Clinton

Clinton comes from an English surname, a locational name referring to someone who came from a town called Glimpton in Oxfordshire meaning “settlement by the Glym river”, the name meaning “bright stream” in Brittonic; or it could be derived from Glinton, made up of Low Middle German glinde “enclosure”, “fence” + tun “enclosure, settlement”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-Europea

Meaning: “settlement by the Glym river” or “enclosure”, “fence” + “settlement, enclosure”

Usage: English

Nicknames: Clint

Kanna

Kanna is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:

kan

  • “bookmark”
  • “ring, circle, wheel”
  • “tolerant, lenient, generous”
  • “god, deity”
  • “citrus fruit”
  • “joy, delight, pleasure”
  • “daring, brave, bold”

na

  • “greens, vegetables”
  • “what”
  • “Nara; what”
  • “calm, lull” (na(gi)
  • “south”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s かんな while it can also be written in katakana as カンナ.

Kanna (寛和) is also the name of a Japanese era that lasted for two years (985-987). The kanji that make up the name can also be read as Hirokazu meaning “gentleness, harmony”, as well as the name of a type of Japanese plane, a wood-working tool.

Kanna (also spelled channa and canna) is also the name of a succulent plant in South Africa (also known as Sceletium tortuosum) that has been used for centuries as a mood enhancer, able to relieve stress and anxiety as well as induce feelings of euphoria; and can be either smoked, chewed, or brewed as a tea. The kanna plant is also known as Kougoed in Afrikaans meaning “something to chew” or “a thing to chew on”.

Kanna is also another name for Platysace cirrosa (also known as karna), a perennial herb found in Western Australia. Kanna is the Noongar name for the plant, the Noongar being Aboriginal Australians.

Kanna (also known as ganna) is also another name for Caroxylon aphyllum, a species of shrub found in the Karoo region of South Africa.

Kanna is also the name of a town in ancient Lycaonia (what is now modern-day Turkey) as well as the name of a village in southern Poland.

Kanna is also the Haitian Creole word for “duck”.

Origin: Japanese

Meaning: a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used; also the name of a Japanese era and a Japanese plane (wood-working tool); the name of a succulent plant in S. Africa and a shrub, a perennial herb in W. Australia, as well as the name name of a town in Ancient Lycaonia and a village in Poland; also a Haitian Creole word “duck”

Usage: Japanese

Lystra

Lystra is the name of a town in Anatolia (also known as Asia Minor) in what is now modern-day Turkey. It is mentioned several times in the New Testament where the Apostle Paul and his companion Barnabas passed through and where he met Timothy, a future saint who would also become Paul’s companion. The name Lystra is of unknown origin though it likely seems to be pre-Greek in origin. It could be possible that the first part of the name could have been interpreted by the Ancient Greeks from luo λυω “to loosen, unbind”- the first part of the name certainly resembles names beginning with it such as Lysander or Lysistrate, but it seems more likely that it originated from a Proto-Anatolian origin.

Origin: unknown

Meaning: unknown though it may have been interpreted to the Ancient Greeks via luo λυω “to loosen, unbind”

Usage: English

Pronunciation: lye-stra (Forvo)

Hallam

Hallam comes from an English surname, a locational name via Old English halh, healh meaning “corner, angle; nook, recess”; it may also originate from Old Norse hallr “rock, stone; slope, hill” via Proto-Germanic *halluz (rock; stone) via a PIE root word.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “corner; nook, recess” or “rock, stone; slope”

Usage: English

Variants:

  • Halam (English)
  • Hallum (English)

Corby

Corby comes from an English surname with three possible meanings depending on its etymology:

  • the first is that it comes from a locational origin, any of several places called Corby. It’s made up from Old Norse personal name Kori (which seems to be the Old Norse form of Irish cuire “troop, band, company”) combined with býr (settlement, farm) although the one in Cumbria has its first element derived from Old Irish personal name Corc;
  • it’s also possible Corby originated as a diminutive of French corb meaning “raven”;
  • it may also have originated as variant of Irish surname Corboy, the anglicized spelling of Gaelic Mac Corrbuidhe meaning “son of Corrbuidhe”, the latter a byname made up of Irish corr (crane) and buidhe (yellow)

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Proto-Celtic

Meaning: “Kori’s farm” or “Kori’s settlement”, or “Corc’s farm/settlement”; a diminutive of French corb “raven”; a variant of Irish surname Corboy “crane+ yellow”

Usage: English

Variants:

Kinvara

Kinvara is the name of a village located in the southwest County Galway, Ireland as well as the name of a town in west County Galway. The name comes from Irish Cinn Mhara meaning “head of the sea”, composed of Irish ceann (head) and mara, an inflection of muir (sea), both of which ultimately derive from a PIE origin.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “head of the sea”

Usage: English (British)

Myra

Myra was first coined as a given name by English poet Fulke Greville (1554-1628) for his verse poem Caelica sonnet XXV (25). He may have based it from Latin myrrh, the the name of a natural gum or resin extracted from certain plants that was extremely valuable in the ancient world, used for perfume, incense, and medicine. The origin of the word derives from a Semitic root word meaning “bitter”.

Another possible source for the name is possibly an anagram of Mary, a name of uncertain origin though several meanings have been ascribed to it such as “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy” or “wished for child” from a Hebrew root word. It’s also possible that it might have originated from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr or “love” via mr.

