Braulio

Braulio is a Spanish and Galician male name whose most significant namesake was Braulio of Zaragoza who was a Bishop of Zaragoza who lived in the Kingdom of the Visigoths. The origin of the name is uncertain- it could have derived from Proto-Germanic *brandaz (fire; firebrand; sword).

It’s also possible that Braulio may be related to Spanish brillar “to shine, glow, to sparkle” via Italian brillare (to shine, sparkle) < Latin beryllus, berillus (beryl) < Ancient Greek berullos which ultimately seems to be derived from a Dravidian origin.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: uncertain though it’s been linked to Proto-Germanic “fire; firebrand; sword” or “to shine”, “shining”

Usage: Spanish, Galician

Variants:

  • Bráulio (Portuguese)

Eliana

Eliana is a Hebrew female name meaning “my God has answered”.

Eliana is also the Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese form of French Éliane via Ancient Roman Aeliana, the feminine form of Aelius, a Roman family name of unknown meaning though it’s often been linked to Ancient Greek helios meaning “sun”.

It’s also possible that Eliana could be a variant spelling of Ileana, the Romanian form of Helena, the Latin form of Ancient Greek Helene. The origin of the name is unknown- it’s been linked to Ancient Greek helene meaning “torch”, likely in reference to something that shines or illuminates, so the name would essentially mean “the shining one” or “the bright one”; another possible origin is from Ancient Greek selene “moon”, which would tie it to the idea of illumination and light.

Origin: Hebrew; uncertain

Meaning: from Hebrew “my God has answered”; also the Latinate form of Ancient Roman Aeliana/Aelius, possibly “sun”; could also be from Ancient Greek helene “torch” or selene “moon”, essentially meaning “the shining one” or “the bright one”

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Hebrew

Nicknames: Liana, Ellie/Elly, Lina, Nina

Variants:

  • Elliana (English)
  • Eleana (English)
  • Eleanna (English)
  • Elleana (English
  • Aeliana (Ancient Roman)
  • Éliane (French)
  • Élian (Spanish, Portuguese)

Male forms:

  • Elian (English, Spanish)
  • Elián (Spanish, Portuguese)

Zeus

Zeus is the main god in the Greek pantheon, the god of the sky and thunder, law and order, and oaths. According to mythology, he was the youngest son of the Titan Cronus and Rhea. Because his father was told that a son of his would overthrow him just as Cronus had overthrown his own father Uranus, Cronus would swallow every child Rhea gave birth to, boy or girl. When Zeus was about to be born, Rhea devised a plan to save him by swaddling a bundle of blankets or clothes with rocks and switching it out with the baby Zeus whom she gave to some nymphs to take care of. When Zeus came of age, he somehow managed to make his father gorge out the children he had swallowed and together they banded together to fight against the Titans, ending in victory for the Olympians.

The name ultimately derives from PIE *dyḗws meaning “sky, heaven; god”, a derivative of root word *dyew (bright, shine; sky, heaven).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “sky, heaven”, “god”, “bright”, “shine”

Usage: Ancient Greek

49649668ccf44bad2966017ef2f10fee
Pinterest

Male variants:

  • Zeno (Latinized Ancient Greek, Italian)
  • Zenon (Ancient Greek, Polish)
  • Zinon (Modern Greek)

Female forms:

  • Zenais (Ancient Greek)
  • Zenaida (Late Greek)
  • Zénaïs (French)

Zara

Zara is a Bulgarian diminutive of Zaharina, the Bulgarian and Macedonian feminine form of Zechariah, a Hebrew masculine name meaning “Yahweh remembers” or “Yahweh has remembered”.

Zara could also be a variant spelling of Sara meaning “lady, princess, noblewoman,” which ultimately derives from Proto-Semitic *ś-r-r (to rule), which seems to be a cognate of Akkadian šarru (king).

Zara is also the English form of Zaïre, a name created by French writer and philosopher Voltaire for his play Zaïre. He may have based it on the Arabic name Zahra زَهْرَة (flower, blossom) or from zahara زَهَرَ (to shine, to be radiant, to give light)

Origin: Hebrew, Proto-Semitic, Arabic

Meaning: a diminutive of Zaharina “Yahweh remembers” or “Yahweh has remembered”; a variant spelling of Sarah “lady, princess, noblewoman”; could also have been based on French Zaïre, itself based on Arabic Zahra “flower, blossom” or “shining, brilliant, light”

Usage: English, Bulgarian

974eb84378b06bf314ffef0c84ec5a2f
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Sarah (English, Hebrew, Arabic, French, German)
  • Sara (English, Hebrew, Arabic, Persian, Greek, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, German, French, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Polish, Bosnian, Biblical Greek)
  • Sarra (Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek)
  • Zarah (English)
  • Zahra (Arabic, Persian)
  • Zahara (Hebrew)
  • Zaïre (French)

Elena

Elena is a female given name in several languages, a cognate of Helen. In Greek mythology, Helen (Helene in Ancient Greek) is the name of a daughter of Zeus and Leda, considered to be one of the most beautiful women in the world whose kidnapping by Paris led to the 10 year Trojan war.

The origin of Helen is unknown- it’s been linked to Ancient Greek helene meaning “torch”, likely in reference to something that shines or illuminates, so the name would essentially mean “the shining one” or “the bright one”; another possible origin is from Ancient Greek selene “moon”, which would tie it to the idea of illumination and light.

Elena is also a variant transcription of Yelena the Russian form of Helen.

Origin: uncertain, though it may be derived from a pre-Greek source

Meaning: uncertain, though it’s been linked to Ancient Greek helene “torch” or selene “moon”, essentially meaning “the shining one” or “the bright one”

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, Greek, German, English

Variants:

  • Elene (Georgian, Sardinian)
  • Eleni (Modern Greek)
  • Helen (Greek, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Helena (English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian)
  • Helene (French, English, Ancient Greek, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German)
  • Hélène (French)
  • Heléna (Hungarian)
  • Elin (Scandinavian, Welsh, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Elīna (Latvian)
  • Helēna (Latvian)
  • Elēna (Latvian)
  • Jeļena (Latvian)
  • Elina (Finnish, Swedish)
  • Eliina (Finnish)
  • Heleena (Finnish)
  • Eline (Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Ileana (Romanian, Spanish, Italian)
  • Yelena (Russian)
  • Alyona (originally a Russian diminutive of Yelena)
  • Elaine (English, Old French)
  • Elaina (English)
  • Alena (Belarusian)
  • Jelena (Serbian, Croatian, Estonian, Slovene, Lithuanian)
  • Heleen (Dutch)
  • Ellen (English)
  • Léan (Irish)
  • Olena (Ukrainian)
  • Elen (Welsh)