Daphne

Daphne is the name of a naiad (a female nymph who presided over fountains, wells, springs, rivers, streams, brooks, and any type of fresh water) in Greek mythology. One day she caught the eye of the god Apollo and he pursued her in spite of her rejections. Just as he was about to catch her, Daphne called out to her father, the river god Ladon, for help (in some versions it’s the goddess of the earth, Gaia) and was transformed into a laurel tree. Since than, Apollo adopted the laurel as one of his symbols and a wreath of laurels was given as a prize for the victors in games. Daphne means “laurel, bay” from Ancient Greek which may be derived from a much older source, possibly pre-Greek, but that’s uncertain.

Origin: Ancient Greek

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Variants:

  • Daphné (French)
  • Daphnée (French)
  • Dafni (Modern Greek)
  • Dafina (Albanian, Macedonian)
  • Dafne (Italian)
  • Dafnee (English)

 

Xenon

Xenon is an Ancient Greek male name meaning “foreigner, guest” from Ancient Greek xenos (foreigner; stranger, guest) which seems likely to be derived from a Pre-Greek origin. Xenon is also the name of a chemical element.

Origin: Ancient Greek

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Female forms:

  • Xeno (Ancient Greek)
  • Xena (English)
  • Xenia (Greek, Ancient Greek)
  • Zena (English)
  • Zeena (English)
  • Zenia (English form of Xenia)
  • Oxana (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Oksana ((Ukrainian, Russian)
  • Kseniya (Russian)
  • Aksinya (Russian)
  • Ksenija (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene)
  • Ksenia (Polish)
  • Senja (Finnish)

 

Xenon- Ξενων (Ancient Greek)

 

Sidero

Sidero is the name of a figure in Greek mythology, the second wife of Salmoneus, a king, and the stepmother to his daughter Tyro, whom she apparently mistreated. Sidero was later killed by Tyro’s twin sons Pelias and Neleus (fathered by the god Poseidon); she was killed in a temple of Hera‘s which earned her the undying hatred of Pelias, the uncle of Jason of Argonaut fame. Sidero comes from Ancient Greek sídēros meaning “iron” which seems to be derived from a PIE root word.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

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Amos

Amos comes from Hebrew meaning “carried (by God)” which comes from a Hebrew verb meaning “to carry, load; burden”. It’s also a surname which could be derived from the given name, but it also has another origin as an English surname derived from Old French Amis, originally a nickname meaning “friend” which comes from Latin amicus (friend), a derivative of amare (to love) which could be derived from a PIE root word.

Amos is also the name of an ancient city in Turkey. From what I could find, the name comes from Greek ámmos meaning “sand”, likely referring to the soil around the area.

Origin: Hebrew, Proto-Indo-European, Greek

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Variants:

  • Amós (Portuguese, Spanish)

 

Iamos

Iamos is the name of a figure in Greek mythology, the son of Evadne (the daugher of the sea god Poseidon), and ApolloEvadne was ashamed of her pregnancy and so, when her son was born, she left him exposed to the elements, lying on a bed of violets, where he survived by being fed honey by two snakes before his mother came back for him. Iamos grew up to be a seer and founded the Iamidai (house of Iamos), a family of seers. Iamos means “of the violets” derived from Greek ion meaning “violet”. Iamos is also a word in Galician, a first-person plural imperative of ir (to go; to work, function); íamos is the Portuguese spelling of the word.

Origin: Greek, Proto-Indo-European

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Variants:

  • Iamus (Latinized form)

 

Perrine

Perrine is the French feminine form of Perrin, a French diminutive of Pierre, the French form of Peter meaning “stone, rock” from Ancinet Greek petros (stone, rock) derived from an unknown source. Perrine is also a French surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Greek

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Variants:

  • Perine (French)

 

Male forms:

  • Perrin (French)

 

Kati

Kati (pr. kah-tee) is a variant spelling of Káti, an Old Norse male name meaning “merry, cheerful” from Old Norse kátr (jolly, merry, cheerful, glad). Kati is also a Finnish, Estonian, and Hungarian short form of Katariina (Finnish, Estonian) and Katalin (Hungarian, Basque) which both derive from Katherine, the English form of Greek Aikaterine though the etymology behind the name is not certain. It could be derived from another Greek name, Hekaterine from hekateros meaning “each of the two” or from Hecate, the name of the Greek goddess of witchcraft, the underworld, and crossroads, from hekas possibly meaning “far off” though another theory states it comes from a Greek word meaning “will”. It might also be derived from Greek aikia “torture”. Katherine could also be from a Coptic name meaning “my consecration of your name”. The spelling of the name was later changed to be associated with Greek katharos “pure”. It could also be a variant spelling of Katie, an English diminutive of Katherine.

Origin: Old Norse, Ancient Greek, Coptic

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Male forms:

  • Káti (Old Norse)

 

Kaija

Kaija (pr. kai-ya) is a Finnish female name, a diminutive of Katariina, the Finnish and Estonian form of Katherine, the English form of Greek Aikaterine though the etymology behind the name is not certain. It could be derived from another Greek name, Hekaterine from hekateros meaning “each of the two” or from Hecate, the name of the Greek goddess of witchcraft, the underworld, and crossroads, from hekas possibly meaning “far off” though another theory states it comes from a Greek word meaning “will”. It might also be derived from Greek aikia “torture”. Katherine could also be from a Coptic name meaning “my consecration of your name”. The spelling of the name was later changed to be associated with Greek katharos “pure”.

