Duvessa

Duvessa is the anglicized form of Dubh Essa meaning “black waterfall”, made up of Irish dubh (black; black-haired) and eas (waterfall, cascade, rapid). Dubh Essa (also spelled Dubhessa) was a fairy common given name in medieval Ireland, in the 13th/14th century.

Duvessa was used in Irish playwright M.J. Molloy’s play The Wooing of Duvessa (1964).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “black waterfall”

Usage: medieval Irish

Variants:

  • Dubh Essa (medieval Irish)
  • Dubhessa (medieval Irish(

Dagmar

Dagmar is a Scandinavian and German female name meaning “day maid” made up of Old Norse elements dagr (day) < Proto-Germanic *dagaz which derives from an uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to PIE root *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn); and mær (maid, girl; and, in a more poetic sense, daughter).

I’ve also seen Dagmar listed as being an Old Danish form of Slavic Dragomira, the feminine form of Dragomir meaning “dear, precious + peace; world”

Origin: Proto-Indo-European; Proto-Slavic

Meaning: “day maid”; could also have originated from Slavic Dragomira “dear, precious + peace; world”

Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak

Variants:

  • Dagmær (Ancient Scandinavian, Old Norse)
  • Dagmara (Polish)
  • Dagna (Polish)
  • Dagnė (Lithuanian)

Desideria

Desideria is the feminine form of Desiderio, the Italian and Spanish form of Late Latin Desiderius meaning “longing, desire” via desidero (to desire, want, wish for) which seems to have originated from the phrase de sidere (‘from the stars’ or ‘of the stars’), made up of Latin prefix de- (of, from) and sidus(star, constellation).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “desire, longing”

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman

Variants:

  • Désirée (French)
  • Desiree (French, English)
  • Desirae (English)
  • Deziree (English)
  • Desirée (German, Swedish)
  • Desiderata (Late Roman)
  • Desidéria (Portuguese)
  • Desire (English)

Male forms:

  • Désiré (French)
  • Desire (French, English)
  • Desideratus (Late Roman)
  • Desiderio (Spanish, Italian)
  • Desidério (Portuguese)
  • Didier (French)
  • Dezső (Hungarian)

Dean

Dean comes from an English surname, either a locational name meaning “valley” via Old English dene (valley), or an occupational name for someone who worked for a dean, the head of an ecclesiastical head of a cathedral. It comes from Latin decānus (chief of ten people) via decem (ten), which ultimately derives from a PIE root word.

A dean is also the head of a college or university, or someone in charge of a department or faculty.

Dean could also be used as a variant spelling of Deen or Dīn (دين)an Arabic male name meaning “religion, faith, creed” and “way of life” as well as having roots in Hebrew din דִּין meaning “law, judgment”, which seems to be derived from a Proto-Semitic origin.

OriginProto-Indo-European; Proto-Semitic

Meaning: an English surname “valley” or “chief of ten”; from Arabic “religion, faith, creed” or “way of life”; also from Hebrew “law, judgment”

Usage: English, Arabic, Hebrew

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Variants:

  • Dene (English)
  • Dane (English)
  • Deane (English)
  • Deen (Arabic)
  • Dīn (Arabic)

Female forms:

  • Dena (English, Arabic)
  • Dina (English, Arabic)
  • Deena (English)
  • Deanna (English)
  • Deana (English)
  • Deanne (English)
  • Deann (English)

Douglas

Douglas is the anglicized form of Scottish surname Dubhghlas meaning “dark river” or “dark stream”, composed of Scottish Gaelic dubh (black) and glais (water; green). It comes from the name of a river in Scotland from which the name of the clan Douglas derives its name from.

Interestingly, Douglas was originally used as a unisex name in the early 17th and 18th century but eventually it only became used as a male name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “dark river” or “dark stream”

Usage: Scottish, English

NicknamesDoug

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Variants:

  • Dubhghlas (Scottish)
  • Douglass (Scottish)

Diego

Diego is a Spanish male name of uncertain etymology. It’s often been linked as a shortened form of Santiago, which itself is an abbreviated form of Latin Sanctus Iacobus “Saint James”, in reference to Saint James the great, the brother of John the Apostle, and also one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus according to the New Testament.

