Celia

Celia is a female given name, the English form of Latin Caelia, the feminine form of Roman family name (or nomen) Caelius which derives from Latin caelum meaning “heaven” of uncertain origin; though it could be derived from a PIE origin.

It was used by William Shakespeare for one of his characters in As You Like It (1623), as well as also being used by English poet Edmund Spenser (1552/53-1599) in his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590, 1596).

Celia could also be used as a nickname for Cecilia, another name derived from a Roman family name, though in this case it derives from Latin caecus meaning “blind” via PIE *káykos (one-eyed, blind).

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: “heaven”; could also be a nickname for Cecilia “blind”

Usage: English, Spanish

Variants:

  • Caelia (Ancient Roman)
  • Célia (French, Portuguese)
  • Célie (French)
  • Cèlia (Catalan)
  • Ĉiela (Esperanto)
  • Silke (Dutch diminutive of Celia or Cecilia)
  • Selia (English)
  • Seelia (English)

Zeus

Zeus is the main god in the Greek pantheon, the god of the sky and thunder, law and order, and oaths. According to mythology, he was the youngest son of the Titan Cronus and Rhea. Because his father was told that a son of his would overthrow him just as Cronus had overthrown his own father Uranus, Cronus would swallow every child Rhea gave birth to, boy or girl. When Zeus was about to be born, Rhea devised a plan to save him by swaddling a bundle of blankets or clothes with rocks and switching it out with the baby Zeus whom she gave to some nymphs to take care of. When Zeus came of age, he somehow managed to make his father gorge out the children he had swallowed and together they banded together to fight against the Titans, ending in victory for the Olympians.

The name ultimately derives from PIE *dyḗws meaning “sky, heaven; god”, a derivative of root word *dyew (bright, shine; sky, heaven).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “sky, heaven”, “god”, “bright”, “shine”

Usage: Ancient Greek

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Male variants:

  • Zeno (Latinized Ancient Greek, Italian)
  • Zenon (Ancient Greek, Polish)
  • Zinon (Modern Greek)

Female forms:

  • Zenais (Ancient Greek)
  • Zenaida (Late Greek)
  • Zénaïs (French)

Leanne

Leanne is an English female name, a combination of Lee (which comes from an English surname meaning “clearing”) and Anne (which comes from Hebrew meaning “favor, grace” via a Proto-Semitic root). 

It could also be a variant spelling of Liane, itself the German and French form of the Liana plant, a type of long-stemmed wooded vine that grows in the jungle. The word derives from Middle French lien (to bind) via Latin ligo (to bind) which derives from PIE root word *leyǵ- (to bind, tie); though Liane is also used as a shortened form of names such as Éliane (the French form of Aeliana, the feminine form of Aelius, a Roman family name of uncertain meaning though it’s been linked to Ancient Greek helios meaning “sun”) or Juliane (the French and German form of Julian from Ancient Roman name Julius of uncertain meaning though it’s been linked to Greek ioulos (downy-bearded) or related to Jupiter, the name of the Roman god derived from Indo-European *Dyeu-Pater meaning “sky father”).

OriginProto-Indo-European, Proto-Semitic; uncertain

Meaning: a combination of given names Lee and Anne “clearing + favor, grace”; could also be a variant spelling of Liane, the German French form of liana, a type of long-climbing vine; also a shortened form of names such as Éliane (the French form of Aeliana, of uncertain meaning, possibly related to helios “sun”), or Juliane (the feminine form of Julian, related to Jupiter “sky father”).

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Lianne (English, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Finnish)
  • Liane (German, French)
  • Leann (English)
  • Lee-Ann (English)
  • Lee-Anne (English)
  • Lee Ann (English)
  • Lee Anne (English)
  • Li-Anne (English)