Aytalina

Aytalina Айталина is a beautiful, fascinating name I came across by chance a while ago and I’ve been trying like crazy to figure out its etymology. I know it’s a Russian and Kazakh(?) name and I’m almost positive that the first part of the name, ay ай comes from the Kazah word “moon”, which ultimately derives from a Proto-Turkic origin. The second part of the name is more difficult. It might be related to Kazakh tal тал “willow” or perhaps from Russian talina талина “willow” so the name could essentially be a combination of “moon” + “willow”. I’m not too sold on that latter part, though. However, the name seems to be popular, or at least common from what I’ve found, among the Yakuts, living in the Sakha Republic (also known as Yakutia), a country that is a federal subject of Russia. I mention this because the Yakuts are a Turkic ethnic group and the Yakut language is a Turkic language which ultimately derives from a Proto-Turkic source; and if the first part of Aytalina does indeed come from Proto-Turkic ay ай than it’s likely that the second part of the name also derives from a Proto-Turkic origin- but all of that is just a guess on my part. If anyone knows more about this name, like its etymology and meaning, please let me know!

Origin: uncertain, most likely from a Proto-Turkic source

Meaning: uncertain, though the first part of the name may be derived from Proto-Turkic ay(ай) “moon”. The second element may be related to tal тал “willow”

Usage: Russian (Yakut origin), Yakut

Variants:

  • Aitalina

Yermolay

Yermolay is a Russian male name, the Russian form of Ancient Greek Hermolaos meaning “people of Hermes”, Hermes being the Greek god of commerce and trade, protector of thieves, and the messenger of the gods (ultimately the name derives from an uncertain origin) combined with laos “people”.

Origin: uncertain; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “people of Hermes”

Usage: Russian

Variants:

  • Yermolai (Russian)
  • Ermolai (Russian)
  • Hermolaos (Ancient Greek)

Nadezhda

Nadezhda is a Russian female name meaning “hope” via Russian nadéžda наде́жда (hope, expectation)< Proto-Slavic *nadeďa (hope) which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “hope”

Usage: Russian, Bulgarian

Nicknames: Nadia, Nadya (Russian and Bulgarian diminutive)

Pronunciation: nu-DYEZH-də (Forvo)

Variants:

  • Nadejda (Russian, Bulgarian)
  • Nadzeya (Belarusian)
  • Naděžda (Czech)
  • Nadège (French)
  • Nadine (French, German, English)
  • Nadežda (Slovak, Serbian, Latvian)
  • Nadzieja (Polish)
  • Nadya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian)
  • Nadiya (Ukrainian)
  • Nadia (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, French, Italian, Spanish, English)

Illarion

Illarion is a Russian male name, the Russian form of Ancient Roman Hilarius meaning “cheerful happy” via Ancient Greek hilaros ἱλᾰρός (cheerful, merry, glad)< hilaos (gracious; kind) which ultimately derives from a PIE root word.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “cheerful, glad”

Usage: Russian

Nicknames: Larya (Russian)

Variants:

  • Ilariy (Russian)
  • Ilarion (Macedonian, Bulgarian)
  • Hilarius (Ancient Roman)
  • Hilarion (Ancient Greek)
  • Ilari (Finnish)
  • Hillar (Estonian)
  • Hilaire (French)
  • Ilario (Italian)
  • Ealair (Scottish Gaelic)
  • Ellar (Scottish, anglicized form of Ealair)
  • Hilario (Spanish)
  • Ilar (Welsh)
  • Hilary (English)
  • Ellery (English)

Female forms:

  • Hilaria (Ancient Roman, Spanish)
  • Ilaria (Italian)
  • Ilary (Italian)
  • Hilary (English)
  • Hillary (English)
  • Ellery (English)

Oksana

Oksana is a Ukrainian and Russian name, the Ukrainian form of Xenia which is an Ancient Greek name meaning “hospitality”, derived from Ancient Greek xenos (stranger, foreigner; guest). Xenia was an Ancient Greek concept of hospitality towards strangers or friends, and even an important aspect to the Greek gods- one of the many epithets given to Zeus was Xenios, the protector of guests and the patron of hospitality who avenged any wrongdoing done to guests by their hosts.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: “hospitality”

Usage: Ukrainian, Russian

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Variants:

  • Xenia (Ancient Greek)
  • Zenia (English form of Xenia)
  • Oxana (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Kseniya (Russian)
  • Aksinya (Russian)
  • Ksenija (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene)
  • Senja (Finnish)
  • Ksenia (Polish)

Yuri

Yuri is a Russian, Ukrainian, and Belarusian male name, the Slavic form of George meaning “farmer, earthworker” made up of Ancient Greek elements ge (earth) which seems to derive from an unknown origin, likely pre-Greek in origin; and ergon (work), which ultimately desires from a PIE root word. Interestingly enough, I’ve found that Yuri is a somewhat popular male name in Brazil which I’m assuming comes from the Slavic name.

