Aytalina

Aytalina Айталина is a beautiful, fascinating name I came across by chance a while ago and I’ve been trying like crazy to figure out its etymology. I know it’s a Russian and Kazakh(?) name and I’m almost positive that the first part of the name, ay ай comes from the Kazah word “moon”, which ultimately derives from a Proto-Turkic origin. The second part of the name is more difficult. It might be related to Kazakh tal тал “willow” or perhaps from Russian talina талина “willow” so the name could essentially be a combination of “moon” + “willow”. I’m not too sold on that latter part, though. However, the name seems to be popular, or at least common from what I’ve found, among the Yakuts, living in the Sakha Republic (also known as Yakutia), a country that is a federal subject of Russia. I mention this because the Yakuts are a Turkic ethnic group and the Yakut language is a Turkic language which ultimately derives from a Proto-Turkic source; and if the first part of Aytalina does indeed come from Proto-Turkic ay ай than it’s likely that the second part of the name also derives from a Proto-Turkic origin- but all of that is just a guess on my part. If anyone knows more about this name, like its etymology and meaning, please let me know!

Origin: uncertain, most likely from a Proto-Turkic source

Meaning: uncertain, though the first part of the name may be derived from Proto-Turkic ay(ай) “moon”. The second element may be related to tal тал “willow”

Usage: Russian (Yakut origin), Yakut

Variants:

  • Aitalina

Galla

Galla is an Ancient Roman cognomen, the feminine form of Gallus which has a few possible meanings depending on its etymology:

  • the most popular is that it comes from the Latin word gallus meaning “rooster, cock” which ultimately derives from a PIE root word;
  • Gallus was also used to refer to someone who came from Gaul (Gallia in Latin), a region which now comprises France, Belgium, and parts of Germany and Italy; the name derives from Proto-Germanic *walhaz (foreigner) which may have originated from Latin Volcae, the name of a Celtic tribe which may possibly be derived from Proto-Celtic *wolkos (hawk), a word of uncertain origin (the Welsh word gwalch “hawk” derives from this) though perhaps related to Latin falco (falcon). It’s also been linked to Proto-Celtic *ulkʷos (wolf), seemingly because the Volcae fought with huge dogs, but that doesn’t seem as likely;
  • Incidentally, a gallus is also a eunuch priest of the Phrygian goddess Cybele and may be derived from a Phrygian origin;
  • Galla was also the name given to the Oromo people, an ethnic group in Ethiopia and Kenya, a word that the Oromo people consider derogatory;
  • Galla is also a Latin word meaning “oak-apple” (also known as an oak gall), derived from an uncertain origin;
  • Galla is also a surname, originating from the given name Gallus or as a nickname; it’s also an Indian surname, a variant of Kalla which seems to derive from a Telugu source.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain

Meaning: “rooster, cock”; originally referred to an inhabitant of Gaul “Gaul” or “Gallic”; also a Latin word “oak-apple”. Also the name of a eunuch priest dedicated to the goddess Cybele, as well as a derogatory word used to refer to the Oromo, an ethnic group in Ethiopia and Kenya

Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish

Variants:

  • Gala (Spanish)
  • Gal·la (Catalan)

Male forms:

  • Gallus (Ancient Roman)
  • Galo (Spanish)
  • Gallo (Italian)
  • Havel (Czech, Slovak)
  • Gál (Hungarian)
  • Gal (Slovene)
  • Gaweł (Polish)

Björk

Björk is an Icelandic and Swedish female name meaning “birch tree” via Old Norse bjǫrk (birch) via Proto-Germanic *berkō which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Björk (also spelled Bjork) is also a Swedish and Norwegian surname, a locational name for someone who lived near some birch trees.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “birch tree”

Usage: Icelandic, Swedish

Pronunciation: b-yurk (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Bjørk (Norwegian, Danish, Faroese)
  • Bjork (anglicized spelling of the name)

Male forms:

  • Birkir (Icelandic)
  • Bjarki (Icelandic)

Woody

Woody as a given name likely originated as a nickname for Woodrow, an English locational surname made up of Old English elements wudu (wood) and rāw (row), so the name likely referred to someone who lived near a row of woods.

Woody is also an English adjective referring to a place covered in woods or something that is made out of wood.

Woody is also an English surname likely a derivative of Wood.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: a nickname from Woodrow “wood row”, likely in reference to someone who lived near a row of woods; also an English word referring to someplace covered in woods or something made out of wood

Usage: English

Myra

Myra was first coined as a given name by English poet Fulke Greville (1554-1628) for his verse poem Caelica sonnet XXV (25). He may have based it from Latin myrrh, the the name of a natural gum or resin extracted from certain plants that was extremely valuable in the ancient world, used for perfume, incense, and medicine. The origin of the word derives from a Semitic root word meaning “bitter”.

Another possible source for the name is possibly an anagram of Mary, a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

Incidentally, Myra was also the name of an Ancient Greek town located in what is now a part of Turkey.

Origin: Semitic; uncertain/unknown etymology

Meaning: uncertain though it could possibly be based from Latin “myrrh”; also possibly an anagram of Mary, of uncertain etymology and meaning though possible meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, or “wished for child”, or “beloved”, “love”

Usage: English

Pronunciation: mie-ra (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Mayra (Spanish, Hispanic)

Hadassah

Hadassah is a Hebrew female name meaning “myrtle”. It was the Hebrew name of Queen Esther, the wife of Ahasuerus, the king of Persia. When the king’s chief advisor, Haman, plots to have all the Jews in the kingdom assassinated, Esther is the one who helps foil his plan. 