Kaija is also a Latvian word meaning “gull, seagull”

Origin: Ancient Greek, Coptic, Latvian

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Variants:

  • Kaia (Norwegian, Estonian)
  • Kaya (English)
  • Kaisa (Finnish diminutive of Katariina)
  • Iina (Finnish diminutive)
  • Kata (Finnish diminutive)
  • Kati (Finnish)
  • Katri (Finnish)
  • Riina (Finnish)

 

Galatea

Galatea is the name of a few figures in Greek mythology, the most well-known being the story of Pygmalion and Galatea. In this story, Pygmalion is a sculptor who fell in love with his own ivory sculpture of a beautiful woman. He prayed to Aphrodite who turned the statue into a living person and the two married and lived happily. The statue was never named in Greek mythology but became known as Galatea in the 18th century as the story became popular. Another Galatea was a woman who prayed for her daughter to be turned into a son, and it also belonged to one of the Nereids, the 50 daughters of Nereus, god of the sea. Galatea was a sea nymph who caught the attention of the cyclops Polyphemos who tried to woo her but she rejected him for a handsome mortal named Akis (or Acis). Angry, Polyphemos crushed Akis beneath a rock and, grief-stricken, Galatea transformed Akis into a stream. Interestingly enough, Polyphemos is the same cyclops Odysseus later encounters and blinds, earning himself the wrath of Poseidon and causing him to spend 10 years at sea before finally able to reach home. The name means “goddess of calm seas” from Greek galene γαλήνη (calm, stillness of sea or wind) and theia/thea (goddess). The first part of the name may also be derived from gala γάλα (milky white) from a PIE root word.

Nicknames: Gal, Gala, Tea

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-Indo-European

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Variants:

  • Galateia (Ancient Greek)
  • Galatia (Greek)
  • Galathea (Greek)
  • Gallathea (Greek, English)
  • Galathée (French)

 

Briseis

Briseis is the name of a character in the Iliad, who was captured by Greek forces and became Achilles’s slave and concubine. Her real name was Hippodameia though she was known as Briseis because her father’s name was Briseus, a sort of patronymic name giving her as the daughter of Briseus. When Agamemnon was forced to give up his own concubine Chryseis he demanded Briseis from Achilles, which caused Achilles to withdraw from the battle until the death of Patrocles. The name is of unknown meaning though it could be related to Greek britho meaning “to be weighed down (with something) and “to prevail”.

Origin: Ancient Greek

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Variants:

  • Briseida (medieval English form)
  • Briséïs (French)

 

Myron

Myron is an Ancient Greek male name which means “myrrh, perfume, sweet oil” which seems to be derived from a Semitic root meaning “bitter”. It’s also a surname either derived from the given name or as a short form of Greek Myronakis or Myronidis, both patrynonic surnames.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Semitic

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Variants:

  • Miron (Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish)
  • Mirone (Italian)

 

Female forms:

  • Myra (English)
  • Myrrine (Ancient Greek)
  • Myrrha (English)
  • Myrina (Ancient Greek)

 

Dion

Dion is a shortened form of Dionysios, from Dionysus, the name of the Greek god of wine, revelry, fertility and madness. Although the etymology of his name isn’t quite clear-cut, the first part of the name, Dio-, means “of Zeus” though it could also be related to Proto-Indo-European *dyews meaning “sky, heaven, god” and “shining”. The second part -nysus might be derived from Nysa, the name of a mountain in which Dionysios was raised by the nymphs who lived there; the name might be related to an archaic Greek word meaning “tree”. In Greek mythology, Dion was a king of Laconia who, with his wife Amphithea, had 3 daughters: Orphe, Lyco, and Carya (or Karya). The god Apollo, who had received great hospitality from them, decided to bestow Dion’s daughters with the gift of prophecy on the condition that they never betray the gods. However, when the god Dionysus fell in love with Carya, her sisters tried to prevent the liasion,  which ended up with them being turned into rocks and Carya into a walnut tree.

Dion is also a French surname derived from several place names in France, apparently deriving from a Celtic word meaning “divine”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Ancient Greek

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Variants:

  • Deion
  • Deon
  • Dio
  • Dionysios (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysius (Latinized Ancient Greek)
Female forms:
  • Dionne
  • Deonne
  • Dione
  • Dionnie
  • Diona (English)

 

Sibella

Sibella is a variant form of Sibyl meaning “sybil” which originally referred to female oracles or prophetesses who were sent visions by the gods in Greek and Roman legend. The name comes from Ancient Greek sibulla, a word of uncertain origin though it could have originated as a variant of theobule meaning “divine counsel” from Attic Greek.

Origin: Ancient Greek

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Variants:

  • Sibyl (English)
  • Sybil (English)
  • Sybella (English)
  • Cybill (English)
  • Cybil (English)
  • Sibylle (French, German)
  • Sybille (French, German)
  • Sibylla (Greek, German, Swedish, Late Roman, Late Greek)
  • Sibilla (Italian)
  • Sybilla (Late Roman, Polish)
  • Sébire (Norman)
  • Sibylline (French)
  • Sibyllina (English)
  • Cybil (English)
  • Cybill (English)
  • Cybilla (English)

 

Mimozë

Mimozë is the Albanian form of Mimosa, the name of a genus of plants that are sensitive to touch or light. The name comes from Latin mimus meaning “mime” which comes from Ancient Greek mîmos (mime, actor; mimicking, imitation).

Origin: Ancient Greek

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Variants:

  • Mimosa (English, Spanish, Italian)
  • Mimmu (Finnish)
  • Mimoza (Turkish, Georgian, Albanian, Slovak)
  • Mimóza (Hungarian)