Ridwan

Ridwan رضوان is an Arabic male name meaning “satisfaction” and “being pleased with; consent, approval”. It’s the name of an angel in Islam who guards the gates of heaven.

Origin: Arabic

Meaning: “satisfaction, contentment, approval”

Usage: Arabic, Indonesian

Variants:

  • Rizwan (Urdu, Arabic)
  • Rizvan (Azerbaijani)
  • Rıdvan (Turkish)
  • Rızvan (Turkish)

Female forms:

  • Ridwana (Arabic)
  • Rizwana (Urdu, Arabic)

Rafer

Rafer is a male given name originating as a pet-form of either Rafferty, an Irish surname meaning “flood tide” or “abundance, prosperity”; or Raphael/Rafael meaning “God has healed” or “God heals”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Hebrew

Meaning: originally a pet-form of either Rafferty “flood tide” or “abundance, prosperity” or Raphael/Rafael “God has healed”, “God heals”

Usage: English

Pronunciation: not sure. It could be either ray-fer or raffer

Ran

Ran is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. The most popular kanji I’ve seen for this name is  meaning “orchid” though it can also be written with  meaning “indigo”, either referring to the color or to the Persicaria tinctoria, the name of a species of flowering plants, also known as Chinese indigo or Japanese indigo. There may be other possible meanings. Written in hiragana, it’sらん.

Ran is also a Chinese surname written with the character 冉 meaning “tender, weak”.

Rán (pr. rawn) is also the name of a goddess of the sea in Norse mythology; she captures sailors in her net and drowns them. She is married to the giant Ægir with whom she has nine daughters who personify the waves. Though the etymology of the name is uncertain, it’s been linked to Old Norse rán meaning “robbery, theft; plunder” via Proto-Germanic *rahną, which itself derives from an uncertain origin, possibly from a PIE root word.

Ran is also a Hebrew male name, a variant transcription of Ron, meaning “to sing” from a Hebrew root word. 

Ran is also an English word, the past tense of run (to move swiftly, to go at a fast pace); rān is also an Old English word referring to an “unlawful seizure of property; robbery”.

Origin: Japanese; Chinese; uncertain, possibly PIE; Hebrew

Meaning: as a Japanese female name can mean either “orchid” or “indigo”; also a Chinese surname “weak, tender”; the name of a Norse goddess of the sea, the name of uncertain etymology though possibly “robber” or “robbery”; a Hebrew male name “to sing”; also an English word, the past tense of run, as well as an Old English word “unlawful seizure of property; robbery”

Usage: Japanese; Chinese; Old Norse; Hebrew

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Variants:

  • Rán (Old Norse)

Roland

Roland is the the name of a Frankish paladin who served under Charlemagne the Great, King of the Franks and Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, in the 8th century; according to legend, he is also depicted as Charlemagne‘s nephew. Roland was a popular figure in medieval Europe and there was even an epic poem (or chanson de gets in Old French) written about him, The Song of Roland (La Chanson de Roland) which depicts Roland’s final battle and death.

Roland is composed of Germanic elements hrod (fame) and land (land) essentially meaning “famous land”. I’ve also seen a few sites claim the second element deriving from nand meaning “brave”, but land seems more likely, essentially referring to someone who was famous throughout the land.

Roland is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “famous land” or it could be stretched out to mean “famous throughout the land”

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Polish, Medieval French

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Variants:

  • Rolland (English)
  • Rowland (English)
  • Rolin (French, English)
  • Roeland (Dutch)
  • Loránd (Hungarian)
  • Lóránt (Hungarian)
  • Hrodland (Ancient Germanic)
  • Orlando (Italian)
  • Rolando (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian)
  • Roldán (Spanish)
  • Roldão (Portuguese)
  • Rolan (Russian)

Feminine forms:

  • Rolande (French)
  • Rolanda (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Orlanda (Italian)

Roman

Roman is a male given name derived from Late Latin Romanus meaning “Roman” and “of Rome”, denoting someone who was a citizen of Rome. Rome itself is a name of uncertain origin though there are several possible theories regarding the name’s etymology:

  • according to Roman mythology, Rome’s name derives from the name of its founder and first king, Romulus whose name means “of Rome”, also of unknown meaning;
  • it may be derived from Rumen or Rumon, an archaic name for the Tiber river, which may be derived from PIE root word *srew- (to flow, stream);
  • it may have originated from Etruscan ruma meaning “teat”, perhaps in reference to the wolf that took in and suckled the infants Romulus and Remus in Roman mythology when they were left to die as infants, or it could have been named for the shape of the Palatine and Aventine hills;
  • it’s also possible that it’s from Ancient Greek rhome ῥώμη meaning “strength”, of unknown origin.

Roman is also a surname originating from the given name, though it could have also originated as a locational name for someone who came from Rome or from Italy in general, or who had made a pilgrimage there.

Origin: unknown

Meaning: “Roman, of Rome”, referring to someone who was a citizen of the Roman Empire

Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German, English

Nicknames: Roma (Russian), Ro

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Variants:

  • Romanus (Latin)
  • Romanos (Latin, Greek)
  • Romain (French)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romeo (Italian)
  • Romolo (Italian form of Romulus)
  • Romaeus (Latin form of Romeo)
  • Romà (Catalan)
  • Román (Hungarian, Spanish)
  • Romão (Portuguese)

Female forms:

  • Romana (Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman)
  • Romola (Italian feminine form of Romulus)
  • Romaine (French, English)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romayne (English)
  • Romána (Hungarian)

Ralph

Ralph is a contracted form of Old Norse Ráđúlfr meaning “wolf counsel”, made up of Old Norse elements ráđ (counsel) and úlfr (wolf). The name was first brought to England by Scandinavian settlers which was later reinforced after the Norman Conquest through its current form.

Wolves have a complicated relationship in Germanic mythology. They are viewed as a representation of chaos and destruction; in Norse mythology Fenrir was a giant wolf, the offspring of Loki and the giantess Angrboða, who was chained by the gods till the advent of Ragnarök, destined to kill the god OdinHowever, Odin himself had two wolves (Geri and Freki) who were faithful pets and represented loyalty, bravery, and wisdom, as well as ferocity and cunning. In this case, it’s possible Ralph may have essentially meant something along the lines of being as wise or cunning as a wolf. Then again, it could have just been the result of two common name elements fused together and has no particular significance attached to it.

Ralph is also an English surname originating from the given name. In British English it’s pronounced rayf while in American English it’s ralf.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “wolf counsel”

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German

Pronunciation: In British English Ralph is pronounced as rafe while in American English it’s ralf

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Variants:

  • Ráđúlfr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Radulf (Germanic)
  • Ralf (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Rafe (English)
  • Raef (English)
  • Raife (English)
  • Raif (English)
  • Raff (English)
  • Raoul (French, Italian)
  • Raul (Portuguese, Italian)
  • Raúl (Spanish)
  • Radolf (German, Dutch)
  • Raül (Catalan)
  • Rædwulf (Old English)
  • Rádhulbh (Irish)