Duvessa

Duvessa is the anglicized form of Dubh Essa meaning “black waterfall”, made up of Irish dubh (black; black-haired) and eas (waterfall, cascade, rapid). Dubh Essa (also spelled Dubhessa) was a fairy common given name in medieval Ireland, in the 13th/14th century.

Duvessa was used in Irish playwright M.J. Molloy’s play The Wooing of Duvessa (1964).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “black waterfall”

Usage: medieval Irish

Variants:

  • Dubh Essa (medieval Irish)
  • Dubhessa (medieval Irish(

Dagmar

Dagmar is a Scandinavian and German female name meaning “day maid” made up of Old Norse elements dagr (day) < Proto-Germanic *dagaz which derives from an uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to PIE root *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn); and mær (maid, girl; and, in a more poetic sense, daughter).

I’ve also seen Dagmar listed as being an Old Danish form of Slavic Dragomira, the feminine form of Dragomir meaning “dear, precious + peace; world”

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Proto-Slavic

Meaning: “day maid”; could also have originated from Slavic Dragomira “dear, precious + peace; world”

Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak

Variants:

  • Dagmær (Ancient Scandinavian, Old Norse)
  • Dagmara (Polish)
  • Dagna (Polish)
  • Dagnė (Lithuanian)

Desideria

Desideria is the feminine form of Desiderio, the Italian and Spanish form of Late Latin Desiderius meaning “longing, desire” via desidero (to desire, want, wish for) which seems to have originated from the phrase de sidere (‘from the stars’ or ‘of the stars’), made up of Latin prefix de- (of, from) and sidus(star, constellation).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “desire, longing”

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman

Variants:

  • Désirée (French)
  • Desiree (French, English)
  • Desirae (English)
  • Deziree (English)
  • Desirée (German, Swedish)
  • Desiderata (Late Roman)
  • Desidéria (Portuguese)
  • Desire (English)

Male forms:

  • Désiré (French)
  • Desire (French, English)
  • Desideratus (Late Roman)
  • Desiderio (Spanish, Italian)
  • Desidério (Portuguese)
  • Didier (French)
  • Dezső (Hungarian)

Dora

Dora is often used as a shortened form of names ending or beginning with dora such as Theodora (meaning “god’s gift”), Isadora (“gift of Isis“), Pandora (“all-giving”, “all gifts” or “all-gifted”), Medora (possibly a shortened form of Greek Metrodora “mother’s gift”), Nymphodora (“gift of the nymph” or “gift of the bride”), Menodora (“gift of the moon”), or Dorothy, Dorothea (“gift of god”), etc.

Dora could also simply be used as a given name on its own simply meaning “gift” which comes from Ancient Greek doron (gift) derived from a PIE root word.

Dora is also an Old English word meaning “bee, bumblebee” or “humming insect” via Proto-Germanic *durô (bumblebee, humming insect) derived from a PIE root word. For fans of Harry Potter, dumbledore is a dialectical word from Hampshire, Cornwall, for a bumblebee.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: often a nickname for names beginning or ending with Dora, or could simply be used on its own, simply meaning “gift; is also an Old English word for “bee, bumblebee”

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Greek, Croatian, Serbian, Dutch

Variants:

  • Dory (English)
  • Dorie (English)
  • Doree (English)
  • Doria (English)
  • Doreen (English)
  • Dorina (English, Hungarian, Romanian)

Delora

Delora is an English female name, a variant of Dolores, a Spanish female name meaning “sorrows”. It comes from the Spanish title La Virgen María de los Dolores (The Virgin Mary of the Sorrows); dolores is the Spanish and Latin plural form of dolor meaning “pain, grief, sorrow” derived from PIE *delh₁-* (to split, divide).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “sorrows”

Usage: English

Nicknames: Del, Delly, Della, Lora

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Variants:

  • Dolores (Spanish, English)
  • Delores (English)
  • Deloris (English)
  • Dolors (Catalan)
  • Dores (Portuguese, Galician)
  • Addolorata (Italian)
  • Dolorès (French)
  • Lola (Spanish & English diminutive of Dolores)
  • Lolita (Spanish & English diminutive of Dolores)
  • Loli (Spanish & English diminutive of Dolores)