Lyall

Lyall comes from a Scottish surname via an Old Norse name, Liulfr. The second element derives from Old Norse úlfr meaning “wolf” while the first element of the name remains uncertain.

It’s also possible that Lyall originated as a pet-form of Lionel or Lyon, both meaning “lion”; it derives from Latin leō < Ancient Greek léōn which derives from an uncertain origin; it’s possible it could have been adopted from a non Indo-European source, perhaps from Proto-Semitic *labiʾ-, *labuʾ.

Incidentally, Lyall is a homophone of Lyle (which has a totally different etymology and means “island”).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain, possibly from a Proto-Semitic origin

Meaning: a shortened form of an Old Norse name “wolf”; could also have originated as a pet-form of Lionel or Lyon “lion”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Lyell (English)

Lovell

Lovell comes from an English surname, a variant of Lowell that originated from Norman French nickname lou (or its feminine form louve) meaning “wolf” combined with a diminutive suffix, which might have originated as a nickname for a fierce or savage person. Lou is the Old French form of Latin lupus (wolf) which ultimately derives from a PIE origin

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “wolf” or “little wolf”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Lowell (English)

Leith

Leith comes from a Scottish surname, a locational name for someone who came from a place called Leith, a port area in Edinburgh, as well as the name of a river known as the Water of Leith. The meaning and origin of the name is uncertain. It may be derived from Proto-Brythonic *lleɨθ (damp, moist) via Proto-Celtic *lextos which ultimately derives from a PIE root word. 

It’s also possible that Leith is (or could be used) as a variant transcription of Laith ليث, an Arabic male name meaning “lion”.

Origin: uncertain, possibly from a Proto-Brythonic root word; Arabic

Meaning: uncertain though possibly “wet, damp, moist”; also from Arabic “lion”

Usage: English (rare, as a given name and could be considered a unisex name in English), Arabic

Pronunciationleeth (Forvo); layth (Arabic)

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Variants:

  • Laith (Arabic)
  • Layth (Arabic)

Lester

Lester comes from an English surname, a locational name for someone who came from the city of Leicester, England. The second part of the name is from Old English ceaster meaning “city, town” from via castra (camp, encampment) via a PIE origin. The first part comes from Old English Ligore, the name of a tribe living around the area, which may have been borrowed from the name of a river nearby (now known as the River Soar); the origin of the name is uncertain though it seems likely it has a Celtic source, perhaps connected to the French river Loire which may be derived form Gaulish *ligya, *legya (slit, sediment) derived from PIE root word *legʰ– (to lie).

Lester may also be a variant spelling of Lister, an occupational name for a dyer, which comes from Middle English litster made up of liten (to dye, color) made up of the feminine suffix -stere, both derived from a PIE source.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; uncertain, possibly Celtic

Meaning: a locational name “Ligore’s town”; also an occupational name for a textile dyer

Usage: English

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Variants:

  • Lestor (English)

Leo

Leo comes from the Latin word meaning “lion” via Ancient Greek leon which derives from an uncertain origin; it’s possible it could have been adopted from a non Indo-European source, perhaps from Proto-Semitic *labiʾ-, *labuʾ- (lion). The name might have originated as a nickname for someone who was courageous and brave.

Leo is the name of a constellation representing to the Ancient Greeks the Nemean lion killed by the Greek hero Herakles as part of his twelve labors. Leo is also a Zodiac sign belonging to those born between July 22nd to August 23rd; apparently those born under this sign are stubborn, loyal and trustworthy, assured, confident and ambitious, but prone to arrogance, jealousy, and bossiness.

Leo could also be used as a nickname for names such as Leonidas (an Ancient Greek name meaning “son of the lion” or “son of a lion”), Leopold (a Germanic name meaning “bold people”), and Leonard (meaning “brave lion”), or any name beginning with Leo.

Origin: uncertain, possibly from a Proto-Semitic source

Meaning: “lion”

Usage: Late Roman, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Croatian

Variants:

  • Leon (Greek, Ancient Greek, English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch)
  • Leontios (Ancient Greek)
  • Leontius (Ancient Greek, Latin)
  • Levon (Armenian)
  • Leoš (Czech)
  • Léo (French)
  • Léon (French)
  • Léonce (French form of Leontios)
  • Lionel (French diminutive of Léon; English)
  • Levan (Georgian)
  • Leone (Italian)
  • Leonzio (Italian form of Leontios)
  • Leonas (Lithuanian)
  • Lef (Polish cognate of Lev)
  • Lev (Russian)
  • Leonti (Russian)
  • Leontiy (Russian)
  • Leonty (Russian)
  • Lyov (Russian)
  • León (Spanish)
  • Leoncio (Spanish)
  • Leonius (Late Roman)

Female forms:

  • Leona (English, German, Czech)
  • Leola (English)
  • Leone (French, English)
  • Leontina (Italian, Late Roman)
  • Leonia (Late Roman)
  • Leonie (French, German, Dutch, English)
  • Léonie (French)
  • Léontine (French)
  • Léone (French)
  • Leontýna (Czech)
  • Leontyne (English)