Ivor

Ivor is a male given name, the English (British) form of Old Norse Ívarr, made up of Old Norse elements yr (yew “tree”) and arr (warrior) so the name would essentially meaning “yew warrior”. I’ve also seen the first element related to the meaning “bow”; since bows were made out of yew it’s possible that a secondary meaning arose out of it, and that the name Ívarr might have originally referred to an archer. The name was originally brought to English by Scandinavian settlers during the Middle Ages and later spread throughout Ireland, Scotland, and Wales.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “yew + warrior”, possibly in reference to an archer or someone who used a longbow

Usage: English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh

Pronunciationie-vawr (Forvo)ee-vawr

Variants:

  • Ívarr (Old Norse)
  • Ivar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian)
  • Aivar (Estonian)
  • Aivars (Latvian)
  • Iver (Norwegian)
  • Iivari (Finnish)
  • Iivo (Finnish)
  • Ibar (Old Irish)
  • Íomhar (Irish)
  • Iomhar (Scottish)
  • Evander (Scottish, English)- anglicized form of Iomhar

Rona

Rona is the name of two islands in Scotland- North Rona, a small, uninhabited island in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, and South Rona, a small, inhabited island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland.  The name seems to derive from Old Norse meaning “rough island”.

Rona is also the name of a figure in Maori mythology. She had gone to the river one night when the moon was hidden behind some clouds. When she was returning home, Rona stepped on a root or rock and was so upset, began to curse at the moon. The moon god heard her and, angered, grabbed her. The woman was so frightened she grabbed onto a ngaio tree but was still pulled up into the sky. I couldn’t find a specific meaning behind the name in Maori.

Rona is also the feminine form of Ron, a Hebrew male name meaning “song, joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Maori; Hebrew

Meaning: the name of two islands in around Scotland “rough island”; the name of a figure in Maori mythology, meaning unknown; feminine form of Hebrew Ron “song, joy”

Usage: Scottish, English, Hebrew

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Variants:

  • Rhona (Scottish)
  • Ronna (English)

Male forms:

  • Ron (Hebrew)

Douglas

Douglas is the anglicized form of Scottish surname Dubhghlas meaning “dark river” or “dark stream”, composed of Scottish Gaelic dubh (black) and glais (water; green). It comes from the name of a river in Scotland from which the name of the clan Douglas derives its name from.

Interestingly, Douglas was originally used as a unisex name in the early 17th and 18th century but eventually it only became used as a male name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “dark river” or “dark stream”

Usage: Scottish, English

NicknamesDoug

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Variants:

  • Dubhghlas (Scottish)
  • Douglass (Scottish)

Ailsa

Ailsa derives its name from Ailsa Craig, the name of a rocky island located off of Scotland. Though the name’s origin doesn’t seem certain, it’s often been linked as being derived from Alfsigesey meaning “Álfsigr’s island”, Álfsigr an Old Norse male name meaning “elf victory” composed of Old Norse elements alfr (elf) + sigr (victory). Other meanings I’ve seen listed for it are “fairy rock” or “Elizabeth’s rock” but those don’t seem very likely.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: uncertain though it’s been linked to Alfsigesey “Álfsigr’s island”

Usage: Scottish, English

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Aidan

Aidan is an Irish male name, the anglicized form of Aodhán meaning “little fire” or “little fiery one”, made up of Aodh via Old Irish Áed (fire) and the diminutive suffix -án.

In Irish mythology Aodh (pr. ae like hay) is one of the sons of King Lir and the brother of Fionnuala, Conn, and Fiachra; he and his siblings were turned into swans by their jealous stepmother Aoife for 900 years.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “little fire” or “little fiery one”

Usage: Irish, Scottish, English

Variants:

  • Aiden (English)
  • Aden (English)
  • Aydan (English)
  • Ayden (English)
  • Aedan (Irish, English)
  • Edan (Irish, Scottish)
  • Áed (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedán (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedh (Ancient Irish)
  • Aodh (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhagán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Iagan (Scottish)