Glynis

Glynis is a Welsh female name, either a variant of Glenys derived from the Welsh word glân meaning “clean, clear, holy” via Proto-Celtic *glanos (clean; clear), or it’s an elaborated form of Welsh glyn “valley”.

Origin: Proto-Celtic

Meaning: “clean, clear, holy” or “valley”

Usage: Welsh

Variants:

  • Glenys (Welsh)
  • Glennis (anglicized spelling of Glynis/Glenys)
  • Glenice (anglicized spelling of Glynis/Glenys)

Hywel

Hywel is a Welsh male name meaning “eminent”, combined of Welsh elements hy- (good) and gwêl (sight) both of which derive from a PIE origin; though it’s also been linked to Breton uhel (high)< Proto-Brythonic *ʉxel (high, elevated)< *ouxselos (high, elevated) derived from a PIE root word.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “eminent”

Usage: Welsh

Pronunciation: huw-ehl (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Howell (anglicized form of Hywel)
  • Hoel (Breton)

Ivor

Ivor is a male given name, the English (British) form of Old Norse Ívarr, made up of Old Norse elements yr (yew “tree”) and arr (warrior) so the name would essentially meaning “yew warrior”. I’ve also seen the first element related to the meaning “bow”; since bows were made out of yew it’s possible that a secondary meaning arose out of it, and that the name Ívarr might have originally referred to an archer. The name was originally brought to English by Scandinavian settlers during the Middle Ages and later spread throughout Ireland, Scotland, and Wales.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “yew + warrior”, possibly in reference to an archer or someone who used a longbow

Usage: English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh

Pronunciationie-vawr (Forvo)ee-vawr

Variants:

  • Ívarr (Old Norse)
  • Ivar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian)
  • Aivar (Estonian)
  • Aivars (Latvian)
  • Iver (Norwegian)
  • Iivari (Finnish)
  • Iivo (Finnish)
  • Ibar (Old Irish)
  • Íomhar (Irish)
  • Iomhar (Scottish)
  • Evander (Scottish, English)- anglicized form of Iomhar

Owen

Owen is a male given name, an anglicized form of Welsh Owain, making it a cognate of Irish Eòghan, a name of uncertain meaning. The names have often been linked to the Ancient Greek name Eugenios (anglicized as Eugene meaning “well born”) and Eugene has been used to anglicize Owain and Eòghan, but it seems more likely that Owain is Celtic in origin, perhaps linked to Celtic *Esugenios meaning “good born”, combined of Proto-Celtic elements *esus (good) and *genos (born, birth; family), both deriving from a PIE origin.

Another intriguing theory behind the name Esugenios is that it consists of theonym Esus, the name of a Gaulish god, combined with *genos.

Another possible meaning attributed to Eòghan is “of the yew tree” or “born of the yew tree”. The yew tree was an important tree to the ancient Celts, symbolizing immortality (yew trees are long-lived) and rebirth. I’ve also seen it as possibly being derived from Welsh eoghunn meaning “youth”.

In Arthurian legend, Owain is also the name of one of the Knights of the Round Table (also known as Yvain in French). Owen is also a surname deriving from the given name, originally a patrynomic surname.

Origin: uncertain

Meaning: “well born” or “good born”; “of the yew tree” or “born of the yew tree”, or possibly “youth”; perhaps a combination of Esus (a Gaulish god) combined with *genos

Usage: English, Welsh

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Variants:

  • Owain (Welsh)
  • Yvain (French)
  • Ywain (Arthurian legends/romances)
  • Eoghan (Irish, Scottish)
  • Eòghan (Irish)
  • Eógan (Ancient Irish)
  • Euan (Scottish)
  • Ewan (Scottish)
  • Ewen (Scottish)
  • Euan (Scottish)

Female forms:

  • Owena (Welsh)
  • Owenna (Welsh, English)