Lulu

Lulu لؤلؤة comes from the Arabic word meaning “pearl” and is often used a female given name. I’ve also come across the name as being used as a pet-name often given to slaves (male and female) in the ancient Middle East.

Lulu also originated as a diminutive of names beginning with the Lu/Lou sounds such as Louise/Louisa (“famous battle” or “famous in battle”), Lucy, Lucia (“light”), Luanne (a combination of Louise + Anne “favor, grace”), etc.

Lulu is also a Chinese female name, often used as a double name such as lù lù 露露 meaning “dew” or lù lù 璐璐 “beautiful jade”. There are likely other meanings depending on the characters used.

Origin: Arabic; Chinese

Meaning: “pearl” in Arabic; often used as a short form of names such as Louise “famous battle” or “famous in battle”, Lucy “light”, Luanne; a Chinese female name with varying meanings depending on the characters used “dew” or “beautiful jade”

Usage: Arabic, English, Chinese

Osman

Osman is the Turkish and Kurdish form of Uthman, an Arabic male name meaning “baby bustard” (bustards are large terrestrial birds that live in dry grasslands and steppes). Osman I was the founder of the Ottoman Empire.

Osman is also a surname- a Turkish surname originating from the given name, but it’s also an English surname, a variant of Anglo-Saxon Osmær meaning “god + fame”, made up of Old English os (god) and maer (fame), though it may also be a variant of Osmond “god + protection”.

Origin: Arabic; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “baby bustard”; also an English surname “god + fame” or “god + protection”

Usage: Turkish, Kurdish, English

Variants:

  • Uthman (Arabic)
  • Othman (Arabic, Malay)
  • Usman (Urdu)
  • Ousmane (Western African)
  • Cismaan (Eastern African, Somali)
  • Cusmaan (Eastern African, Somali)
  • Osmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Osmond (Anglo-Saxon, English)

Claire

Claire is the French form of Clara, the feminine form of Late Latin Clarus via Latin clārus meaning “clear, bright, shining; renowned, famous” derived from PIE *kelh₁- (to call, shout).

Claire is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “clear, bright; famous”

Usage: French, English

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Variants:

  • Clara (Italian, English, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman)
  • Klara (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian)
  • Klára (Hungarian, Czech, Slovak)
  • Klāra (Latvian)
  • Chiara (Italian)
  • Chiarina (Italian diminutive of Chiara)
  • Claretta (Italian diminutive of Clara)
  • Clare (English)
  • Clarice (English)
  • Clarissa (English, Italian)

Male forms:

  • Clair (French)
  • Clarus (Late Roman)

Roland

Roland is the the name of a Frankish paladin who served under Charlemagne the Great, King of the Franks and Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, in the 8th century; according to legend, he is also depicted as Charlemagne‘s nephew. Roland was a popular figure in medieval Europe and there was even an epic poem (or chanson de gets in Old French) written about him, The Song of Roland (La Chanson de Roland) which depicts Roland’s final battle and death.

Roland is composed of Germanic elements hrod (fame) and land (land) essentially meaning “famous land”. I’ve also seen a few sites claim the second element deriving from nand meaning “brave”, but land seems more likely, essentially referring to someone who was famous throughout the land.

Roland is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “famous land” or it could be stretched out to mean “famous throughout the land”

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Polish, Medieval French

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Variants:

  • Rolland (English)
  • Rowland (English)
  • Rolin (French, English)
  • Roeland (Dutch)
  • Loránd (Hungarian)
  • Lóránt (Hungarian)
  • Hrodland (Ancient Germanic)
  • Orlando (Italian)
  • Rolando (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian)
  • Roldán (Spanish)
  • Roldão (Portuguese)
  • Rolan (Russian)

Feminine forms:

  • Rolande (French)
  • Rolanda (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Orlanda (Italian)

Gloria

Gloria is a female given name which comes from the Latin word glōria meaning “glory, renown, fame”, used in praise, exaltation, or great honor of someone or something by common consent. It’s background is of obscure/uncertain origin; it may be related to Old Latin *gnōria (knowledge, fame) via PIE root word *ǵneh₃- (to know).

Gloria is also used in a religious sense, the name of several Christian liturgical hymns in praise of God, so it also connotes a sense of “divine glory”.

Gloria is also a Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian surname which originated either a matronymic name or as an occupational name for a singer, in reference to the hymn Gloria in excelsis Deo (“Glory to God in the highest”).

Origin: uncertain, likely from a Proto-Indo-European source

Meaning: “glory, renown, praise, fame”

Usage: English, Latin, Italian, Spanish, German

Nicknames: Glory, Ria, Lori

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Variants:

  • Glória (Portuguese)
  • Glòria (Catalan)
  • Gloría (Icelandic)
  • Gloriana (an elaborated form of Gloria created by English poet Edmund Spenser in 1590 for his poem The Faerie Queen)
  • Gloriela (Spanish, Swedish)
  • Glorina (English)