Incidentally, Myra was also the name of an Ancient Greek town located in what is now a part of Turkey.

Origin: Semitic; uncertain/unknown etymology

Meaning: uncertain though it could possibly be based from Latin “myrrh”; also possibly an anagram of Mary, of uncertain etymology and meaning though possible meanings attributed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness”, “obstinacy”, or “wished for child”, or “beloved”, “love”

Usage: English

Pronunciation: mie-ra (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Mayra (Spanish, Hispanic)

Solana

Solana is the name of several places found in Spain and in the U.S. The name comes from Spanish solana meaning “solarium, suntrap”, in reference to a place that is often sunny or allows plenty of sunlight. The word derives from Latin sōl meaning “sun” which ultimately derives from a PIE origin. It could also be derived from Solanus, which comes from the Latin referring to the east wind.

Solana is also a Spanish, Catalan, and Aragonese surname originating as a locational name for someone who came from a place called Solana.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “solarium, suntrap” and “sun”

Usage: Spanish, English

Male forms:

  • Solano (Spanish)
  • Solanus (Latin)

Rona

Rona is the name of two islands in Scotland- North Rona, a small, uninhabited island in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, and South Rona, a small, inhabited island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland.  The name seems to derive from Old Norse meaning “rough island”.

Rona is also the name of a figure in Maori mythology. She had gone to the river one night when the moon was hidden behind some clouds. When she was returning home, Rona stepped on a root or rock and was so upset, began to curse at the moon. The moon god heard her and, angered, grabbed her. The woman was so frightened she grabbed onto a ngaio tree but was still pulled up into the sky. I couldn’t find a specific meaning behind the name in Maori.

Rona is also the feminine form of Ron, a Hebrew male name meaning “song, joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Maori; Hebrew

Meaning: the name of two islands in around Scotland “rough island”; the name of a figure in Maori mythology, meaning unknown; feminine form of Hebrew Ron “song, joy”

Usage: Scottish, English, Hebrew

a478b257b5eaec229fde2910d8c40a7c
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Rhona (Scottish)
  • Ronna (English)

Male forms:

  • Ron (Hebrew)

Arden

Arden comes from an English surname, a locational name for someone who came from Arden in Warwickshire or the one from North Yorkshire. The name seems to derive from a Celtic source, via Celtic *ardwo meaning “high”. Another possible meaning I’ve seen listed for Arden as a surname is “eagle valley”, made up of Old English elements earn (eagle) and dene (valley).

Arden is also a Spanish word, the third person plural or arder meaning “to burn”, derived from Latin ardere

Arden is the name of several places in England, including the Forest of Arden located in Warwickshire; the Forest of Arden is the main setting used in William Shakespeare’s play As You Like It (1599), which may have been based on the Ardennes, a heavily forested, hilly region spread out among France, Germany, Luxembourg, and Belgium, which may derive from the same Celtic root word as above. 

Origin: uncertain, either from a Celtic or a Proto-Indo-European source

Meaning: as an English surname it seems to derive from a Celtic source “high”, though it may also mean “eagle valley”; also a Spanish word “they burn”

Usage: English

3c904c26ed7ab1b31fd470f654d7f39a
Pinterest

 

Brandon

Brandon comes from an English surname, a locational name for any of several places called Brandon. The name is composed of Old English elements brōm (broom) and dūn (hill), essentially meaning “hill covered with broom”, likely in reference to a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs. However, the town of Brandon in Lincolnshire seems to have gotten its name from Old English brant (tall, high, steep) which seems to be in reference to the steep banks of a river nearby.

However, Brandon is also a French surname which in this case comes from Old French brandon meaning “firebrand”, referring to a piece of burning wood or other burning material; it can also be used to refer to someone who causes trouble, a troublemaker or agitator. It derives from Frankish *brand (fire, flame) as well as also being a poetic word for “sword”; via Proto-Germanic *brandaz (fire; firebrand; torch; sword) ultimately derived from a PIE root word.

In some cases, Brandon could also be used as an anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Breandáin meaning “son of Breandán”, the latter a variant of Irish name Brendan meaning “prince, king” via Proto-Celtic *brigantīnos, a diminutive of *brigantī (high, exalted) which derives from a PIE root word.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: a surname with a few possible origins: “broom hill” or essentially “hill covered with broom”; “steep hill”; a French surname “firebrand”; also an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Breandáin “son of Breandán”, Breandán meaning “prince, king”

Usage: English

8f9b8066a068440fa7bfcd3fa6102e15
Pinterest

Variants:

  • Branden (English)
  • Brendan (Irish, English, Breton)

Ailsa

Ailsa derives its name from Ailsa Craig, the name of a rocky island located off of Scotland. Though the name’s origin doesn’t seem certain, it’s often been linked as being derived from Alfsigesey meaning “Álfsigr’s island”, Álfsigr an Old Norse male name meaning “elf victory” composed of Old Norse elements alfr (elf) + sigr (victory). Other meanings I’ve seen listed for it are “fairy rock” or “Elizabeth’s rock” but those don’t seem very likely.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: uncertain though it’s been linked to Alfsigesey “Álfsigr’s island”

Usage: Scottish, English

9eb66da12462d5c9ce56e90cfe6f251b
Pinterest