, Merab.

Origin: Hebrew

Meaning: “flock of God” or “my help is God”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Adriella (Brazilian Portuguese, English)

Male forms:

  • Adriel (Hebrew, English, Spanish)

Eliana

Eliana is a Hebrew female name meaning “my God has answered”.

Eliana is also the Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese form of French Éliane via Ancient Roman Aeliana, the feminine form of Aelius, a Roman family name of unknown meaning though it’s often been linked to Ancient Greek helios meaning “sun”.

It’s also possible that Eliana could be a variant spelling of Ileana, the Romanian form of Helena, the Latin form of Ancient Greek Helene. The origin of the name is unknown- it’s been linked to Ancient Greek helene meaning “torch”, likely in reference to something that shines or illuminates, so the name would essentially mean “the shining one” or “the bright one”; another possible origin is from Ancient Greek selene “moon”, which would tie it to the idea of illumination and light.

Origin: Hebrew; uncertain

Meaning: from Hebrew “my God has answered”; also the Latinate form of Ancient Roman Aeliana/Aelius, possibly “sun”; could also be from Ancient Greek helene “torch” or selene “moon”, essentially meaning “the shining one” or “the bright one”

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Hebrew

Nicknames: Liana, Ellie/Elly, Lina, Nina

Variants:

  • Elliana (English)
  • Eleana (English)
  • Eleanna (English)
  • Elleana (English
  • Aeliana (Ancient Roman)
  • Éliane (French)
  • Élian (Spanish, Portuguese)

Male forms:

  • Elian (English, Spanish)
  • Elián (Spanish, Portuguese)

Carlos

Carlos is the Spanish and Portuguese form of Charles, which comes from Germanic Karl meaning “man” via Proto-Germanic *karilaz (free man, itself of uncertain etymology. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land.

Carlos is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

aa241cfb0474170f5cbbbca1c3bbc401
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Charles (English, French)
  • Charlot (French)
  • Carolus (Latin)
  • Karolos (Greek)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Carles (Catalan)
  • Karlo (Croatian)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Karel (Dutch, Czech, Slovene)
  • Karol (Polish, Slovak, Slovene)
  • Kaarle (Finnish)
  • Kaarlo (Finnish)
  • Kale (Hawaiian)
  • Károly (Hungarian)
  • Séarlas (Irish)
  • Sjarel (Limburgish)
  • Karolis (Lithuanian)
  • Carol (Romanian)
  • Siarl (Welsh)
  • Xarles (Basque)

Female forms:

  • Carla (Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Italian, German, Dutch, English)
  • Karla (German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Charlotte (French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Charlotta (Swedish)
  • Charlene (English)
  • Charline (English)
  • Charlena (English)
  • Carlotta (Italian)
  • Carlota (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carline (English, French, Dutch, German)
  • Caroline (English, French, German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English Swedish)
  • Carly (English)

Carla

Carla is the feminine form of Carlo (Italian), Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese), and Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English), all of which come from Charles, an English and French name derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch

cade5ab16c69d2929c21aca302fc4e88
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, English)
  • Carly (English)
  • Carley (English)
  • Carlie (English)
  • Carli (English)
  • Karly (English)
  • Karlee (English)
  • Carlene (English)
  • Carline (English)
  • Karlene (English)
  • Carlita (Spanish & Portuguese diminutive of Carla)

Male forms:

  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)

Yuri

Yuri is a Russian, Ukrainian, and Belarusian male name, the Slavic form of George meaning “farmer, earthworker” made up of Ancient Greek elements ge (earth) which seems to derive from an unknown origin, likely pre-Greek in origin; and ergon (work), which ultimately desires from a PIE root word. Interestingly enough, I’ve found that Yuri is a somewhat popular male name in Brazil which I’m assuming comes from the Slavic name.

Yuri is also a Japanese female name. It means “lily” written with the kanji 百合 but has other meanings depending on the kanji used:

yu 

  • “cause, reason”
  • 友 “friend”
  • 有 “exist; have; possess”
  • “divine help”

ri

  • 梨 “pear”
  • “village”
  • “reason, logic”
  • “profit, benefit”
  • 莉 “jasmine”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s ゆり and in katakana it’s ユリ.

Yuri is also a Korean female name (also spelled Yu-ri and Yoo-ri) written in hangul as 유리 and has different meanings depending on the hanja used such as: 

유 (yu)

  • () “to approve”
  • () “childish; immature; young” 
  • (宥) “forgive”
  • (釉) “glaze”

리 (ri)

  • (利) “benefit, advantage”
  • () “pear” 

Yuri also means “glass” written with the hanja 琉璃. There are likely other meanings depending on the hanja used

 Origin: unknown; Proto-Indo-European; Japanese; Korean

Meaning: Russian and Ukrainian male name “farmer, earth-worker”; also a Japanese and Korean female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji and hanja used

Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Portuguese, Japanese, Korean 

03601f66b3d1f3cff67c7ea3cec29cfd
Pinterest

Female variants:

  • Yu-ri (Korean)
  • Yoo-ri (Korean)
  • You-ri (Korean)
  • Yuriko (Japanese)- with the ko suffix meaning “child”
  • Yurina (Japanese) with the na kanji
  • Yurika (Japanese)- with the ka kanji

Male forms:

  • Yuriy (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Yury (Russian, Belarusian)
  • Iouri (Russian)

Victor

Victor comes from a Late Latin name via Latin victor meaning “conqueror; victor” as a noun and “victorious, triumphant, conquering” as an adjective, from Latin vincere (to win) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word.

