Dean

Dean comes from an English surname, either a locational name meaning “valley” via Old English dene (valley), or an occupational name for someone who worked for a dean, the head of an ecclesiastical head of a cathedral. It comes from Latin decānus (chief of ten people) via decem (ten), which ultimately derives from a PIE root word.

A dean is also the head of a college or university, or someone in charge of a department or faculty.

Dean could also be used as a variant spelling of Deen or Dīn (دين)an Arabic male name meaning “religion, faith, creed” and “way of life” as well as having roots in Hebrew din דִּין meaning “law, judgment”, which seems to be derived from a Proto-Semitic origin.

OriginProto-Indo-European; Proto-Semitic

Meaning: an English surname “valley” or “chief of ten”; from Arabic “religion, faith, creed” or “way of life”; also from Hebrew “law, judgment”

Usage: English, Arabic, Hebrew

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Variants:

  • Dene (English)
  • Dane (English)
  • Deane (English)
  • Deen (Arabic)
  • Dīn (Arabic)

Female forms:

  • Dena (English, Arabic)
  • Dina (English, Arabic)
  • Deena (English)
  • Deanna (English)
  • Deana (English)
  • Deanne (English)
  • Deann (English)

Arden

Arden comes from an English surname, a locational name for someone who came from Arden in Warwickshire or the one from North Yorkshire. The name seems to derive from a Celtic source, via Celtic *ardwo meaning “high”. Another possible meaning I’ve seen listed for Arden as a surname is “eagle valley”, made up of Old English elements earn (eagle) and dene (valley).

Arden is also a Spanish word, the third person plural or arder meaning “to burn”, derived from Latin ardere

Arden is the name of several places in England, including the Forest of Arden located in Warwickshire; the Forest of Arden is the main setting used in William Shakespeare’s play As You Like It (1599), which may have been based on the Ardennes, a heavily forested, hilly region spread out among France, Germany, Luxembourg, and Belgium, which may derive from the same Celtic root word as above. 

Origin: uncertain, either from a Celtic or a Proto-Indo-European source

Meaning: as an English surname it seems to derive from a Celtic source “high”, though it may also mean “eagle valley”; also a Spanish word “they burn”

Usage: English

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