Marian

Marian is probably a name many will associate with Maid Marian, a heroine in English folklore and the love interest of Robin Hood. Marian is an English female name, a variant of Marion, itself a medieval French diminutive of Marie, which ultimately derives from Hebrew Miriam,  a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

It’s also possible that Marian could be considered as a combination of the names Mary and Ann (“favor, grace”)

Marian is also a Polish, Czech, and Romanian male given name, in this case derived from Marianus, a derivative of Marius, a Roman family name on uncertain etymology and meaning. It’s been linked to Mars, the Roman god of war, but also as a masculine form of Maria (the Latinate form of Miriam) or from Latin mare “sea”, maria being its plural form. It’s also been linked to Latin mas “man, male”, but ultimately Marius may have originated from a Sabine origin.

Marian is also a Romanian, English, and French surname originating from the given name.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: a diminutive of Mary, meaning uncertain though various meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, “wished for child”, “beloved” or “love”; a combination of Mary + Ann “favor, grace”; possibly from Latin “sea” or “man, manly”; may also be related to the Roman god of war, Mars

Usage: English (female only), Polish, Czech, Romanian, German (male)

Variants:

  • Marion (French, English)
  • Marianne (French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Marielle (French)
  • Mariette (French)
  • Marise (French)
  • Maryse (French)
  • Manon (French, Dutch)
  • Mariana (Ancient Roman, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Bulgarian)

Male forms:

  • Marián (Czech, Slovak, Hungarian)
  • Marion (English)
  • Marianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Marius (Ancient Roman, German, Romanian, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French, Lithuanian, English)
  • Mariano (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Mario (Italian, Spanish, German, Croatian)

Kinvara

Kinvara is the name of a village located in the southwest County Galway, Ireland as well as the name of a town in west County Galway. The name comes from Irish Cinn Mhara meaning “head of the sea”, composed of Irish ceann (head) and mara, an inflection of muir (sea), both of which ultimately derive from a PIE origin.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “head of the sea”

Usage: English (British)

Mariel

Mariel is a diminutive of Mary, (seemingly influenced by Muriel) the English form of Hebrew Miriam, a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: uncertain though various meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, “wished for child”, “beloved” or “love”

Usage: English, Filipino

Variants:

  • Marielle (French diminutive of Marie)

Myra

Myra was first coined as a given name by English poet Fulke Greville (1554-1628) for his verse poem Caelica sonnet XXV (25). He may have based it from Latin myrrh, the the name of a natural gum or resin extracted from certain plants that was extremely valuable in the ancient world, used for perfume, incense, and medicine. The origin of the word derives from a Semitic root word meaning “bitter”.

Another possible source for the name is possibly an anagram of Mary, a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

Incidentally, Myra was also the name of an Ancient Greek town located in what is now a part of Turkey.

Origin: Semitic; uncertain/unknown etymology

Meaning: uncertain though it could possibly be based from Latin “myrrh”; also possibly an anagram of Mary, of uncertain etymology and meaning though possible meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, or “wished for child”, or “beloved”, “love”

Usage: English

Pronunciation: mie-ra (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Mayra (Spanish, Hispanic)

Marie

Marie is the Czech and French form of Maria, the Latin and Ancient Greek form of Hebrew Miriam, a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

Marie is also a Japanese female name (which I believe is pronounced mah-ree-ee, with three syllables) with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used such as:

  • ma  “truth, reality”  
  • ma 万 “ten thousand” 
  • ma 麻 “hemp, flax”
  • ri 理 “reason, logic”  
  • ri 里 “village”
  • 恵 “blessing, grace, favor”
  • “creek, inlet, bay”
  • 絵 “picture, drawing, painting”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s まりえ.

Originuncertain; Japanese

Meaning: uncertain though various meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, “wished for child”, “beloved” or “love; as a Japanese female name has a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used

Usage: French, Czech, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English

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Variants:

  • Mariette (French diminutive of Marie)
  • Maria (Latin, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrianian)
  • Mari (Welsh, Breton, Estonian, Finnish, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Mary (English)
  • Maryam (Arabic, Persian)
  • Miriam (Hebrew, English, German)

Maite

Maite is a Basque female name meaning “love, beloved, lovable”.

Maite has also been used as a Spanish nickname, or a contracted form of María TeresaMaría is the Spanish, Galician, and Icelandic form of Mary which ultimately derives from Hebrew Miriam, the name of the sister of Moses and Aaron in the Old Testament. Miriam is a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr (this latter explanation might be more likely since the names of Moses and Aaron have also been linked to a possible Egyptian origin).

Teresa is also a name of uncertain origin, the Spanish and Italian form of Theresa. As a given name it was first recorded in Spain, first used by the Spanish wife of St. Paulinus of Nola (a Roman poet, writer, and senator), though she was known as Therasia of Nola- her name seems to have derived from the name of a Greek island called Therasia, also known as Thirasía; it may be derived from Ancient Greek théros θέρος “summer; heat; harvest, crop” or from therízo θερίζω “to reap, cut”. I’ve also seen it linked to Ancient Greek thḗr θήρ “wild beast; beast of prey” or thēráō θηράω “to hunt”, but as intriguing as that meaning is I’m not too sold on it actually being related to the name.

It’s also possible that the name may have originated from a non PIE source. 

Origin: Basque; uncertain

Meaningfrom Basque “love, beloved, lovable”; also a contracted form of Spanish María Teresa

Usage: Basque, Spanish

Pronunciationmai-tay (Forvo)

 

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Variants:

  • Mayte (Spanish)
  • Maïté (French)
  • Maitê (Portuguese)
  • Maité (Spanish Mexican)

Neva

Neva is a female name with a variety of meanings and origins such as:

  • it could be a shortened form of Geneva, the name of a city in Switzerland (also spelled Genava in Latin). Though the etymology behind the name is uncertain, it’s often been linked to a Celtic word deriving from a PIE root word genu (bend), in the sense of a bending river or an estuary;
  • it’s also possible that Geneva could be used as a shortened form of Genevieve, which comes from French Geneviève, derived from medieval name Genovefa, a name of uncertain etymology. The first part of the name has been linked to Germanic *kunją (kin, family, clan) though it’s also possible it may derive from Celtic *genos (family, clan; birth), which both derive from the same PIE origin. The second part of the name comes from Proto-Germanic *wībą (woman; wife) though another possible source may be Common Celtic *wihu- (worthy, valuable) via Proto-Celtic *wesus (excellent, noble);
  • Neva is also the name of a river that runs from Russia to the Gulf of Finland. The name could be derived from Finnish nevo meaning “sea” though I’ve also seen it listed as coming from Finnish neva meaning “marsh”. Another possible origin is Swedish ny via Old Norse nýr meaning “new”, but those are all debatable; 
  • Neva is also a Finnish surname, a topographical name meaning “marsh” though it also means “waterway” in Karelian ( a type of Finnic language spoken in Karelia, located in Russia, and is closely related to Finnish);
  • I’ve also seen it listed as possibly meaning “snow”, which I’m guessing is somehow based on the Spanish word for snow; Nevadathe name of an American state, is based on Spanish meaning “snow; snow-covered”, so Neva could be based or used as a shortened form of it.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: a shortened form of Geneva, linked to a Celtic word meaning “bend”, as in a bending river or an estuary; perhaps a shortened form of Genevieve perhaps meaning “woman of the family” or “born worthy”; also the name of a river that runs from Russia through Finland, of uncertain etymology; also a Finnish surname “marsh”, “waterway”; might possibly be related to the Spanish word for “snow”

Usage: English

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