Origin: Hebrew

Meaning: “myrtle”

Usage: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Hadasa (Hebrew)
  • Hadas (Hebrew)
  • Hode (Yiddish)
  • Hodel (Yiddish diminutive of Hode)

Gad

In the Old Testament Gad is the name of the first son of Jacob and Zilpah (his wife Leah’s handmaid) and his seventh son overall, and is the founder of one of the Israelite tribes named after him. The name comes from Hebrew gad (גָּד) meaning “luck” which seems to derive from an unknown origin. Gad could also be used as a nickname for Gadiel meaning “luck of God” or God is my luck”. 

Gad is also the name of a pan-Semitic god of fortune and seems to be related to the given name; perhaps the Gad in the Bible was named after this deity. Gad is also the name of a prophet or seer of King David

Gad also seems to be another Hebrew word for coriander

Gad (جاد) is also an Arabic male name, the Egyptian form of Jad meaning “earnest, serious”.

Gad is also a Navajo word meaning “juniper (tree)”.

Origin: Hebrew via an uncertain etymology; Arabic; Navajo

Meaning: a Hebrew male name “luck”; an Arabic male name “serious, earnest”; also a Navajo word “juniper” 

Usage: Hebrew, Arabic (Egyptian)

Pronunciation: gad or jad

Variants:

  • Gadiel (Hebrew)
  • Jad (Arabic)

Links:

Ivor

Ivor is a male given name, the English (British) form of Old Norse Ívarr, made up of Old Norse elements yr (yew “tree”) and arr (warrior) so the name would essentially meaning “yew warrior”. I’ve also seen the first element related to the meaning “bow”; since bows were made out of yew it’s possible that a secondary meaning arose out of it, and that the name Ívarr might have originally referred to an archer. The name was originally brought to English by Scandinavian settlers during the Middle Ages and later spread throughout Ireland, Scotland, and Wales.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “yew + warrior”, possibly in reference to an archer or someone who used a longbow

Usage: English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh

Pronunciationie-vawr (Forvo)ee-vawr

Variants:

  • Ívarr (Old Norse)
  • Ivar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian)
  • Aivar (Estonian)
  • Aivars (Latvian)
  • Iver (Norwegian)
  • Iivari (Finnish)
  • Iivo (Finnish)
  • Ibar (Old Irish)
  • Íomhar (Irish)
  • Iomhar (Scottish)
  • Evander (Scottish, English)- anglicized form of Iomhar

Hazel

Hazel is the name of a tree in the genus Corylus which bears the hazelnut tree. Hazel is also the name of a light-brown greenish color, often used to refer to eye color.

Hazel is also an English surname, a topographical name for someone who lived near a hazelnut tree; it could also have originated as a locational name for someone who came from Amy of several places called Heazile.

The origin of the name comes from Old English hæsl (hazel) < Proto-Germanic *haslaz which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “hazel” referring to both the tree and the color

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Hazelle (English)
  • Hayzel (English)

Owen

Owen is a male given name, an anglicized form of Welsh Owain, making it a cognate of Irish Eòghan, a name of uncertain meaning. The names have often been linked to the Ancient Greek name Eugenios (anglicized as Eugene meaning “well born”) and Eugene has been used to anglicize Owain and Eòghan, but it seems more likely that Owain is Celtic in origin, perhaps linked to Celtic *Esugenios meaning “good born”, combined of Proto-Celtic elements *esus (good) and *genos (born, birth; family), both deriving from a PIE origin.

Another intriguing theory behind the name Esugenios is that it consists of theonym Esus, the name of a Gaulish god, combined with *genos.

Another possible meaning attributed to Eòghan is “of the yew tree” or “born of the yew tree”. The yew tree was an important tree to the ancient Celts, symbolizing immortality (yew trees are long-lived) and rebirth. I’ve also seen it as possibly being derived from Welsh eoghunn meaning “youth”.

In Arthurian legend, Owain is also the name of one of the Knights of the Round Table (also known as Yvain in French). Owen is also a surname deriving from the given name, originally a patrynomic surname.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: “well born” or “good born”; “of the yew tree” or “born of the yew tree”, or possibly “youth”; perhaps a combination of Esus (a Gaulish god) combined with *genos

Usage: English, Welsh

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Variants:

  • Owain (Welsh)
  • Yvain (French)
  • Ywain (Arthurian legends/romances)
  • Eoghan (Irish, Scottish)
  • Eòghan (Irish)
  • Eógan (Ancient Irish)
  • Euan (Scottish)
  • Ewan (Scottish)
  • Ewen (Scottish)
  • Euan (Scottish)

Female forms:

  • Owena (Welsh)
  • Owenna (Welsh, English)

Birch

Birch is the name of any of various trees in the genus Betula. It comes from English birċe, bierċe (birch) via Proto-Germanic *birkijǭ which ultimately derives from a PIE root word meaning “to shine”.

Birch is also a surname originating as a locational/topographical name for someone who lived near some birch trees.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “birch (tree)” 

Usage: English

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Mylo

Mylo is a variant spelling of Milo, an Old Germanic form of Miles. Although the meaning and etymology behind the name is unclear, it’s been linked to Slavic name element milu meaning “gracious, dear”; Miles has also been linked to Latin word mīles meaning “soldier; knight”, a word that derives from an unknown origin, possibly Etruscan, but that seems to be more of a folk etymology than actual fact.

Milo is also the Latinized form of Milon, an Ancient Greek male name meaning “yew”; Milo (Milon) of Croton was a famous wrestler in Ancient Greece in the 6th century, who had won several victories in the Olympic and Pythian Games, and his name became associated with extraordinary strength.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: uncertain though it’s been linked to a Slavic element “gracious, dear”, and has also been associated through folk etymology with Latin mīles “soldier; knight”; also a Latinized form of Ancient Greek Milon “yew”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Milo (English, Ancient Germanic)
  • Miles (English)
  • Myles (English)