Annette

Annette originated as a French diminutive of Anne < Anna meaning “favor, grace” via Hebrew root word hanan חנן (to be gracious, merciful, compassionate) which seems to be derived from a Proto-Semitic origin.

Origin: Proto-Semitic

Meaning: “favor, grace”

Usage: French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch

Variants:

Carl

Carl originated as the German form of Charles, the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Variants:

  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, English)
  • Carolus (Latinized Ancient Germanic)

Female forms:

  • Carla (German, Italian, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Croatian)

Meta

Meta is a Scandinavian, German, and Slovene short form of Margareta from English Margaret meaning “pearl” which comes from Ancient Greek margarítēs μαργᾰρῑ́της (pearl) which derives from an unknown origin, though it could be derived from an Indo-Iranian origin.

Meta (μετά) is also the name of a minor figure in Greek mythology, the first wife of Aegeus (the king of Athens and father of Theseus with a different woman). The name means “beyond” and derives from the same Greek prefix meaning “after” or “beyond” which derives from a PIE root word.

Meta is also a surname- first an Albanian surname whose meaning I couldn’t find, and it’s also a Japanese surname written with the kanji 米 (rice) + 田 “rice paddy, rice field” and written in hiragana as めた.

Origin: uncertain though possibly from an Indo-Iranian source; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: a shorted form of Margareta “pearl”; also a Greek prefix “after” or “beyond”

Usage: German, Danish, Swedish, Slovene, Ancient Greek

Björk

Björk is an Icelandic and Swedish female name meaning “birch tree” via Old Norse bjǫrk (birch) via Proto-Germanic *berkō which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Björk (also spelled Bjork) is also a Swedish and Norwegian surname, a locational name for someone who lived near some birch trees.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “birch tree”

Usage: Icelandic, Swedish

Pronunciation: b-yurk (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Bjørk (Norwegian, Danish, Faroese)
  • Bjork (anglicized spelling of the name)

Male forms:

  • Birkir (Icelandic)
  • Bjarki (Icelandic)

Björn

Björn is a Swedish and Icelandic male name meaning “bear” via Old Norse bjǫrn (bear) via Proto-Germanic *berô (bear) via a PIE root word.

Björn is also a Swedish surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “bear”

Usage: Swedish, Icelandic, German, Dutch)

Pronunciation: b-yorn; Forvo

Variants:

  • Bjoern (German)
  • Bjørn (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Bjǫrn (Old Norse, Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Bjarni (Icelandic, Faroese, Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Bjarne (Danish, Norwegian, Swedish)

Dagmar

Dagmar is a Scandinavian and German female name meaning “day maid” made up of Old Norse elements dagr (day) < Proto-Germanic *dagaz which derives from an uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to PIE root *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn); and mær (maid, girl; and, in a more poetic sense, daughter).

I’ve also seen Dagmar listed as being an Old Danish form of Slavic Dragomira, the feminine form of Dragomir meaning “dear, precious + peace; world”

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Proto-Slavic

Meaning: “day maid”; could also have originated from Slavic Dragomira “dear, precious + peace; world”

Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak

Variants:

  • Dagmær (Ancient Scandinavian, Old Norse)
  • Dagmara (Polish)
  • Dagna (Polish)
  • Dagnė (Lithuanian)

Signy

Signy is the Norwegian form of Old Norse Signý, made up of Old Norse elements sigr (victory) and nýr (new). It’s the name of a few figures in Norse mythology, including the sister of Sigmund.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “new + victory”

Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, Danish

Variants:

  • Signý (Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic)
  • Signe (Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Estonian, Latvian)
  • Signa (Icelandic, Faroese, Danish, Swedish)

Sven

Sven is a Scandinavian male name via Old Norse Sveinn, originally a byname meaning “boy, servant” via Proto-Germanic *swainaz (relative; kinsman; young man) which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Sven is also a Swedish word meaning “squire” or “page”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “boy”

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Estonian

Variants:

  • Svein (Norwegian)
  • Svend (Danish)
  • Sveinn (Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic)
  • Soini (Finnish)

Female forms:

  • Svenja (German)

Karolina

Karolina is the Scandinavian and Slavic form of Caroline, the French form of Carolus which is the Latin form of Charles,the English form of Old High German Karl meaning “man, husband” via Proto-Germanic *karlaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, thus connoting the idea of a “free man”, those who were not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, German

Variants:

  • Karolína (Czech, Slovak)
  • Karolīna (Latvian)
  • Carolina (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Swedish, English)

Charlotte

Charlotte is the French feminine form of Charlot, which is the French male diminutive of Charles which comes from Germanic Karl meaning “man” via Proto-Germanic *karilaz (free man), of uncertain etymology but likely deriving from a PIE origin. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”, someone not tied down to a lord or to the land, able to go wherever they wanted.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Meaning: “free man”

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Nicknames: Charlie/Charlee, Lottie

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Variants:

  • Charlotta (Swedish)
  • Charlene (English)
  • Charline (English)
  • Charlena (English)
  • Carlotta (Italian)
  • Carlota (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carla (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Carline (English, French, Dutch, German)
  • Caroline (English, French, German, Swedish Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Carolina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English Swedish)

Male forms:

  • Charlot (French)
  • Carolus (Latin)
  • Karolos (Greek)
  • Charles (English, French)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Carles (Catalan)
  • Karlo (Croatian)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Karel (Dutch, Czech, Slovene)
  • Karol (Polish, Slovak, Slovene)
  • Kaarle (Finnish)
  • Kaarlo (Finnish)
  • Kale (Hawaiian)
  • Károly (Hungarian)
  • Séarlas (Irish)
  • Sjarel (Limburgish)
  • Karolis (Lithuanian)
  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Carol (Romanian)
  • Siarl (Welsh)

Victor

Victor comes from a Late Latin name via Latin victor meaning “conqueror; victor” as a noun and “victorious, triumphant, conquering” as an adjective, from Latin vincere (to win) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word.

The English word victor refers to the winner of a fight which derives from the Latin word. 

Victor is also a French and English surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “conqueror; victor”

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman

Nicknames: Vic

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Variants:

  • Viktor (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Vitya (Russian diminutive of Viktor)
  • Vicktor (English, Swedish)
  • Victorius (Late Roman)
  • Bittor (Basque)
  • Viktar (Belarusian)
  • Víctor (Catalan, Spanish)
  • Vítor (Galician, Portuguese)
  • Vihtori (Finnish)
  • Vittorio (Italian form of Victorius)
  • Vittore (Italian)
  • Viktors (Latvian)
  • Viktoras (Lithuanian)
  • Wiktor (Polish)
  • Gwythyr (Welsh)

Female forms:

  • Victoria (English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman)
  • Viktoria (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian)
  • Viktoriya (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Viktoriia (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Viktoryia (Belarusian)
  • Victòria (Catalan)
  • Vitória (Portuguese)
  • Viktorija (Lithuanian, Latvian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Wiktorija (Polish)
  • Victoire (French)
  • Viktorie (Czech)
  • Wikolia (Hawaiian)
  • Viktória (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Vittoria (Italian)
  • Latoya (African-American)