Braulio

Braulio is a Spanish and Galician male name whose most significant namesake was Braulio of Zaragoza who was a Bishop of Zaragoza who lived in the Kingdom of the Visigoths. The origin of the name is uncertain- it could have derived from Proto-Germanic *brandaz (fire; firebrand; sword).

It’s also possible that Braulio may be related to Spanish brillar “to shine, glow, to sparkle” via Italian brillare (to shine, sparkle) < Latin beryllus, berillus (beryl) < Ancient Greek berullos which ultimately seems to be derived from a Dravidian origin.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: uncertain though it’s been linked to Proto-Germanic “fire; firebrand; sword” or “to shine”, “shining”

Usage: Spanish, Galician

Variants:

  • Bráulio (Portuguese)

Berengaria

Berengaria is the Latinized feminine form of Berengar, an Ancient Germanic name made up of Proto-Germanic berô (bear) and Proto-Germanic *gaizaz (spear), both of which derive from a PIE source.

Berengaria seems to have been a popular name among Spanish royalty, the name of several queen consorts and daughters of Castilian kings and queens.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “bear + spear”

Usage: Spanish, Italian

Variants:

  • Bérengère (French)

Male forms:

  • Bérenger (French)
  • Berengar (Ancient Germanic)
  • Berenguer (Catalan)
  • Berengario (Italian)
  • Berengier (Occitan)
  • Berenguier (Occitan)

Ivor

Ivor is a male given name, the English (British) form of Old Norse Ívarr, made up of Old Norse elements yr (yew “tree”) and arr (warrior) so the name would essentially meaning “yew warrior”. I’ve also seen the first element related to the meaning “bow”; since bows were made out of yew it’s possible that a secondary meaning arose out of it, and that the name Ívarr might have originally referred to an archer. The name was originally brought to English by Scandinavian settlers during the Middle Ages and later spread throughout Ireland, Scotland, and Wales.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “yew + warrior”, possibly in reference to an archer or someone who used a longbow

Usage: English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh

Pronunciationie-vawr (Forvo)ee-vawr

Variants:

  • Ívarr (Old Norse)
  • Ivar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian)
  • Aivar (Estonian)
  • Aivars (Latvian)
  • Iver (Norwegian)
  • Iivari (Finnish)
  • Iivo (Finnish)
  • Ibar (Old Irish)
  • Íomhar (Irish)
  • Iomhar (Scottish)
  • Evander (Scottish, English)- anglicized form of Iomhar

Brandon

Brandon comes from an English surname, a locational name for any of several places called Brandon. The name is composed of Old English elements brōm (broom) and dūn (hill), essentially meaning “hill covered with broom”, likely in reference to a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs. However, the town of Brandon in Lincolnshire seems to have gotten its name from Old English brant (tall, high, steep) which seems to be in reference to the steep banks of a river nearby.

However, Brandon is also a French surname which in this case comes from Old French brandon meaning “firebrand”, referring to a piece of burning wood or other burning material; it can also be used to refer to someone who causes trouble, a troublemaker or agitator. It derives from Frankish *brand (fire, flame) as well as also being a poetic word for “sword”; via Proto-Germanic *brandaz (fire; firebrand; torch; sword) ultimately derived from a PIE root word.

In some cases, Brandon could also be used as an anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Breandáin meaning “son of Breandán”, the latter a variant of Irish name Brendan meaning “prince, king” via Proto-Celtic *brigantīnos, a diminutive of *brigantī (high, exalted) which derives from a PIE root word.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: a surname with a few possible origins: “broom hill” or essentially “hill covered with broom”; “steep hill”; a French surname “firebrand”; also an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Breandáin “son of Breandán”, Breandán meaning “prince, king”

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Branden (English)
  • Brendan (Irish, English, Breton)