Ghazi

Ghazi غَازِي is an Arabic male name meaning “warrior, champion, hero” and derives from a word referring to a Muslim warrior who fights against non-Muslims; ghazi is the active particle of ḡazā غَزَا (to raid, to attack, to wage war against; to overwhelm, overcome) derived from a root word related to intending to taking over. This was later adopted by several Ottoman Sultans as a title.

Ghazi is also an Arabic surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Arabic

Meaning: “warrior, champion, hero”

Usage: Arabic

Variants:

  • Gazi (Arabic, Ottoman Turkish)
  • Ghazy (Egyptian Arabic)

Ivor

Ivor is a male given name, the English (British) form of Old Norse Ívarr, made up of Old Norse elements yr (yew “tree”) and arr (warrior) so the name would essentially meaning “yew warrior”. I’ve also seen the first element related to the meaning “bow”; since bows were made out of yew it’s possible that a secondary meaning arose out of it, and that the name Ívarr might have originally referred to an archer. The name was originally brought to English by Scandinavian settlers during the Middle Ages and later spread throughout Ireland, Scotland, and Wales.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “yew + warrior”, possibly in reference to an archer or someone who used a longbow

Usage: English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh

Pronunciationie-vawr (Forvo)ee-vawr

Variants:

  • Ívarr (Old Norse)
  • Ivar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian)
  • Aivar (Estonian)
  • Aivars (Latvian)
  • Iver (Norwegian)
  • Iivari (Finnish)
  • Iivo (Finnish)
  • Ibar (Old Irish)
  • Íomhar (Irish)
  • Iomhar (Scottish)
  • Evander (Scottish, English)- anglicized form of Iomhar

Hera

Hera is the goddess of marriage, women, birth, and family in Greek mythology. She is also the queen of the gods, the wife of Zeus. Apparently, Zeus fell in love with her at first sight but she refused his marriage proposal. Refusing to give up so easily, he turned himself into a cuckoo bird (knowing that Hera loved animals) and pretended to be in trouble. Feeling pity for the small creature, Hera held the poor creature to her breast. Zeus transformed back into himself and she agreed to be his wife out of shame. Their marriage, though, was anything but a happy one. Zeus was a womanizer and fathered many children with many women, to Hera’s intense jealousy, and she would often go after these poor women and their offspring with vengeance.

Hera and Zeus had several children together, including Ares (god of war), Eileithyia (goddess of childbirth), Hebe (goddess of youth), and Hera is the mother of Hephaestus, god of fire and the forge, whom she bore on her own without Zeus’s help when he gave birth to Athena through his head. 

Some symbols of Hera are the cuckoo bird, peacocks, pomegranates, the scepter and the diadem, as well as the cow, the lion, the apple tree, the willow, the fig, the myrrh, lily, and the orange tree.

Although the etymology behind the name Hera is uncertain, it’s often been associated with Ancient Greek hora ὥρᾱ (time, season) or heros ἥρως (hero, warrior), perhaps in reference to her as a protectress. It’s also possibly the name likely originated from a pre-Greek source.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: uncertain though it’s been linked to Ancient Greek hora “time, season” or heros “hero, warrior” 

Usage: Ancient Greek

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Variants:

  • Era (Italian)
  • Héra (French, Hungarian, Czech
  • Ira (Modern Greek)