James is the English form of Latin IacobusAncient Greek Iakobos which comes from the Hebrew name Ya’aqov (Jacob) which comes from a Hebrew root word aqeb עָקֵב “heel (of the foot) or essentially “supplanter”, referring to the Biblical Jacob, the younger twin brother of Esau who often “supplanted” his older brother.

During medieval times, Diego was Latinized as Didacus, a name of unknown origin though it’s been linked to Ancient Greek didakhe δῐδᾰχή (teaching, instruction), though whether Diego’s true origins lie there is unknown.

Diego is also a Spanish surname originating from the given name

Origin: unknown

Meaning: though the origin of the name is uncertain it may have originated as a shortened form of Santiago “Saint James”, or perhaps related to Latin Didacus “teaching”

UsageSpanish

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Variants:

  • Santiago (Spanish Portuguese)
  • Diogo (Portuguese)
  • Thiago (Portuguese (Brazilian)
  • Didacus (Medieval Spanish)
  • Dídac (Catalan)
  • Xanti (Basque)

Daniel

Daniel is the name of several figures in the Bible, including the prophet Daniel, who features in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. It comes from a Hebrew name meaning “God is my judge” or “judge of God”, made up of Hebrew dan דָּן (to judge) and el אֵל (god).

Daniel is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Semitic

Meaning: “God is my judge” or “judge of God”

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian

Nicknames: Dan, Danny/Dannie

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Variants:

  • Danilo (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian)
  • Daniele (Italian)
  • Danijel (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Danyal (Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Turkish)
  • Taniel (Armenian)
  • Danel (Basque)
  • Deniel (Breton)
  • Danail (Bulgarian)
  • Daniël (Dutch)
  • Dániel (Hungarian, Faroese)
  • Dánjal (Faroese)
  • Taneli (Finnish)
  • Daníel (Icelandic)
  • Daniels (Latvian)
  • Danielius (Lithuanian)
  • Daniil (Russian)
  • Deiniol (Welsh)

Feminine forms:

  • Danielle (French, English)
  • Danièle (French)
  • Daniela (Bulgarian, Italian, German, Czech, Slovak, Romanian, Portuguese, Spanish, Macedonian, English)
  • Daniella (English)
  • Dana (Romanian, Czech, Slovak, German, Hebrew)
  • Danijela (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Daniëlle (Dutch)

Dora

Dora is often used as a shortened form of names ending or beginning with dora such as Theodora (meaning “god’s gift”), Isadora (“gift of Isis“), Pandora (“all-giving”, “all gifts” or “all-gifted”), Medora (possibly a shortened form of Greek Metrodora “mother’s gift”), Nymphodora (“gift of the nymph” or “gift of the bride”), Menodora (“gift of the moon”), or Dorothy, Dorothea (“gift of god”), etc.

Dora could also simply be used as a given name on its own simply meaning “gift” which comes from Ancient Greek doron (gift) derived from a PIE root word.

Dora is also an Old English word meaning “bee, bumblebee” or “humming insect” via Proto-Germanic *durô (bumblebee, humming insect) derived from a PIE root word. For fans of Harry Potter, dumbledore is a dialectical word from Hampshire, Cornwall, for a bumblebee.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: often a nickname for names beginning or ending with Dora, or could simply be used on its own, simply meaning “gift; is also an Old English word for “bee, bumblebee”

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Greek, Croatian, Serbian, Dutch

Variants:

  • Dory (English)
  • Dorie (English)
  • Doree (English)
  • Doria (English)
  • Doreen (English)
  • Dorina (English, Hungarian, Romanian)

Delora

Delora is an English female name, a variant of Dolores, a Spanish female name meaning “sorrows”. It comes from the Spanish title La Virgen María de los Dolores (The Virgin Mary of the Sorrows); dolores is the Spanish and Latin plural form of dolor meaning “pain, grief, sorrow” derived from PIE *delh₁-* (to split, divide).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “sorrows”

Usage: English

Nicknames: Del, Delly, Della, Lora

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Variants:

  • Dolores (Spanish, English)
  • Delores (English)
  • Deloris (English)
  • Dolors (Catalan)
  • Dores (Portuguese, Galician)
  • Addolorata (Italian)
  • Dolorès (French)
  • Lola (Spanish & English diminutive of Dolores)
  • Lolita (Spanish & English diminutive of Dolores)
  • Loli (Spanish & English diminutive of Dolores)