Yuri is also a Japanese female name. It means “lily” written with the kanji 百合 but has other meanings depending on the kanji used:

yu 

  • “cause, reason”
  • 友 “friend”
  • 有 “exist; have; possess”
  • “divine help”

ri

  • 梨 “pear”
  • “village”
  • “reason, logic”
  • “profit, benefit”
  • 莉 “jasmine”

There are other meanings depending on the kanji used. Written in hiragana it’s ゆり and in katakana it’s ユリ.

Yuri is also a Korean female name (also spelled Yu-ri and Yoo-ri) written in hangul as 유리 and has different meanings depending on the hanja used such as: 

유 (yu)

  • () “to approve”
  • () “childish; immature; young” 
  • (宥) “forgive”
  • (釉) “glaze”

리 (ri)

  • (利) “benefit, advantage”
  • () “pear” 

Yuri also means “glass” written with the hanja 琉璃. There are likely other meanings depending on the hanja used

 Origin: unknown; Proto-Indo-European; Japanese; Korean

Meaning: Russian and Ukrainian male name “farmer, earth-worker”; also a Japanese and Korean female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji and hanja used

Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Portuguese, Japanese, Korean 

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Female variants:

  • Yu-ri (Korean)
  • Yoo-ri (Korean)
  • You-ri (Korean)
  • Yuriko (Japanese)- with the ko suffix meaning “child”
  • Yurina (Japanese) with the na kanji
  • Yurika (Japanese)- with the ka kanji

Male forms:

  • Yuriy (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Yury (Russian, Belarusian)
  • Iouri (Russian)

Sonia

Sonia is a variant spelling of Sonya, a Russian diminutive of Sofiya, the Russian, Ukrainian, and Bulgarian form of Sophia which comes from Ancient Greek sophía σοφῐ́ᾱ meaning “wisdom”, originally connoting the meaning of skill or cleverness, especially in regards to a craft or someone who was wise and learned; it derives from Ancient Greek sophos which originates from an unknown origin.

Sonia is also a popular Indian female name though in this case it seems to be derived from Sanskrit sonā सोना meaning “gold” via suvárna (meaning “gold” as a noun, and “gold, golden color; bright, brilliant hue; good color” as an adjective), which ultimately derives from a PIE origin.

Origin: unknown; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: ultimately from Sophia meaning “wisdom”; is also an Indian female name meaning “gold”

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, French, Greek, Russian, Indian, Hindi

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Variants:

  • Sonya (Russian, English)
  • Sonja (German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Sonje (German)
  • Sofya (Russian)
  • Sophia (Ancient Greek, Greek, English, German)
  • Sofia (Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Italian, Greek, Finnish Estonian, Slovak, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian)
  • Sophie (French, English, German, Dutch)
  • Sophy (English)
  • Sofija (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, Latvian)
  • Sofie (German, Danish, Dutch, Czech)
  • Žofie (Czech)
  • Soňa (Czech, Slovak)
  • Sohvi (Finnish)
  • Sopio (Georgian)
  • Szofi (Hungarian)
  • Zsófia (Hungarian)
  • Szófia (Hungarian)
  • Szonja (Hungarian)
  • Soffía (Icelandic)
  • Zofia (Polish)
  • Žofia (Slovak)

Male forms:

  • Soni (Indian, Hindi)

Martin

Martin is a shortened form of Ancient Roman Martinus, a derivative of Mars, the Roman god of war (and the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology. It’s been linked to Latin mas meaning “man, male” of unknown origin though perhaps derived from a PIE root word meaning young man. However, it’s possible that Mars may be related to an older source, perhaps adopted from the Etruscan god Maris (the god of agriculture and fertility); this might be possible since Mars was also associated with agriculture and fertility.

Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers. Etruscan seems to be a pre-Indo-European language of which very little is known about; the Etruscan civilization was conquered and than assimilated by the Ancient Romans, and the Etruscan language eventually died out with very little of it left behind. The origin of both names is unknown, but Mavors could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”. Mars could also be derived from the same PIE root as Sanskrit marici “ray of light”, ultimately derived from PIE *mer- meaning “to die; to disappear”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, but the links are tenuous at best.

Martin is also the name of a type of bird related to the swallow- something about the bird migrating during the time of Martinmas (a festival celebrating St. Martin of Tours, a former Roman soldier who left and became the bishop of Tours). However, as an English surname it may have originated as a topographical name either meaning “settlement by the boundary” via Old English elements mǣre (boundary, border) and tūn (settlement) or “settlement by the lake” with the first element via Old English mere (sea, ocean; lake).

