Vermilion

Vermilion refers to a vivid reddish-orange color originally made from grinding up the mineral cinnabar, which contains mercury, making it toxic. It comes from Old French vermeillon (vermilion) via vermeil from Latin vermiculus (a kind of red worm), a derivative of vermis (worm) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word. Apparently, the name derives…

Cinnabar

Cinnabar is the name of a bright red color with an orange tint and is the source the color vermilion comes from. The origin of the word comes from Old French cinabre via Latin cinnabaris via Ancient Greek kinnabari, itself derived from a pre-Greek origin, perhaps from an Oriental origin, either via an Arabic or…

Olive

Olive is a female given name which comes from the olive tree, its fruit cultivated since ancient times for cooking and skincare use. The name comes from Old French olive (olive, olive tree) via Latin olīva (olive), itself of uncertain origin. It’s been linked to Ancient Greek elaia (olive tree) via a Proto-Hellenic source, though…

Bannister

Bannister comes from an English surname, an occupational name for a basket-maker. The name comes from Anglo-Norman French banastre meaning “basket”, which seems to a Late Latin combination of Gaulish benna (carriage) and kanistron (wicker basket), Bannister is not related to banister, a word referring to a handrail at the side of the stairs. Origin:…

Ami

Ami could be used as a variant spelling of Amy meaning “beloved” which comes from Latin amātus (loved, beloved) derived from a PIE root word. Ami (pr. a-mee; Forvo) is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used: a 亜 “Asia, second, ranking next” + mi 美 “beauty, beautiful” a 亜…

Genta

Genta is a Japanese male name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used: gen 拳 “fist” + ta 太 “fat, plump, thick” gen 元 “cause, origin; beginning; former time” + ta 太 “fat, plump, thick” gen 厳 “stern, strict” + ta 多“many, much” gen 弦 “bowstring” + ta 太 “fat, plump, thick” gen…

Chesten

Chesten is a Cornish female name, the Cornish form of Christine, the French form of Christina, a shortened form of Christiana, the feminine form of Christian which comes from Latin Christianus meaning “a Christian”, referring to someone who followed Christianity. Christian comes from Ancient Greek Khristos meaning “anointed” or “the anointed one”, via from Ancient Greek khrī́ō (to anoint oneself, to rub) derived from a PIE root…

Cleveland

Cleveland comes from an English surname, a locational name meaning “hilly land” or “cliff land”, likely referring to rocky or hilly land. It’s composed of Old English elements clif (cliff; group of rocks or crag) and land (land). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Meaning: “hilly land” or “cliff land” Usage: English Nicknames: Cleve Variants: Cleaveland (English)

Evadne

Evadne is the name of several figures in Greek mythology, one of whom is the daughter of the sea god Poseidon and the mother of Iamos by Apollo. Evadne is composed of Ancient Greek elements eu εὖ (well) and adnos ἀδνός (holy), a Cretan dialectal form of hagnos (holy, pure), so the name means “well + holy”, which could…

Livy

Livy is the English form of Latin Livius, an Ancient Roman family name of uncertain meaning though it’s been linked to Latin liveo meaning “to envy” or lividus meaning “bluish; envious”.  It’s often used to refer to the Roman historian Titus Livius, who is well-known for writing a history of Rome from its founding to his present. Livy is…

Charisma

Charisma is a female given name which derives from the English word which refers to a personal charm or magnetism that can inspire devotion or loyalty from others. It was originally used in a theological context in the sense of an individual being a God-given talent, quality, or grace. The origin of the word comes…

Dakin

Dakin comes from an English surname with two very different origins: the first is that it originated as a pet-form for David, which comes from Hebrew meaning “beloved”; it may also have originated from Old English given names Daegberht (meaning “day + bright” from Old English elements dæg (day) and beraht (bright); or Daegmund (meaning…