The English word victor refers to the winner of a fight which derives from the Latin word. 

Victor is also a French and English surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “conqueror; victor”

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman

Nicknames: Vic

e38ea3323706af7ae3318985bc0b2c15
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Viktor (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Vitya (Russian diminutive of Viktor)
  • Vicktor (English, Swedish)
  • Victorius (Late Roman)
  • Bittor (Basque)
  • Viktar (Belarusian)
  • Víctor (Catalan, Spanish)
  • Vítor (Galician, Portuguese)
  • Vihtori (Finnish)
  • Vittorio (Italian form of Victorius)
  • Vittore (Italian)
  • Viktors (Latvian)
  • Viktoras (Lithuanian)
  • Wiktor (Polish)
  • Gwythyr (Welsh)

Female forms:

  • Victoria (English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman)
  • Viktoria (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian)
  • Viktoriya (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Viktoriia (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Viktoryia (Belarusian)
  • Victòria (Catalan)
  • Vitória (Portuguese)
  • Viktorija (Lithuanian, Latvian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Wiktorija (Polish)
  • Victoire (French)
  • Viktorie (Czech)
  • Wikolia (Hawaiian)
  • Viktória (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Vittoria (Italian)
  • Latoya (African-American)

Daniel

Daniel is the name of several figures in the Bible, including the prophet Daniel, who features in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. It comes from a Hebrew name meaning “God is my judge” or “judge of God”, made up of Hebrew dan דָּן (to judge) and el אֵל (god).

Daniel is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Semitic

Meaning: “God is my judge” or “judge of God”

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian

Nicknames: Dan, Danny/Dannie

ef2876586e5dcf3c353b926bd95efe6a
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Danilo (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian)
  • Daniele (Italian)
  • Danijel (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Danyal (Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Turkish)
  • Taniel (Armenian)
  • Danel (Basque)
  • Deniel (Breton)
  • Danail (Bulgarian)
  • Daniël (Dutch)
  • Dániel (Hungarian, Faroese)
  • Dánjal (Faroese)
  • Taneli (Finnish)
  • Daníel (Icelandic)
  • Daniels (Latvian)
  • Danielius (Lithuanian)
  • Daniil (Russian)
  • Deiniol (Welsh)

Feminine forms:

  • Danielle (French, English)
  • Danièle (French)
  • Daniela (Bulgarian, Italian, German, Czech, Slovak, Romanian, Portuguese, Spanish, Macedonian, English)
  • Daniella (English)
  • Dana (Romanian, Czech, Slovak, German, Hebrew)
  • Danijela (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Daniëlle (Dutch)

Sonia

Sonia is a variant spelling of Sonya, a Russian diminutive of Sofiya, the Russian, Ukrainian, and Bulgarian form of Sophia which comes from Ancient Greek sophía σοφῐ́ᾱ meaning “wisdom”, originally connoting the meaning of skill or cleverness, especially in regards to a craft or someone who was wise and learned; it derives from Ancient Greek sophos which originates from an unknown origin.

Sonia is also a popular Indian female name though in this case it seems to be derived from Sanskrit sonā सोना meaning “gold” via suvárna (meaning “gold” as a noun, and “gold, golden color; bright, brilliant hue; good color” as an adjective), which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Origin: unknown; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: ultimately from Sophia meaning “wisdom”; is also an Indian female name meaning “gold”

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, French, Greek, Russian, Indian, Hindi

74f00a9ad38036e9cfadc0c7135fdd88
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Sonya (Russian, English)
  • Sonja (German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Sonje (German)
  • Sofya (Russian)
  • Sophia (Ancient Greek, Greek, English, German)
  • Sofia (Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Italian, Greek, Finnish Estonian, Slovak, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian)
  • Sophie (French, English, German, Dutch)
  • Sophy (English)
  • Sofija (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, Latvian)
  • Sofie (German, Danish, Dutch, Czech)
  • Žofie (Czech)
  • Soňa (Czech, Slovak)
  • Sohvi (Finnish)
  • Sopio (Georgian)
  • Szofi (Hungarian)
  • Zsófia (Hungarian)
  • Szófia (Hungarian)
  • Szonja (Hungarian)
  • Soffía (Icelandic)
  • Zofia (Polish)
  • Žofia (Slovak)

Male forms:

  • Soni (Indian, Hindi)