Origin: unknown, possibly Etruscan; Proto-Indo-European

Meaning: from Ancient Roman Martinus “belonging to Mars”, a name of uncertain origin and meaning though various possible meanings attributed to it are “man, male”, “turner of the battle”, perhaps from PIE root word *mer- (to die), or related to Latin marceo “to (cause to) wither” or “to (make) shrivel”, or Latin marcus “hammer”- though all of them are tenuous; Martin is also an English surname, a locational name “settlement by the boundary” or “settlement by the lake”

Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Romanian, Russian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish, Spanish

Nicknames: Marty/Martie, Mart (Dutch), Tine (Slovene), Tinek (Slovene), Tin (Croatian), Matxin (Basque)

Variants:

  • Martinus (Ancient Roman, Dutch)
  • Maarten (Dutch)
  • Marten (Dutch)
  • Martijn (Dutch)
  • Merten (German)
  • Mårten (Swedish)
  • Morten (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Márton (Hungarian)
  • Martti (Finnish)
  • Mattin (Basque)
  • Martí (Catalan)
  • Máirtín (Irish)
  • Martino (Italian)
  • Martynas (Lithuanian)
  • Marcin (Polish)
  • Martim (Portuguese)
  • Martinho (Portuguese)
  • Martín (Spanish)
  • Martyn (Welsh, Ukrainian)

Female forms:

  • Martine (French, Dutch, Norwegian, English)
  • Martina (German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, Swedish, Ancient Roman)
  • Martyna (Polish)

Roman

Roman is a male given name derived from Late Latin Romanus meaning “Roman” and “of Rome”, denoting someone who was a citizen of Rome. Rome itself is a name of uncertain origin though there are several possible theories regarding the name’s etymology:

  • according to Roman mythology, Rome’s name derives from the name of its founder and first king, Romulus whose name means “of Rome”, also of unknown meaning;
  • it may be derived from Rumen or Rumon, an archaic name for the Tiber river, which may be derived from PIE root word *srew- (to flow, stream);
  • it may have originated from Etruscan ruma meaning “teat”, perhaps in reference to the wolf that took in and suckled the infants Romulus and Remus in Roman mythology when they were left to die as infants, or it could have been named for the shape of the Palatine and Aventine hills;
  • it’s also possible that it’s from Ancient Greek rhome ῥώμη meaning “strength”, of unknown origin.

Roman is also a surname originating from the given name, though it could have also originated as a locational name for someone who came from Rome or from Italy in general, or who had made a pilgrimage there.

Origin: unknown

Meaning: “Roman, of Rome”, referring to someone who was a citizen of the Roman Empire

Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German, English

Nicknames: Roma (Russian), Ro

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Variants:

  • Romanus (Latin)
  • Romanos (Latin, Greek)
  • Romain (French)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romeo (Italian)
  • Romolo (Italian form of Romulus)
  • Romaeus (Latin form of Romeo)
  • Romà (Catalan)
  • Román (Hungarian, Spanish)
  • Romão (Portuguese)

Female forms:

  • Romana (Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman)
  • Romola (Italian feminine form of Romulus)
  • Romaine (French, English)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romayne (English)
  • Romána (Hungarian)

Elena

Elena is a female given name in several languages, a cognate of Helen. In Greek mythology, Helen (Helene in Ancient Greek) is the name of a daughter of Zeus and Leda, considered to be one of the most beautiful women in the world whose kidnapping by Paris led to the 10 year Trojan war.

The origin of Helen is unknown- it’s been linked to Ancient Greek helene meaning “torch”, likely in reference to something that shines or illuminates, so the name would essentially mean “the shining one” or “the bright one”; another possible origin is from Ancient Greek selene “moon”, which would tie it to the idea of illumination and light.

Elena is also a variant transcription of Yelena the Russian form of Helen.

Origin: uncertain, though it may be derived from a pre-Greek source

Meaning: uncertain, though it’s been linked to Ancient Greek helene “torch” or selene “moon”, essentially meaning “the shining one” or “the bright one”

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, Greek, German, English

Variants:

  • Elene (Georgian, Sardinian)
  • Eleni (Modern Greek)
  • Helen (Greek, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Helena (English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian)
  • Helene (French, English, Ancient Greek, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German)
  • Hélène (French)
  • Heléna (Hungarian)
  • Elin (Scandinavian, Welsh, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Elīna (Latvian)
  • Helēna (Latvian)
  • Elēna (Latvian)
  • Jeļena (Latvian)
  • Elina (Finnish, Swedish)
  • Eliina (Finnish)
  • Heleena (Finnish)
  • Eline (Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Ileana (Romanian, Spanish, Italian)
  • Yelena (Russian)
  • Alyona (originally a Russian diminutive of Yelena)
  • Elaine (English, Old French)
  • Elaina (English)
  • Alena (Belarusian)
  • Jelena (Serbian, Croatian, Estonian, Slovene, Lithuanian)
  • Heleen (Dutch)
  • Ellen (English)
  • Léan (Irish)
  • Olena (Ukrainian)
  • Elen (Welsh)