Dora

Dora is often used as a shortened form of names ending or beginning with dora such as Theodora (meaning “god’s gift”), Isadora (“gift of Isis“), Pandora (“all-giving”, “all gifts” or “all-gifted”), Medora (possibly a shortened form of Greek Metrodora “mother’s gift”), Nymphodora (“gift of the nymph” or “gift of the bride”), Menodora (“gift of the moon”), or Dorothy, Dorothea (“gift of god”), etc.

Dora could also simply be used as a given name on its own simply meaning “gift” which comes from Ancient Greek doron (gift) derived from a PIE root word.

Dora is also an Old English word meaning “bee, bumblebee” or “humming insect” via Proto-Germanic *durô (bumblebee, humming insect) derived from a PIE root word. For fans of Harry Potter, dumbledore is a dialectical word from Hampshire, Cornwall, for a bumblebee.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: often a nickname for names beginning or ending with Dora, or could simply be used on its own, simply meaning “gift; is also an Old English word for “bee, bumblebee”

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Greek, Croatian, Serbian, Dutch

Variants:

  • Dory (English)
  • Dorie (English)
  • Doree (English)
  • Doria (English)
  • Doreen (English)
  • Dorina (English, Hungarian, Romanian)